welsh

Wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke. A large piece of timber stands horizontally with the logo for BIFOR carved inti it by simon o'rourke

Wood Logos and Emblems

Wood Logos and Emblems 2048 1158 Simon O'Rourke

This week on Twitter we posted a flashback to the time Simon created this fantastic logo for Olfi. We started thinking about other wood logos and emblems Simon has made. We had fun looking back, so decided to share some in this blog. Who knows, maybe you’ll feel inspired for your own company or organisation! Oh! Full story about the Olfi logo and Simon’s partnership with them right HERE!

Free-standing Sculptures

Some of the logos and emblems Simon has made, have been free standing sculptures. These are usually large and indicate an entrance or building. We feel it’s especially worth considering a wooden sculpture if your building is in a wooded or green environment. The sculpture is much more sympathetic to its surroundings than something metal or plastic, and much more pleasing to the viewer. It’s also a more environmentally friendly option as Simon sources his timber from trees that have died or had to be removed or cut back for other reasons.

Wood logos and emblems by SImon O'Rourke: RSPB COnway. Four planks of wood stand around 4' tall with a bird and RSBP burned onto them. Three men stand behind the sign.

This RSPB sign is our first example of Simon’s free-standing wood logos and emblems. The sustainability of word ties in with the organisation’s ethos, and it looks great against the background of this reserve. A wooden sculpture – even a logo! – actually makes a nice feature for people to stand next to and photograph themselves when they visit. Which in turn makes for more publicity for your organisation when people share their photos online. Makes it a bit of a win on many levels!

simon o'rourke kneels in front of a large piece of timber and uses a chainsaw to carve the logo for BIFOR into the wood

Simon working to create a sign for the Institute of Forest Research at the University of Birmingham.

Wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke. A large piece of timber stands horizontally with the logo for BIFOR carved inti it by simon o'rourke

National Emblems

Maybe you don’t want your name on a sign, but want something that still captures something of who you are or what you do. Here we have a couple of very different examples that show there really are wooden logos and emblems for everyone!!!

Our first example is this redwood carving of the Prince of Wales Feathers. Although it is English in origin, it has become synonymous with Wales and all things Welsh.  So much so, the Rugby fans among you will recognise it as the emblem on the national kits.

This particular emblem sculpture was for a housing development in North Wales. The words ‘Ich dien’ on the emblem mean ‘I serve’ (replaced with WRU on the rugby kits!). That made it even more fitting for this housing development which used to be an army barracks. And as someone once asked about the colour, no it didn’t stay pink!!! Redwood is a pink-ish red when it is first cut down and carved. Over time though, it turns a rich, deep brown. For examples, this article on Tongwnlais.com about my Fforest Ffawr Woodland Sculpture Trail has some lovely photographs of aging redwood sculptures.

Wood logos and emblems: 6' redwood carving of prince of wales feathers by Simon O'Rourke.

Local Logos

Our next examples are two of Simon’s charity fundraising pieces. You can read more in our blog ‘A New Bird in Town‘, but basically they were made to auction off at fundraising events for R Charity – the charity for The Royal Liverpool Hospitals. Local symbols like this can make great pieces for an office or garden, whether at home or for the community. When a sculptures represents the area the way these do, it’s also more likely to hold meaning and capture attention if you are looking for a piece for your own fundraiser. If you have a fundraiser coming up, why not chat to Simon via www.treecarving.com/contact/ and see if something similar could be what you need?

Two wooden sculptures of liverbirds are shown side by side. Sculptures are one of the wood logos and emblems made by Simon O'Rourke

Patrotic Art

Our next example of wood logos and emblems is this stunning Sri Lankan lion sculpture. It was commissioned as a combined birthday-retirement gift – and what an incredible gift!
You may (understandably!) be wondering how it ties in with wood logos and emblems. However, if you look closely, the lion is holding a sword – like the lion on the Sri Lankan flag!
Obviously the lion looks a little different to the one depicted on the flag! However, bringing a flag to life like this is a lovely way to honour/reflect your heritage in a piece of art. Another similar option could be to commission a sculpture of your national or regional flower, animal, or bird. Definitely lots of ways to bring a logo or emblem to life through sculpture!

