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Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

Back in February Simon began posting photos of a Lion sculpture Ihewas working on. Last week he was able to deliver and install the finished piece. Keep reading to find out more about the Sri Lankan Lion sculpture!

a 12' sri lankan lion sculpture in oak in progress. the head is carved but the rest is stripped timber with scaffolding in the foreground

Early work on the Sri Lankan Lion

 

The Beginning….

Simon was first contacted by this client at the end of 2019. She was looking for a unique and significant gift for her husband’s retirement after 32 years working in the NHS. They had seen and admired the Dragon of Bethesda and initially reached out to ask about something similar.
Initially they talked about a lion-dragon combination. This would certainly have given lots of room for Si’s imagination!

A Sri Lankan Lion sculpture in oak by simon o'rourke against a vivid sunset. The lion holds a sword as he does on the sri lankan flag.

Progress on the Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

Evolution of an Idea

Deciding a final design is often a conversation though, and progression of ideas. This commission was no different. Early on, the client assessed their garden to see if they had any trees suitable to be carved as they stood. This is a great starting point, and it saves the step of sourcing timber. The shape, size, and unique characteristics of that tree are then the starting point for a design. In this case, there were no trees suitable though. The client realised too that they would rather have a free-standing sculpture so it could move with them if they ever moved.
We sourced a large piece of oak from JRB Tree & Timber Services, and work began!

felled oak tree wth a stihl chainsaw

The chainsaw is here to show the girth of the tree used for the Sri Lankan lion sculpture

 

15' oak on the back of a trailer ready for transportation

Ready to be brought to the workshop!

Behind the Lion…

The client had come back to Simon at this point and settled on the idea of a Sri Lankan lion sculpture. Her husband is half-Irish, half-Sri Lankan and is proud of his heritage. The flag of Sri Lanka features a lion, and he even has a tattoo of this lion on his shoulder! This gave Simon a great starting point.

The lion on the Sri Lankan flag has been around since around 500bc and was seen carrying a sword from around 160bc.  The lion represents strength and bravery, and the ethnicity of the Sinhlaese people, so Simon’s lion sculpture needed to reflect that same strength. No cute and cuddly Disney Simbas for this sculpture! That pose, the clear muscle and the pose are striking and awesome, in the true sense of the word. A definite depiction of the bravery and strength the lion represents. And carrying a sword makes it clear this is the lion of the Sri Lankan flag.
By the way, if you enjoy learning about the history and symbolism of flags, you can find out more about the symbolism in the Sri Lankan flag on this blog.

An oak sri lankan lion sculpture by artist Simon O'Rourke depicting a 'real life' version of the sri lankan lion holding a sword. The lion is in the workshop surrounded by tools and carving paraphernalia

The finished lion in the workshop

Creating the Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

As you can see from the previous photos which show the lion in progress, Simon began with a rough outline of the lion. The first areas he started cutting detail into were the mane and face. This is important, as they were to be the focal point of the sculpture. Starting with them makes it easier to ensure the rest matches them,  rather than making the focal point fit something that is less important in terms of focus. By carving them first, Simon really can make sure that everything else about the sculpture compliments and directs the viewer’s gaze towards the ‘main feature’.

Gradually he was able to add more details, with attention being given to even the tiniest aspect of this Sri Lankan Lion sculpture. Check out his lion dentistry with the Saburrtooth coarse flame bit

A bit of careful dentistry!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Saturday, 22 February 2020

In fact, Simon used the full arsenal of power tools on this commission! Here he is using the Manpa Tools Multicutter tool with the triangle head to create the lion’s fur. For those wondering where to get their own, Manpa Tools are not easily available in the UK, but Simon sources them through www.chainsawbars.co.uk. We thoroughly recommend Chainsawbars as a company too, as you can find out in our blog  Collaboration with Chainsawbars.co.uk.

Using the Manpa tools Multicutter with the triangle cutter head to create fur texture.

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Tuesday, 11 February 2020

A Roaring Success

Seven months on from the first conversation, and Singha the Sri Lankan Lion sculpture (named after the Sinhalese people and meaning ‘Lion’) is in his new home. He looks magnificent in place. Most importantly though, the couple love him, describing him as ‘absolutely wonderful’ and ‘fabulous’.
32 years of service to the NHS is no small thing. This Sri Lankan lion sculpture is a wonderful gift to recognise that service and honour their heritage.

