trees and botanical sculptures

giant pinecone sculpture by simon o'rourke

Giant Pinecone Sculpture

Giant Pinecone Sculpture 450 600 Simon O'Rourke

Last week Simon created something very different to his usual style: a giant pinecone sculpture! Did you see it on Facebook or Instagram? It definitely caught his followers’ attention, with comments including:
“Amazing”, “unbelievably awesome”, “wonderful” and “in awe”.  Read on to find out the story behind the sculpture…

 

giant pinecone sculpture by simon o'rourke

This giant pinecone sculpture has been popular since Simon revealed it on social media last week

A Giant Pinecone Sculpture: The Client’s Story

Simon’s client had a Monterey Cypress tree with a tree protection order on it. However, it was shedding branches close to the road. It was a danger to traffic in the area and needed to be cut back. Simon’s client took the necessary steps and received permission to cut the tree back for safety reasons. Please note, if you have a tree with a protection order that has become dangerous, it’s important you take the right steps to get that order amended or revoked.

The client used tree surgeon Harry, from Dedham Vale Tree Surgery, a tree surgeon who sometimes works with Simon. When Harry heard that the client would like to turn the remaining stump into a feature, he recommended Simon. The client made contact and commissioned the giant pinecone sculpture.

 

simon o'rourke standing on scaffolding working on his giant pinecone sculpture with a chainsaw

Simon at work on the giant pinecone sculpture

Choosing a Subject for Sculpture

Sometimes the choice for a sculpture subject is deeply personal. Sometimes it’s symbolic. Other times it’s historic. Or represents a passion, hobby or quirk. This time, however, the choice of a pinecone was really very simple. The client wanted the sculpture to stand out as a feature, and continue the legacy of the rather impressive Monterey Cypress when it had been at its peak. The stump is surrounded by other pines and firs, so the client had the idea of a giant pinecone sculpture!

 

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke stands next to a 6' tree stump being carved into a giant pinecone sculpture

Simon with the sculpture in progress

Creating the Giant Pinecone Sculpture

Although the concept of the pinecone may seem more simple than some of Simon’s sculptures, it was definitely a challenge! Partly because it was SO HUGE! And partly because it was hard to maintain symmetry.

Simon found it helped with the shaping to draw a circle on the top and mark the sides with horizontal lines at specific measurements.

Once the cone shape was done, he then divided up each row around the shape into sections and drew the diagonal lines in. It was only then that he could start cutting the pattern!
He used the cordless MSA200 saws to create the general pattern, then used Manpa cutters to create most of the 3D spines on the cone.
Finally, it was onto Saburrtooth burr discs on the angle grinder to round off all the edges and get it looking tidy.
giant pinecone sculpture by simon o'rourke

The Finished Sculpture

The final piece is bold and striking and definitely meets the requirement of being a key feature piece. The client wanted something that would be a fitting replacement for the beautiful tree that had stood there before, and the pinecone sculpture is certainly that.  It stands around 6′ tall and (if you’re a cypress lover!) will also smell amazing for a while yet! Simon’s client is extremely happy with the finished piece, describing it as ” a piece of art”.
Do you have a diseased or dangerous tree that you would like to turn into a sculpture?
Contact Simon using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact.
an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture: Dance with the Devil

An Abstract Chainsaw Carving Sculpture

An Abstract Chainsaw Carving Sculpture 450 600 Simon O'Rourke

Earlier this month Simon had the opportunity to create an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture. It’s a little different to his usual style, so we thought we’d share a little more in this blog. Don’t forget to leave a comment to let us know what you think!

 

an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture by simon o'rourke  hidien within the branches of an oak tree

About the Tree

One of the things Simon loves about his work is being able to give life back to dead trees in the form of art. In this case though, it is about extending the life of the tree.
The sculpture is within an old oak tree that’s been decaying over time. Its roots are undermined by a stream, and over time, the tree will no longer be viable. However, reduction will lengthen its life a little. And if a tree must be reduced, why not do it with style… and a sculpture?!