My client and her husband with Singha the lionA Derby 

Spirit of Ecstasy

One of the largest wood logos and emblems Simon has made is this sculpture of The Spirit of Ecstasy. For those unfamiliar with the figure, she is the figurine found atop Rolls Royce cars. Simon created her for an enthusiast, and she makes a striking addition to the garden.
Just like the lion, she shows that a logo or emblem can still be a beautiful piece of art. It also shows again, that sculptures of logos and emblems aren’t just for places of business. Perhaps a Ferrari enthusiast in your life would like a prancing horse sculpture? Or maybe someone in your life is a fan of a sports team and you’d like something based on that? An owl for a Sheffield Wednesday fan? A Derby County ram? Whatever the hobby or interest, we’re sure there’s a way of turning it into a beautiful sculpture…

Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O'Rourke

Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O’Rourke

Wall Signs

Perhaps a sculpture isn’t quite for you. Another alternative would be a wall hanging, such as this lovely bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree project.

bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree centre by simon o'rourke

Many businesses, charities, community groups, churches and individuals look to have some kind of signage. Again, a wooden logo, emblem or signage makes a great environmentally-friendly/sustainable option compared to some of the alternatives. If you have a logo, this can be the entire sign (as with the Joshua Tree) or could be a much smaller reference, such as this company sign below.

wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke : sample wall hanging with the letter R carved into a corner and the rest blank for engraving a name or phrase

As you may remember, Simon also has a background in illustration. This means that he is also able to create beautiful and unique illustrations on wooden wall hangings. These could be incorporated into a sign for a home and could range from portraits of the residents to something that reflects the surroundings. How great would this cow be on an entrance sign to a farm or homestead?

illustrated wooden wall hanging by simon o'rourke

Your Own Wood Logos and Emblems

Whatever your company, community group, team or passion, we’re pretty sure there’s something Simon can create to meet your need! Whether you want a sculpture to reflect a company, country or activity or want specific signage, we welcome your inquiries.
Fill out the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will be in touch to discuss ideas and details. We look forward to hearing from you!

The finished head

Huskycup Through the Years

Huskycup Through the Years 3648 2736 Simon O'Rourke

An annual highlight in the chainsaw carving calendar is The Huskycup. Every summer chainsaw carvers from around the world descend on Blockhausen in Dorfschemnitz and the sawdust starts flying! We absolutely recommend a visit at least once in a lifetime! As you might expect, this summer’s event has sadly been cancelled. But never fear! Just like our series where we brought Simon’s woodland trails to your home (click here for Part One, Part Two and Part Three), we thought we would bring the Huskycup to you! Join us as we look back as Simon’s entries in the Huskycup through the years…

Huskycup through the years: participants in the 2019 huskycup showcase

Simon and the other participants from the 2019 Huskycup

About Blockhausen

Before we revisit Simon’s entries at the Huskycup through the years, we have to share a bit more about the place. It’s incredible!

Blockhausen had its beginnings in something very practical: a hut to store forest management material and hay. SO different to its current function! You can read the full story at https://www.blockhausen.de/geschichte-gebaeude/wie-alles-begann/ , but nowadays it’s a venue for chainsaw carving courses, forestry training, open air museum, events venue, holiday destination, and hiking trail. In fact, it’s home to the largest collection of chainsaw art in the world! Oh, and if that isn’t enough, it also has a pretty great snack bar/cafe! Public can visit all year round, and hire various buildings. Many of them incorporate some fantastic pieces of chainsaw carving, so it’s like staying in an art gallery!

At certain times of year though, it is transformed into an arena for some of the world’s best chainsaw carvers. The largest of these events being Huskycup…

The Huskycup Experience

Initially Huskycup was an annual competition. As we mentioned in our Huskycup flashback blog though, it is now an exhibition event/showcase, although there is still a speed carving competition. Artists team up to create incredible chainsaw carving exhibits that tie in with a given theme. Simon participated for the first time in 2007 and has returned several times since then. It’s definitely a favourite event! Although he was very successful in competition, Simon prefers the more relaxed atmosphere of the exhibition. Primarily, it enables artists to feel more relaxed as they carve. It also allows them to take more time to enjoy each other’s creations, and try things they may not if there was the ‘risk’ of it not working out when they were being judged. It means teams can be more varied too as they aren’t restricted to a geographical region. Whether a participant, chainsaw artist, or fan, Huskycup is a great event to attend for community, and inspiration.

Huskycup through the years: crowds entirely fill a path in the woodland with chainsaw artists set up in booths alongside the path, carving various dragons

Crowds in 2019. Photo taken from the Huskycup website.

Simon and the Huskycup through the Years: The Beginning…

Simon’s first Huskycup experience was in 2007. He had to apply to organiser Andreas by sending a design. There was no theme for this year. This is a bit of a double-edged sword! It’s great because it allows for SO much variation. However, it can also be tricky to know what’s going to appeal. Simon was up for the challenge though! He created a giant marionette that really moves! The sculpture placed fourth on the competition – pretty good for a first time competitor! It’s still installed at Blockhausen and remains a crowd-pleaser today.

Huskycup through the years - 2007. A giant marionette created in oak by chainsaw carver simon o'rourke

2007 entry: Giant marionette

Huskycup Through the Years: 2008

2008 Simon’s brief was to create a naked man and woman cuddling! It was another success and he placed fourth again. For those wanting to see the sculpture, you’ll need to visit Blockhausen! After the competition, it was installed in one of the haylofts where people can stay.