Sri Lankan Lion sculpture by simon o'rourke standing in a paved area of a private garden

 

12' oak sri lankan lion sculpture by simon o'rourke pictured with the clients in a paved area

The client and her husband with Singha the lion

A Unique Gift

If you are looking for your own unique, significant, and personal gift, we would love to hear from you. Contact us via the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will get back to you to chat about design and costs.

 

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Last night Simon was on ‘home territory’ as he took part in the annual Victorian Christmas market in Wrexham. Don’t worry though, he hasn’t traded his chainsaw for a stall and money pouch! Simon’s contribution to the evening was much cooler, if we do say so ourselves. He swapped timber for something much wetter, and did some ice carving for Wrexham Museum.

Crowds watching ice carving for Wrexham Museum

Outside Wrexham Museum*

About the Victorian Market

Wrexham’s Christmas Market has become one of the most eagerly awaited events in the town’s calendar and successfully attracts thousands of shoppers year after year.  This year there was a Victorian theme to the market with Punch and Judy shows throughout the day, and period street performers. The main feature though was 100 stalls from Queens Square right up to and inside St Giles’ Church.

Punch and Judy show at Wrexham Victorian Christmas Market

Punch & Judy on Hope Street

About Ice Carving for Christmas

To coincide with the event, Wrexham Museums also organised and hosted an event: Ice Carving for Christmas. As well as Simon’s ice carving, the museum was open for the public and people could do Christmas shopping in the gift shop and enjoy a hot chocolate or mulled wine in the cafe. Various school choirs performed, including Bryn Hafod Primary who sang in both Welsh and English, and Libby and Sign of the Times. As you can see from the first photo we shared, plenty of people came to enjoy the evening.

Crowds watching Simon O'Rourke Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

Crowds watching Simon Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum*

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

If you read the blog we wrote a couple of weeks ago about the event (visit it here) then you’ll know Simon didn’t just complete one carving. The Ice carving for Wrexham Museum was actually a trail through the town. It began at St Giles church, where most of the market stalls were located, and ended at the Museum.

In the first location, Simon began by carving one block of ice, which was a clue as to what the final ice sculpture would be. People could then follow him to second location where he carved a second block, giving people a second clue.

They could then follow him to the museum where they could submit their guesses as to what his final carving would be, and any correct answers won a prize.

*spoiler alert*

For those who know that 2019 was a year full of dragons for us, it will come as no surprise that the final sculpture was this stunning dragon head.

It lives!! The dragon head, complete with smoke!!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Thursday, 5 December 2019

Let us take you back though through the evening as the audience experienced it though…..

Setting up:

Working in the multiple areas gave Simon and Paul the first challenge of the night – getting all the equipment through the thousands of people attending the Victorian Market! They had everything loaded up on a cart, and the high vis jackets definitely helped them get noticed so the crowds could part a little. It definitely wasn’t the quickest or easiest transportation of equipment though!

Paul and Simon making their way through the crowds attending the market!

Simon O'Rourke safety jacket

Paul and Simon making their way through the crowds attending the market!

St Giles Location

The first location was St Giles church where Simon carved this stunning dragon’s eye. Standing it the crowd, it was fun to be able to hear people’s awe as they watched. Especially as the chain saw went all the way through the ice to carve the space that became the eye! Several people were also commenting on how clear the ice was. Many guessed correctly that we didn’t just freeze water from our hosepipe to make the blocks. Rather, they are especially made for events like this. There’s a science behind it, but you can actually do it at home! Read all about how crystal clear ice is made at Barschool.Net. We’re happiest to leave it to the professionals, but if you try it yourselves, let us know if it works!

As we have said before, it is the lighting that makes the difference when ice carving. This green lighting reflecting off the scales Simon created is definitely eerie and mysterious, which helped add to the sense of mystery and anticipation of what the final carving would be.