 

woman's face hidden within an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture

 

About the Subject

The client originally gave Simon the theme “Dance with the Devil”. Simon has created figures within the branches to convey that theme. It’s perhaps more reminiscent of a dryad and Dionysus (Bacchus in Roman culture) than typical portrayals of the devil.  As well as the main figures, he’s created some hidden elements in the tree too: twisted monsters and hidden faces.

 

close up of a woman's face carved into an oak branch

Creating an Illusion

The main figures are a bit of an optical illusion that can only be seen from one angle. There’s one sweet spot especially, where they really stand out. From other angles, they look like a dead tree which is what Simon and the client wanted.

 

an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture of bacchus

The figures are only intended to be seen from certain angles

What Makes This an Abstract Chainsaw Carving Sculpture?

Simon often carves in an impressionist style. So what is it that makes this abstract?
Abstract art makes no attempt to represent an accurate depiction of visual reality. Rather, it uses shapes, colours, forms and gestural marks to achieve its effect.

In the case of this sculpture, the idea of dance or movement is created by the shapes of the branches rather than an actual scene with clear characters. The faces are carved within the branches and don’t have anatomically accurate bodies. The entire piece is about creating an impression rather than an obvious depiction.

 

close up of an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture of bacchus by simon o'rourke

 

What Happens With the New Growth?

We’ve mentioned before that as they’re made from wood, all of Simon’s sculptures will change over time. It’s even more true in this case, as the tree is still growing beneath the sculpture! That will definitely change the appearance over time, as with any environmental art. Simon has created several sculptures on this estate (including the Oak Maiden, Oak Father, and Hydra) and will return in the future. When he does, he will see how the tree is growing, and how the sculpture looks because of those changes. At that point, he may add some more figures or ‘tweak’ some of the shapes. Watch this space to see what happens!

 

an abstract chainsaw carving sculpture in an oak tree depicts greek mythological figures in a dance

An Abstract Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Final Thoughts

It’s always nice as an artist to have a fresh challenge! What do you think of Simon’s abstract sculpture? And what do you see in the branches? Drop us a comment and let us know!

And, as always, use the contact form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ if you would like to commission your own sculpture.

george clark stands next to sculpter simon o'rourke. they are in front of a small brick building with a redwood fire breathing dragon mounted on the wall. the dragon is made of redwood and was one of simon's sculptures of 2020

Sculptures of 2020

Sculptures of 2020 960 1280 Simon O'Rourke

HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Wishing you all a healthy and prosperous 2021 with much less turbulence than 2020. Thank you to all those who have continued to support us through this year through commissions, sharing, commenting. We value you all.
Before launching into 2021, here is a month by month highlight of Simon’s sculptures of 2020…

sculptures of 2020: close up of the face of a lion. Carved by Simon O'Rourke

This lion was one of Simon’s last sculptures of 2020

 

SCULPTURES OF 2020: JANUARY

January started with some smaller projects including one which is still a secret! The ‘highlight’ we’ve chosen though is The Marbury Lady. She was commissioned to give life back to an elm that had sadly died from saline poisoning. She’s in a public location in Marbury Park, so if you are in Cheshire you can enjoy a walk and see her in person.

simon o'rourke's sculptures of 2020: photo shows the marbury lady in northwich

SCULPTURES OF 2020: FEBRUARY

For February’s highlight, we’ve chosen this hiker. He was commissioned to stand on a disused platform at Prestatyn Railway Station. The plan was to install and unveil him in March, but then a global pandemic hit, and you know the rest! As things begin to open up again though it will be possible for travellers to Prestatyn to view the sculpture.

Life size oak culpture of a hiker carrying a backpack. He leans on a signpost. One of Simon O'Rourkes sculptures of 2020

SCULPTURES OF 2020: MARCH

March was the month that the UK turned upside down! The rumours and stories from other countries suddenly became our story too. Before lockdown happened though, Simon was able to complete a few sculptures, including George and the Dragon. Our chosen highlight though is this massive Oak Maiden on a private estate in Surrey. The tree had died, and Simon was able to create this stunning oak maiden using the natural fall of the oak tree’s shape as inspiration. In this photo the oak maiden isn’t finished yet, but we love the way it gives a sense of scale. Also featuring one of Simon’s trusty Stihl chainsaws used to make the sculpture!

simon o rourke stands in a cherry picker next to the oak maiden sculpture he created in a dead oak tree. sculptures of 2020.

