yew sculptures

Photo shows an oak bench with a sculpture of shakespear sitting on the far end

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture 800 600 Simon O'Rourke

There’s no doubt about it, commissioning a sculpture by Simon can be expensive. As we explained in our blog “Why is Art so Expensive?“, there are lots of costs that go into creating a chainsaw carved sculpture. It’s not just the timber and time! This cost can be off-putting, and ultimately cause people to write off the idea. However, there are lots of ways you can raise the funds, and the cost doesn’t need to be a problem. Read on for some of our ideas about how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture…

Photo shows an oak bench with a sculpture of shakespear sitting on the far end

A multi-day project like this can be costly, but there are creative ideas for funding your commission

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Obtain a Grant

Many people don’t realise grants are available for funding certain sculptures. Where you look for that grant depends on the purpose and subject of your sculpture.
For example, if you are creating a Woodland Sculpture Trail, these are often part of the environmental education goals of an organisation. In this case you could look for grants for learning outside of the classroom, or environmental awareness.

If your sculpture is for creating an outdoor attraction, there are currently grants for business to adapt to covid regulations. Grants from the Arts Council and ArtFund provide funding to help museums, galleries and other visual arts organisations realise adventurous projects.

There are also more general grants you could consider. What about the National Lottery? Or a sculpture-specific grant? For example, The Henry Moore Foundation will sometimes offer funds as part of its mission to support sculpture across historical, modern and contemporary registers.

Although they can be elusive, there are grants to be found, so it’s worth investing time to look.

woodland sculpture trails by simon o'rourke. Photo shows a howling wolf in redwood, surrounded by trees. Located in Fforest Fawr.

This wolf forms part of the Fforest Fawr trail. There are often grants available to fund outdoor attractions like this, especially if it is part of adapting for covid regulations.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Sponsorship by a Local Company

If your sculpture benefits the community in some way, it may be possible to raise funds by asking a local company to sponsor some – or all! – of the cost. Some companies offer fund-matching which can relieve some pressure. Others will cover the cost completely, especially if they are looking to build their reputation in the area.  An example of this is Simon’s sculpture in Capenhurst. Urenco funded the entire sculpture!
There is one key principle to apply here too… You never know if you don’t ask! Be bold! Write to local companies. Reach out! The worst that can happen is they say no!
And if local companies aren’t an option, what about a national company with a local presence. Tesco Bags of Help scheme allows the community to vote for three projects at a time, so you can get up to £2000 towards the cost of a sculpture that benefits the community in some way.

how to raise funds for your tree carving sculpture: this wildlife scene in capenhurst was funded by urenco. it features various local animals in a 'totem' style and is standing on a green space with houses in the background

This wildlife scene on a village green was funded entirely by a company with a local presence

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is a bit of a buzz word, but basically describes asking lots of people for a small amount of money – usually via the internet. It’s important to choose a website that is easy to use and trusted. GoFundMe would be our top recommendation, as it’s well run, easy to use and has a solid reputation. IndieGoGo is lesser-known but also a site that allows for community projects such as a sculpture trail. It also allows you to offer incentives to donors for larger amounts. If you are wondering what those rewards could be, we have an idea! Simon offers a package that gives clients a copy of the original sketches and a DVD of the sculpture being made. Perhaps you could offer a copy of the DVD or sketch to people making large donations?

Crowdfunding in the community has the added benefit that it also gives people more of a sense of ownership or involvement in the project which always beneficial.

how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture: projects like this which are in public places could be funded through crowd sourcing. Photo shows a giant hand carved into a dead tree trunk. it is surrounded by trees.

Public sculptures like this Giant Hand of Vyrnwy could potentially be funded through crowdfunding.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Fundraising Events

Another idea for raising funds for a community sculpture is holding a fundraising event. We’re all familiar with bake sales, and there’s a reason for that. They’re popular!

Now being honest, you will need to sell a LOT of cakes to raise the money needed for a large scale sculpture or sculpture series! BUT community fundraisers can still be a help. Sponsored events, dances, quiz nights, raffles, competitions, book drives…they are all tried and tested methods.

In this category, we would also count using a website like Bonfire or Teespring to create merchandise that can easily be sold to generate funds. Using sites like these mean you don’t need to be concerned about inventory. You set up your shop, upload your products and they take care of manufacture and shipping. You have no customer service issues and you don’t have to invest money in products you may not sell. One of our team raised £3000 for medical costs incurred in the US using Bonfire, so we know it can work!

how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture: consider fundraising events or selling merchandise  for a sculpture for a local park. Photo shows a dead yew tree trunk carved into a dragon hatching from its base

Although this was a private commission, transforming a dead tree in a local park into a sculpture like this could be done through fundraising.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Monetise your Tree Carving Sculpture

Our final suggestion for raising funds for a sculpture by Simon O’Rourke, is to monetise the sculpture. That is, use it in some way to generate funds.