A life size oak sculpture by simon o'rourke of a naked man and woman reclining rogether

Simon’s 2008 Huskycup entry

Huskycup Through the Years: 2009

In 2009 Simon paired up with Sebastian Seiffert to make TEAM EUROPE! This year teams created columns that depicted stories and legends from their home continent. Simon and Sebastian opted for a Celtic theme. Rather than tell specific stories though, they decided to show the seasons of the year as people. This unique approach impressed the judges, and they placed second! Their columns joined the other competitors, and they became the pillars supporting one of the log cabins.

Column holding up a large wood cabin. Created by Simon O'Rourke with celtic knots and featuring a nude woman

celtic knot column featuring nude woman by simon o'rourke

 

nude man incorporated into illar featuring celtic knotwork by simon o'rourke

nude man incorporated into illar featuring celtic knotwork by simon o'rourke

Huskycup Through the Years: 2010

2010 brought Simon a live model, Knut! The theme was ‘Miners from the Ore region’, and each competitor had a model dressed in their various uniforms. Simon’s placed second again with his miner, meaning he had now placed four times out of five competitions.

Simon and Liz O'Rourke pictured with Knut, an miner from the ore region and his likeness that simon carved in oak at huskycup 2010

Simon and Liz pictured with Knut

The Long Table

Blockhausen’s founder Andreas is always up to something big though, and the 2010 Huskycup was no exception! Each of the miners created was to help support a canopy over the table at Blockhausen. Not just any table either. The table is actually in the Guinness Book of Records as the longest table in the world! For those wondering how big a table has to be to make a world record, it’s a whopping 39.8m! That’s the equivalent of 23 men of average height in Germany! It seats 200 people, weighs two tons, and it safely holds around 10,000 bottles of beer! That’s a lot of people, and a lot of beer. It’s also a LOT of fun as people gather and sit together to enjoy food and drink from the cafe. The process behind building the table is fascinating, and you can read more at https://www.blockhausen.de/geschichte-gebaeude/laengster-tisch-2010/. For now, enjoy the miners!

life size miners created by various chainsaw artists act as pillars for a canopy over a 40m table

The 2010 Huskycup pillars in place alongside the table, ready for the canopy

 

life size miners created by various chainsaw artists act as pillars for a canopy over a 40m table while a man sands the table

Sanding the giant table!

Huskycup Through the Years: 2012

Simon returned to the Huskycup in 2012 and teamed up with Tommy Craggs and Michael Tamozus to make TEAM EUROPE! They created an incredible piece depicting Christian and Martha from Sabine Obermaier’s book, The Midwife. Once again, the team did brilliantly and took third place.

Review of the decade: Christian & Martha Huskycup 2012 by O'Rourke, Cloggs and Tamoszus

Christian & Martha Huskycup 2012 by O'Rourke, Cloggs and Tamoszus

Walk of Fame!

2012 was also the year that Simon entered the Blockhausen Walk of Fame! Just like the Hollywood version, it’s an honour to have your name on a star in the Blockhausen Walk of Fame. Unveiling is usually a big event!

Chainsaw artist SImon o'Rourke kisses his star in the blockhausen walk of fame

Huskycup Through the Years: 2016

The 2016 Huskycup was a memorable one for Simon because he took first place. The theme was Vikings, which left plenty of room for creative storytelling – something Simon LOVES to do. He depicted a daughter being taken away by a Viking warrior, while the father grieves. A moving scene! And, just as Simon is often inspired by classical artists such as Rodin,  this scene has hints of Michaelangelo’s “Creation of Adam” in the way the father reaches for his daughter as she is carried away. Winter or summer, it makes a striking exhibit in the Blockhausen open-air exhibition. We shared more about this in our blog about the 2016 and 2018 Huskycup, or you can check out the Viking Raid case study on the website to find out more.

 

Viking Raid at Huskycup 2016 by Simon o'Rourke

Viking Raid, Huskycup 2016

Viking Raid, Huskycup 2016

viking raid sculpture by Simon O'Rourke in the snow

 

Huskycup Through the Years:

By 2018 the Huskycup was no longer a competition. Rather, a showcase event. The theme was once again ‘Miners’. This time however, the finished pieces had a slightly different purpose. Rather than holding up a cabin or canopy, they were going to form that year’s Nativity scene. Simon’s task was to carve two miners that would eventually be two of the three wise men visiting the stable. You’ll see from the pictures that by now Simon had been introduced to Saburrtooth. Their burrs have enabled him to take his facial details to a whole new level! They now form a staple part of his tool collection along with his faithful Stihl chainsaws and Manpa multi cutter and angle grinder.
Once again he had live models, and they looked pretty happy with the finished sculptures of themselves!