SCULPTURES OF 2020: APRIL

During April the workshop was closed, and Simon wasn’t working on commissions. This first lockdown gave him opportunity to work on another project though: his art coaching. During the month, Simon created the first in a series of teaching videos available at https://artcoach.teachable.com/
If you are interested in an online art course and not sure if this is the one for you, there is also a short free course there for you to ‘try before you buy’. Find out more in this video!

SCULPTURES OF 2020: MAY

May saw Simon return to carving in his own garden. His first piece was this beautiful, serene memorial sculpture. As an artist being able to help people grieve and heal is a real privilege, so this felt like a special piece. The full story is at https://www.treecarving.co.uk/a-memorial-sculpture-for-robyn/.

sculptures of 2020 by simon o'rourke. A girl is depicted as a fairy sitting surrounded by greenery. A robin sits on her hand as if in conversation with her.

SCULPTURES OF 2020: JUNE

For June we had a couple of sculptures to choose from, but how could we not settle on Maggon the Dragon?! Maggon is a fire breathing dragon commissioned for a holiday rental property in north wales. The property known as The Dragon Tower is INCREDIBLE and even features a folding bathroom. Really! It was featured on George Clark’s Amazing Spaces, which meant Simon also made a small appearance. You can watch the full episode HERE.

george clark stands next to sculpter simon o'rourke. they are in front of a small brick building with a redwood fire breathing dragon mounted on the wall. the dragon is made of redwood and was one of simon's sculptures of 2020

SCULPTURES OF 2020: JULY

Usually, Simon cuts into trees. In July he had to create one! It was commissioned for the entrance to the new Ronald McDonald House in Oxford, and created from one of the trees cleared from the land used for the property. It will hold leaves that bear the names of donors, hence its name: The Giving Tree. Families using the house are often going through some of their hardest times, so being asked to create something which helps to create a beautiful environment for them was an honour.

the giving tree by simon o'rourke

SCULPTURES OF 2020: AUGUST

OK, so this one is a little bit of a cheat, as most of it was created in July. But right at the start of August, Simon finished an exciting sculpture: The Ent at Poulton Hall. Simon loves fantasy and fiction and it ties into his training as an illustrator. There was a historic link between the residents of Poulton Hall and J RR Tolkien, so creating something from Tolkien’s works for the property was a lovely connection. The Ent has been one of Simon’s most popular works of the year, and can be viewed by the public when the grounds are open for visitors. Check for dates at www.poultonhall.co.uk.

monkey puzzle ent sculpture by simon o'rourke. one of his sculptures of 2020

SCULPTURES OF 2020: SEPTEMBER

Are you still with us?!
September’s highlight is another fantasy sculpture. This time, a phoenix rising from the ashes. Made from cedar, it represents the client’s rise from depression. It was an honour to depict such a positive mental change.

phoenix carved into a cedar trunk by artist simon o'rourke, one of his sculptures of 2020

SCULPTURES OF 2020: OCTOBER

In October Simon returned to Poulton Hall to create a sculpture of another Tolkien character: Gollum. Simon is an incredible storyteller through his sculptures, and we love this depiction of Gollum startled whilst catching fish for his dinner. If you have ten minutes, this is a great video where Simon takes you through the process of creating the sculpture. If you prefer to read, why not check out this blog about the process of creating Gollum.

SCULPTURES OF 2020: NOVEMBER

Armistice Day.
11:00am on 11/11/1918.
A day the world should never forget.
Sadly there have been many wars fought since then, with so many lives lost or irrevocably changed, which means November 11th is always a somber occasion. During this year Simon went back and forth on this sculpture which he completed in November: A WWI soldier for public display in Cumbria. We don’t have the details yet, but once we do, we will let you know where you can view him, and take a moment to remember those who gave their lives for the sake of others’ freedom.

World War I soldier in oak. Carved by simon o'rourke.