We don’t mean to do that all year round necessarily. In the case of something like a woodland sculpture trail, that would take away from its purpose. However, there are ways you could do this occasionally.

  • Perhaps by hosting a special moonlight walk around the trail once or twice a year with an admission fee?
  • What about selling tickets for a ‘sneak peak’ event before the official unveiling?
  • Or if you are having a sculpture created from a standing trunk on site,  IF health and safety allows for it, could you let people watch Simon carve for an hour for a donation?
  • If your sculpture is a character with a name such as Ruby the Owl, Verity the Vole, or Horatio the Hedgehog, could you run a competition to name it, or guess the name?
  • Or if the unveiling involves a celebrity, sell raffle tickets for the opportunity to be part of the ceremony and be photographed with the sculpture and celebrity?

Monetising your sculpture may not initially seem easy, but we’re sure there are ways you could do it occasionally to offset the costs.

Sculpture of a scarecrow made from oak by Simon O'Rourke. He is pointing to the sky and surrounded by bare trees.

Meet Tattybogle the scarecrow! Naming a sculpture is one of the ways to generate smalle rtirckles of money that can help offset costs of your sculpture by Simon.

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Final Thoughts

We hope this has been helpful for you in generating some ideas for funding your tree carving sculpture by Simon. While some of them will by no means cover the cost, we hope they will be a springboard for you for other ideas as well as possibly bringing in small amounts. After all, every little helps!

Simon never wants the cost of a sculpture to be prohibitive either. So when you chat about the costs of a commission, why not ask him for some alternative ideas if the initial suggestion is too costly? Someone from the team can also talk to you about structuring payments.

Contact us using the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/
We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Game of thrones sculpture: photo shows the dragon eggs on the left, and the eggs being held in the casket made by simon o'rourke on the right

Game of Thrones Sculpture – Two Years On

Game of Thrones Sculpture – Two Years On 1024 576 Simon O'Rourke

In January 2019 Simon revealed what was one of his most exciting projects at that stage in his career: The Dragon Casket for HBO’s Game of Thrones. We shared about the project at the time in our For the Throne blog. It’s fun to revisit projects though, so this week we revisit the Game of Thrones sculpture, two years on….

Game of thrones sculpture by simon o'rourke. A casket reminiscent of a dragon mouth, containing three dragon eggs

Simon’s Game of Throne’s sculpture was part of the advertising for season eight of HBO’s Game of Thrones

The Brief

Simon’s Game of Thrones sculpture was part of the advertising for the eighth season of HBO’s hit show Game of Thrones. The company gave select artists from around the world props from the show. Each artist then created something around that prop. Viewers were also invited to share their fan art in a campaign known as #ForTheThrone. Simon received the dragon eggs given to Daenery as a wedding gift, and created a casket to hold them. To see his reaction as he unpacked them, watch the video below…

The Design

When Simon created the casket, he had a few practical considerations to take into account. This included the eggs sitting securely, the casket standing without support, and being transportable. As well as being functional, his goal was to also create something that was beautiful and told a story…

Artist simon o'rourke, his wife Liz and dog kneel either side of his game of thrones sculpture; a dragon-mouth egg casket

Symbolism in the Sculpture

Simon’s skill and a lovely piece of yew ensured the sculpture was practical, striking and beautiful. There were a few things that Simon did too that created a sense of story…

Incorporating Elements of Dragon Anatomy

Viewers know that dragons are an important part of Game of Thrones. Using dragon anatomy in the design (primarily wings, teeth and scaly texture) reflected this – as well as the fact the eggs themselves were dragon eggs.

Simon O'Rourke using a chainsaw to create his game of thrones sculpture: a dragon egg casket

Simon at work creating the dragon wings that shroud the eggs

Mismatched Teeth

The mismatched teeth serve several purposes. They help hold the eggs in place which was essential for safe travel! Missing teeth and the texture give a sense of something ancient. The asymmetry also makes it feel edgy – dangerous even – and uncomfortable.

close up of the mismatched dragon teeth on simon o'rourke's game of thrones sculpture: a dragon casket for holding and carrying dragon eggs

The mismatched and broken teeth convey a sense of danger

Ash Wood Poles

Simon chose to use poles to transport the casket. This was not only functional, but the fact it was then carried by four people heightened the sense that this was important, valuable cargo.