Huskycup through the years: Simon O'Rourke Working on details of the miners at Huskycup 2018

Working on details of the miners at Huskycup 2018

 

Working on details of the miners at Huskycup 2018

Using a Saburrtooth burr to create the eyes of a miner

The finished Miners, Huskycup 2018

The finished Miners, Huskycup 2018

Huskycup Through the Years: 2019

2019 was another amazing Huskycup for Simon, as you’ll know if you ready our Huskycup 2019 blog. He teamed up with Keiji Kikodoro, where they had the task of creating a sculpture with the theme ‘dragons’. Simon’s relationship with Keiji goes back years, and he has been privileged to carve with him in Japan. As regular followers know, Simon has MANY dragons in his portfolio, and is something of an expert dragon carver. His most recent dragon sculpture even breathes fire! He wanted something completely unique though for Huskycup 2019, and came up with this idea:

Initial sketch of Water Dragon by Simon O Rourke and Keiji. Learn these skills in our online art courses with Simon.

The initial concept sketch by Simon

When we look at the finished piece, we see glimpses of the way dragons are traditionally portrayed in the cultures of both artists, and there is no doubt that their teamwork created something fantastic. Even without the competition, this is a winner!

Water Dragon by Keiji Kidokoro and Simon O'Rourke Huskycup 2019

Water Dragon by Simon and Keiji at Huskycup 2019

Profile view of the finished Water Dragon

Profile view of the finished Water Dragon

The finished head

The finished head

Huskycup 2020

And what about Huskycup 2020?
Well, at this point it’s hard to say. Andreas has postponed the main event, and planned a ‘mini huskycup‘ for October of this year, but whether Simon can be there or not is very much up in the air. If it goes ahead, the theme is ‘Brothers Grimm’, and participants are free to choose either modern or traditional interpretation. What a lot of scope for amazing fantasy sculptures AND human form. Some of Simon’s favourite kind of projects!

Either way, we feel strongly that safety needs to come first, so we watch and wait, and will choose wisely at the time, within the regulations.

Even if it goes ahead, it will be with much reduced attendance. So, with little likelihood of you enjoying Husycup in person this year, we hope you enjoyed seeing Huskycup through the years from Simon’s perspective. If you can’t go the the event, we bring the event to you!

But seriously, if you can ever get there, we recommend attending a Huskycup. The atmosphere is amazing, the carving off the charts, and the venue stunning. Andreas has created an incredible destination, and a great event, and it’s definitely been a highlight to be part of the whole thing.

If you feel inspired by any of these sculptures to commission your own, contact Simon using the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/. We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Three Wise Dragons Arrive in Pwllheli

Three Wise Dragons Arrive in Pwllheli 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Well, we promised you a year of dragons, and we don’t like to disappoint! So here they are: “Three Wise Dragons”.

The Setting

The dragons were a commission from Hafan Y Mor Holiday Park in Pwllheli. They are part of the new Dragon Lakes Adventure Village which opens later this month. Eventually they’ll be surrounded by astro turf and other parts of the development, so don’t worry if they look a little out of place at the moment. In a few weeks when it’s finished, they will be the perfect backdrop for a holiday selfie!

The Three Wise Dragons at Dragon Lakes Adventure Village, Hafan-y-Mor, Pwllheli

The Three Wise Dragons at Dragon Lakes Adventure Village, Hafan-y-Mor, Pwllheli

The History

The full commission was for a bench and three dragons. Here we have a very lovable version of: ‘ Hear No Evil’, ‘See No Evil’ and ‘Speak No Evil’ – our Welsh twist on the traditional Japanese monkeys, we’re sure you’re familiar with. And now for some trivia!

The saying itself dates back to the 2nd or 3rd century. It was actually a 17th century wooden carving though that made the characters famous. We already thought it was fitting to have a dragon version for Wales. Once we discovered that, we thought it even more fitting that we’re continuing that tradition of carving them in wood.

 

Hear No Evil from The Three Wise Dragons at Hafan Y Mor

Hear No Evil – Clywed Dim Drwg

 

See No Evil from The Three Wise Dragons at Hafan Y Mor

See No Evil – Gweld Dim Drwg

 

Speak No Evil from The Three Wise Dragons at Hafan Y Mor

Speak No Evil – Dweud Dim Drwg

Let Sleeping Dragons Lie

The commission also included a dragon bench. In keeping with being a family venue, and wanting the dragons to seem fun and approachable for children, this docile looking chap is even taking a nap! Perfect spot for a bit of a breather while the kids play, or snapping a family photo.

Sleeping Dragon Bench

The Location

‘Hafan Y Mor’ means ‘sea haven’. It seems an appropriate name for this spot in Pwllheli – a Llyn Peninsula market town which has won several awards for its beaches an marina.

Before we finish for this week, we’re intrigued to know: which one is your favourite? Comment below to tell us!

Don’t forget, you can also commission your own dragon by emailing [email protected]