SCULPTURES OF 2020: DECEMBER

December was a busy month as Simon worked on Christmas commissions as well as some other bigger projects. The workshop looked a little bizarre in all honest with everything from fairies to lions to aliens! As our highlight though we’ve chosen Simon’s final carving of 2020: The Old Oak Father.
The sculpture is on the same property as the Oak Maiden, and the client decided they were Father and daughter. As well as the story on the blog (linked above) you can also hear Simon’s thoughts in the video below if you have five minutes. If not, don’t worry – we’ve included a photo below too!

the old oak father sculpture by simon o'rourke

The Old Oak Father points across the fields to the Oak Maiden

FINAL THOUGHTS

We hope you’ve enjoyed this highlight reel of 2020. If you want to see more of Simon’s works from this year, you can visit his Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Instagram.
Although you can use any of these to contact Simon, we recommend using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/, especially if you are interested in a commission.
January and February are looking busy next year, so we’re looking forward to sharing some new sculptures with you in the next few weeks, depending how lockdown unfolds.

We hope and pray this year is a good one for each and every one of you, and you are blessed with health, joy, and peace throughout the year, no matter what it holds.

With love from Simon and the team

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke. the sculpture is photographed in the entrance to ronald mcdonald house, oxford

Giving Tree Sculpture for Ronald McDonald House

Giving Tree Sculpture for Ronald McDonald House 1824 1368 Simon O'Rourke

As lockdown opens up more and more, Simon has been able to finish more projects, and install more sculptures. Sometimes it’s only once in place that the sculpture truly comes to life. It always looks so different than it did in the workshop! We think you’ll agree that this Giving Tree sculpture for Ronald McDonald House is one of them…

Giving tree sculpture for Ronald McDonald House, Oxford by Simon O'Rourke

About the Client

The Giving Tree sculpture was commissioned by Ronald McDonald House for their new house in Oxford. You can read more about the history at https://rmhc.org.uk/about/our-history/, but the goal of the charity is to build and run houses on or near hospital sites where children are treated for chronic conditions. They provide a safe space in which the families of the children in the hospital can get proper rest, away from the ward. For many families, this is the only way to be close to their child during cancer treatment.

The charity has grown a lot since the first house was built in 1974. There are now services in 64 countries! The first house in the UK was built in 1989. Since then, the charity has helped around 50,000 families – including some known to us.

Work in progress. A photo of the giving tree sculpture for Ronald McDonal house by simon O'Rourke.

Work in progress in the workshop

Where The Giving Tree Sculpture Began…

Ever since the first Ronald McDonald House opened in the UK, they have always had a “giving tree” of some description. Its purpose is to recognise donors and supporters of the Charity.  Usually, this would be a 2d piece of artwork. It was typically made out of a flat carved piece of wood, which was then mounted on a board on the wall. Plaques were then added to the leaves as people donated.
In 2016, they opened a new house to replace that first house at Guy’s. The new house was located right next to Archbishops Park in Lambeth in London and had a lovely big reception area. It seemed like a good idea to make more of the tree, and effectively bring the park into the House.  The architects researched sculptors and their work, and they felt Simon fit the bill!

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke at Ronald McDonald Evelina House

The Giving Tree at Evelina House, Simon’s first commission for Ronald McDonald House charities

A Tree for Every House!

A few months later Simon also created a similar smaller tree for their new Cardiff House. So, when it came to the new Oxford house, the charity reached out to Simon again.
Unfortunately, they had to remove a small number of trees from the site before they could start work to build the new house. This meant there was already a supply of timber for a new giving tree sculpture! And so, the charity commissioned him to remove one of those trees and change it into the new “giving tree” for the new house. So basically the tree has returned to where it started!

the 'giving tree sculpture' by Simon o'rourke. the photo shows the tree in simon's workshop while it is in progress

Work in progress in the workshop!

The Process

It would make sense to think that a tree is one of the easiest things for Simon to make. Well, it turns out that’s not quite true! There is actually quite a bit of work that goes into transforming a tree into a sculpture like this. That work is a combination of engineering, technical, and creative skill.