Yew Wood

Although this wasn’t intentional, Simon also realised that the markings and colour of the yew he used to make it were reminiscent of Daenerys’ hair! Not intentional, but it added to the overall impact of the sculpture!

simon o'rourke's dragon casket (game of thrones sculpture)

Experiencing the Sculpture

In the TV show, the eggs are not just viewed. Their appearance and the sense of mystery surrounding them invites people to touch them. Each person then experiences something different. For example, Daenerys is the only one who can sense something living inside them.
Simon wanted to create something similar with this sculpture, and did this largely with texture. Things like the smooth wings emerging from the rough bark left with it’s natural markings, contrasting again with the dragon’s mouth, invite touch. The uneven texture and natural curves and knots means each person who touches it will also experience something different – just like the eggs.

open mouth of simon o'rourke's egg casket (game of thrones sculpture)

The contrasting textures invite people to explore the sculpture through touch

Simon’s Reflection

At the time, Simon was extremely honoured and excited to be taking part in this campaign, along with artists including Jeff Soto, Robert Ball, and Eva Eskelinen. In thinking about the Game of Thrones sculpture now, two years on, and the response people had, Simon and his wife Liz feel just as honoured…

“[we were] just so humbled for Simon’s work to get the responses it did and humbled at how many people love Simon’s work and follow him on our social media platforms. It inspires him to keep going, knowing how much people appreciate his art and his creativity and passion for what he does.”

Game of thrones sculpture: photo shows the dragon eggs on the left, and the eggs being held in the casket made by simon o'rourke on the right

Always New!

One of the things with revisiting art, is that there is always something new to see or experience. In looking back at this Game of Thrones sculpture, what stood out to you that was different this time? Let us know in the comments.

We hope you enjoyed looking back at this landmark project with us. And, as always, if you would like to chat with Simon about your own commission, contact us using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.

 

 

The Great Resc-yew (rescue): Two Towers and a Dragon

The Great Resc-yew (rescue): Two Towers and a Dragon 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Two Towers and a dragon.
Sorry, nothing to do with the movie! Although if you enjoy Tolkien, you could read our blog about Simon’s Lord of the Rings sculpture.
Rather these two towers and a dragon were straight from Simon’s imagination. As well as telling a story, they are actually also a happy ending in themselves! Read on to find out more about ‘the great resc-yew’…

Two towers and a dragon by Simon O'Rourke

The Resc-Yew Plan

These stunning sculptures began their life as yew trees (now the ‘rescue – rescyew puns make sense!) which had become problematic. Yew is a fascinating and beautiful wood which grows in all kinds of shapes and patterns. They are some of the oldest trees in the country, are great for making all kinds of things. This ranges from carving household objects and art to furniture. Most famously though, they have the reputation of making the best long bows! However, that wild beauty can sometimes cause problems for the landowners.
In this case, they were growing too close to the house.

Initially, the owners had the tops removed, but it turned out that wasn’t going to be a good long-term solution. Rather than remove them completely, they decided to turn them into a different kind of beautiful – a Simon O’Rourke sculpture! All projects have their points of fun and excitement, but one of the things Simon enjoys about this kind of commission is the sense of giving life and purpose back to something that had either died, was damaged, or could no longer remain as it was. Even better when it’s something as fun and unique as this fairytale sculpture!

Incidentally, if you have trees which are becoming problematic, read our blog about Treetech, a tree surgeon we work with and recommend to give you an evaluation!

The dragon from Two Towers and a Dragon by Simon O'Rourke

Creating the Sculptures

After chatting with the owners about what they would like, Simon went to work, employing not only his skill, but his creativity and imagination to create this scene from a story Tolkien or C S Lewis would be proud of!

Simon kept some of the bark to allow the trees to blend in more with the rest of the garden. This also adds age and authenticity to the towers, as if they are something from an long-ago, far away adventure. He created the initial shapes using Stihl chainsaws, then used his Manpa angle grinders and chainsaw bars, and Saburrtooth bits to create the details and added texture. The beautiful natural patterns within the yew combined with Simon’s deeper cuts that mark the stone and tiles, to create the feel of ancient stone towers that have been weathered over the years.

The Two Towers from Two towers and a dragon by simon o'rourke

Choose Your Own Adventure

One of the fun things about a sculpture like this, is it not only looks great, but sparks the imagination. This is something that is important to Simon in every sculpture he creates, and even shares in his biography that he wants “people to feel like they’ve experienced part of a story”

In this story, with the two towers and a dragon, the castle is under threat from the dragon. As we look at him, we see he is quietly watching, formulating his plan, and resting his wings, which although relaxed at this moment, are clearly powerful and large.

But what happens next?

Simon has set the scene and created a stunning piece of art, but the rest is up to you.
Can the towers withstand the attack?
Who or what is within them to attract the dragon?
Who will be victorious and how?

We think it would be wonderful to spend a summer’s evening in this garden – perhaps after a BBQ with a glass of your favourite drink in hand – inviting family and friends to tell the rest of the story. What do you think happens next? How would you end this great resc-yew story? Why not comment below and let us know!

As always, if you feel inspired by this week’s featured carving, you can talk to Simon about commissioning something unique for your home and garden. Contact us on [email protected].