In this case, Simon needed to trim, remove, and replace branches so it would be a specific width and height. Meeting a specification is always important. Even more so however when the sculpture is being installed indoors. In addition, this particular sculpture was for the entrance area in the new house. This means foot traffic! Which in turn means ensuring there is enough space surrounding the tree for the foot traffic to maneuver!

branches for the giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke

Recreating a Tree Continued…

Simon also needed to ensure the tree was easy to reassemble. No Ikea flatpack nightmares here!
The photo above shows the numbered branches on the workshop floor. Numbering parts in this way is extremely important. Where memory or a photo might be sufficient to get everything back in the right spot, numbers ensure that happens as quickly as possible. A definite bonus when they are working outside in the wind and rain!

Lastly, one of the most important parts of the process we’ll mention is one of the first things Simon does on every project. Stripping the bark. It sounds like something easy, but like many things in life, getting it right is actually a little more time-consuming. Compromising at this stage can impact the final result. So, if you are considering a similar project, you might find this article about stripping bark to be helpful.

the giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke installed in ronald mcdonald oxford house

Installed in its New Home…

Simon installed the Giving Tree sculpture in the Ronald McDonald Oxford house earlier this month. Although the house hasn’t had its official opening yet, the first guests transferred from the old house at the end of April.  Staff, patients, and guests are already enjoying the sculpture. Parents have taken to it in a very positive way. Dads, in particular, seem to like the way it’s been formed, and staff from the charity have had comments around how it compliments the space it sits in.

One of the nice things about the Giving Tree sculpture is that it will continually evolve as leaves are added over time, each with the name of a donor engraved. This adds a bit more interest for regular guests as they see it change over time, and mirrors the growth and change of a living tree.

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke. the sculpture is photographed in the entrance to ronald mcdonald house, oxford

Speaking of Donors…

Speaking of leaves and donors! The fundraising for the Oxford house is far from finished…

The charity is still raising money to finish the house itself. Areas like the kitchen and rest areas need furnishing and equipping. They also need gardening equipment to be able to manage the grounds. Like many charities, they have found that Covid has impacted the number of donations they are receiving.

With the new house opening, the Oxford branch can support and accommodate around 2500 families a year – a massive increase on the capacity of the old house. If you would like to make a financial donation (and maybe be one of the first leaves!), visit https://rmhc.org.uk/donate/your-donation/.

Other Trees and Charities

This isn’t the first tree themed charity entrance piece Simon has created. As well as the other Giving Tree sculptures for Ronald McDonald House, Simon has created other bespoke pieces such as this sign for the Joshua Tree. Interestingly, they also work with families of children with cancer.

bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree centre by simon o'rourke

If you like the idea of having your own giving tree sculpture to honour donors to your charity, or even just a similar piece for your own home, do contact us. You can email Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to talk about details, costing etc. Charities like the two we have mentioned do such incredible work, and it’s always a privilege for Simon to be involved in helping to create a beautiful environment for the people they serve.

Thank you to staff at Ronald McDonald House Charities for information and photos used in this blog.

Into the 20’s – A Review of the Decade

Into the 20’s – A Review of the Decade 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

As we start a new decade, we’ve been reflecting on the many changes that have happened personally and professionally over the last ten years. Professionally, it’s been a great decade with some fantastic opportunities and commissions. We’ve also met some amazing people and seen some wonderful places along the way. Before we move forward into the 20’s, we thought we would bring you our ‘review of the decade’. And, as we do, let us wish you a Happy New Year from all at Tree Carving.

Simon O'Rourke Game of Thrones Egg Carrier carving

Simon and Liz O’Rourke wish you a happy new year (and decade) on behalf of the Tree Carving team.

Review of the Decade: 2010

As we looked back, we could definitely see we didn’t use social media as much! And the technology we used definitely didn’t produce the kind of photos and videos we do today! But here is a look back at two competition pieces from that year, both taking second place. Neptune from the English Open Chainsaw competition, and a traditional miner from the Huskycup.
A quick glimpse at Simon’s awards shows that this was a good decade for competition, placing in most things he entered and winning seven awards. However, when it comes to competitions Simon says:
“Competitive sculpture has taught me a lot about completing work to a deadline. I have competed all over the world and although I have placed highly in many events, the most important thing to me is being happy with my own work.”

Neptune by Simon O'Rourke as featured in his review of the decade

Simon O'Rourke second place huskycup 2010

Review of the Decade: 2011

Two of the projects we chose as highlights from 2011 are The Giant Hand of Vrynwy, and the Somerset Tree.

At 50′ tall, it was no wonder the hand caught the attention of the local press, as you can see in the article by The Leader newspaper. Simon’s inspiration for the hand came from the name for the woodland area, which made reference to giants. Creating something on this scale reminded Simon how small we are compared to some of the living organisms on this planet. He described the experience as being very humbling!

Giant hand by Simon O'Rourke

The next project although tall still, was a little smaller in scale! Simon was commissioned by the Museum of Somerset to create this stunning tree for their new museum. Sourced from local wood, it stands proudly in the museum where it tells some of the area’s 400 million year history.

Tree of Somerset by Simon O'Rourke

Review of the decade: Tree of Somerset by Simon O'Rourke

Review of the Decade: 2012

Another Huskycup entry! This time, the sculpture of “Christian and Mary”. Simon worked on this piece as part of ‘Team Europe’ with Tommy Craggs and Michael Tamoszus. They placed fourth overall, with some tough competition from a great bunch of talented artists. As we had a quick glimpse back at the Facebook album of the event it was lovely to be reminded of the support, encouragement and lovely comments.

Christian & Martha Huskycup 2012 by O'Rourke, Cloggs and Tamoszus

Review of the decade: Christian & Martha Huskycup 2012 by O'Rourke, Cloggs and Tamoszus

fourth place Huskycup 2012 by O'Rourke, Cloggs and Tamoszus

Review of the Decade: 2013

For our 2013 highlight, we chose something a little different. During that year Simon created this incredible Alice in Wonderland booth for Steak of the Art in Bristol. Their vision is for the restaurant to be an ever-changing art gallery that compliments their delicious menu. As you can see from the photos in the case study Simon wrote, his booth more than fits their vision. Every single character is its own work of art, and with so much to see, although the piece doesn’t change, there is something new to notice each time you sit within it. Here we get a reflection of the changing technology too, with this timelapse video of its making!

Alice in Wonderland booth at Steak of the Art by Simon O'Rourke (a review of the decade)

Alice in Wonderland booth by Simon O'Rourke, Steak of the Art

Alice in Wonderland booth by Simon O'Rourke, Steak of the Art

Review of the Decade: 2014

2014 saw us receive a lot of publicity for two ‘guardians’.

The first was created for the ‘Pawtraits‘ series by Maria Slough, and was actually named ‘The Guardian‘. The series featured people photographed alongside animals that had impacted their lives, and Simon was brought in to create a piece to be used for the portrait of Virginia McKenna. Understandably, the actress wasn’t too keen on reclining on a real lion – hence Simon stepping in with The Guardian! As McKenna was so impressed with his work, Simon was later commissioned to sculpt a lion cub for the Born Free Foundation charity auction, a charity McKenna established. As well as the photos below, you can click HERE to see a timelapse of The Guardian being made.

 

The Guardian by Simon O'Rourke

Maria Slough Pawtrait Virginia McKenna featuring lion by Simon O'Rourke

Photograph copyright of Maria Slough from the Pawtraits Series

The other ‘guardian’ created by Simon that year is just as iconic. Phil and Leah from Wahoo Group wanted to harness the power of social media and do something novel to help sell their home. Thinking completely outside of the box (no baked cookies here!) they commissioned a sculpture of…..Batman!

The caped crusader sat on top of their home where it gained attention from both local and global news outlets, and helped the couple find tenants for their property.

Wooden Batman carving by Simon O'Rourke

Wooden Batman carving by Simon O'Rourke

Batman by Simon O'Rourke and St Giles Church Wrexham

As one of Simon’s strengths is Human Form, we also couldn’t resist throwing in this sculpture of Scottish explorer, Mungo Park. He was commissioned for a pub in the explorer’s hometown of Peebles, and sits on this bench for passers by to enjoy.

Review of the decade 2014 Mungo Park

 

 

Review of the decade 2014 Mungo Park

Review of the Decade: 2015

2015 was the year when Simon won the English Open Chainsaw Competition with Hemlock the Dragon.

Since then Hemlock has made countless appearances around the country, including at a wedding! Hemlock has recently had some repair work on the wings, and is ready to meet the public again. If you are interested in hiring Hemlock for your event, just email us on [email protected]

Hemlock the Dragon English Open Chainsaw Competition 2015 by Simon O'Rourke

Review of the Decade: 2016

2016’s highlight is another Huskycup Flashback: Viking Raid.

As well as the Viking Raid Case Study Simon wrote, we also have a blog about Viking Raid for those who want to know more. As we mentioned in our Huskycup 2019 blog, 2016 was actually the last year Huskycup was a competition. It meant Simon was the last ever Huskycup champion, as Viking Raid took first place. What a way to end the competition for him! Although it is no longer a competition, Simon continues to participate, and it is something of a highlight each year.

In 2016 Simon also became an affiliate of Olfi. We love their action cameras, and how they’ve transformed what we’re able to share with you through timelapse videos. Find out more in our Olfi blog!

Viking Raid at Huskycup 2016 by Simon o'Rourke

 

 

Viking Raid at Huskycup 2016 by Simon o'Rourke

 

Review of the Decade: 2017

2017’s highlight is from Liverpool. Simon created a tribute to The Beatles by carving life size figures of the Fab Four live along the dockside over a weekend. You can read more about the event in our Global Beatles Day Blog, and keep scrolling to enjoy our flashback photos and video.

2017 was also the year Simon began being sponsored by Stihl. Not only do they manufacture quality equipment, but it was something of a ‘full circle’ for Si, as his very first chainsaw experience was using Stihl equipment.

 

Beatles at the Liverpool dockside by Simon O'Rourke

 

Nearly done!!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Monday, 28 August 2017

 Review of the Decade: 2018

As Simon says in his case study about the Spirit of Ecstasy, this was one of his most challenging sculptures to date.
You may remember from our Spirit of Ecstasy blog, that Simon recreated the Rolls Royce icon for an enthusiast to give new life and purpose to a beautiful oak tree which had died. Despite the challenges, the finished piece was faithful to the Rolls Royce concept, graceful and simply stunning. We hope you enjoy the finished result as much as we (and most importantly, the client!) did.

Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O'Rourke

 

 

Review of the Decade: 2019

In our new year blog at the start of last year, we told you 2019 would be our ‘year of the dragon’. We weren’t wrong! Over the year Simon created seven new dragon-related carvings, including an ice dragon in our local town.
It all started off with The Dragon of Bethesda. It sits in an arboretum in North Wales after the landowner commissioned Simon to create something spectacular from a fallen tree. Y Ddraig Derw was featured in national media, and we are still overwhelmed by the encouraging response from so many people to the piece.

Dragon of Bethesda by Simon O'Rourke

 

Our other dragon highlight from the year, is this stunning casket created for HBO’s Game of Thrones.

Game of Thrones egg props Simon O'Rourke

Simon was commissioned by HBO as part of a wider project where artists re-imagined original props from the show. He received these beautiful dragon eggs, and created the casket for them to sit in. You can remind yourself of the whole project and process in our Game of Thrones blog.

Again, we were amazed, thankful and VERY encouraged by all the positive comments we received.

This is also the year Simon became an affiliate for ManpaTools. Their angle grinders especially have taken some of his texture and detail to a whole new level.

Simon O'Rourke casket Game of Thrones Season Eight

Moving into 2020, Simon has also become an affiliate for Saburrtooth. With quality tools and equipment from Stihl, Manpa and Saburr, Simon’s talent and creativity, and the continued support of all our amazing clients and co-workers, we look forward to what the next decade – the roaring 20’s – will hold.

We hope you enjoyed our Review of the Decade. We definitely loved seeing some of these pieces afresh as we looked back.
As always, if you have a project in mind, email us on [email protected]