Viewers outside St Giles*

Early on in the work on the dragon’s eye

Simon O'Rourke working on an ice carving of a dragon's eye, Wrexham 2019

Adding textured to create the scales*

Dragon eye at Ice Carving for Wrexham by Simon O'Rourke

The finished dragon’s eye*

Henblas Square

The second location of the night was Henblas Square.
Here, as well as the general admiration of what Simon was doing, I could hear many more questions about the equipment.

“His hands must be freezing” was also a pretty common theme!

Unlike most people were thinking, Simon wasn’t using specialist ‘ice carving’ equipment. He used his faithful Stihl battery powered chainsaws (complete with the handy backpack you will have noticed for the battery packs) for most of the initial carving. This meant they were lightweight and didn’t need a power supply. Perfect for this kind of mobile evening. He also used his Manpa tools angle grinder, with burr bits by Saburrtooth. And, while we’re speaking of Saburrtooth, we’re excited to announce Simon will become one of their ambassadors in 2019!

It was nice to see so many people stay and watch the entire carve here. For a long time people were guessing it was going to be eagles, rather than (as you can see) this amazing dragon claw (clue number two)! It really is fascinating to watch, but the audience were also encouraged to stay by the unusually warm evening. After several nights of hard frost, it was 10°c! Although being a warmer night was helpful for the audience and shoppers, the warmer weather meant Simon had to carve extra fast as the ice was melting far more quickly that he’d hoped!

Simon O'Rourke ice carving: dragon claw

Simon o Rourke Ice Carving for Wrexham Museums 2019 Dragon Claw

The finished dragon claw, clue number two in the ice carving trail

The finished dragon claw, clue number two in the ice carving trail*

Wrexham Museum

The museum location was the longest of Simon’s carves, and he used six blocks of ice rather than the one that he used at the other locations. Even before he arrived, people were fascinated by the ice on the museum forecourt.

ice blocks for carving wrexham museum 2019

Blocks of ice waiting for carving!

Simon was challenged here not only by the ice melting in the warmer weather, but also an impressive wind. At one point the leaves spiraling in the air looked like a scene from The Wizard of Oz! It didn’t put people off watching though, and in some cases it was hard for parents to pry their children away.

Ice Carving for Wrexham museum 2019

Watching outside Wrexham Museum*

Simon o'Rourke ice carving dragon Wrexham 2019

Adding texture with an angle grinder

Simon O'Rourke adding detail to an ice carving dragon, Wrexham 2019

Adding detail to the dragon

One of the perks of Simon being on ‘home turf’ is being able to watch him. Another is being able to hear and see other people’s reactions. The audiences at all the locations were a mix of people who have followed Simon and his work for years, and others who had never even imagined creating something with a chainsaw!

“The precision is unbelievable”

“I’m so impressed with the talent and detail he is able to produce with a chainsaw”

“I’ve never seen anything like it before. It’s bold and beautiful”

“I was only going to stay ten minutes but once I started watching, I had to stay until the end”

“The detail is unbelievable”

“Stunning. Simply stunning”

We can’t help but agree! The lighting bouncing off the textured scales and the smoke  just made it perfect. Even still in process, it looked spectacular in the light.

Dragon Ice carving in process by Simon O'Rourke

The Finished Piece.

Thank you to Wrexham Museums for organising and hosting the event so well (and for the mulled wine the staff not wielding chainsaws enjoyed!). Thank you too to Shaine Bailey and Treetech for sponsoring the event. And to everybody who came and watched, shared on social media, and complimented Simon on his work. It’s lovely to be able to meet people, and to have such a lovely and encouraging audience. It’s also great to finish our year as it began, with a dragon that captured the attention and hearts of the people who saw it (read about the first dragon, Y Ddraig Derw here).

And so, we leave you with the finished piece for 2019’s Ice Carving for Christmas*:

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum Christmas 2019 Finished dragon head by Simon O'Rourke

 

Dragon head in ice by Simon O'Rourke

Dragon head in ice by Simon O'Rourke

If you would like to book Simon for your event (ice or timber!) email us on [email protected] to talk about details.

*photo credit to Gareth Thomas from Wrexham Museums.

Y Ddraig Derw: An Adventure Worth Telling

Y Ddraig Derw: An Adventure Worth Telling 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

“IT SIMPLY ISN’T AN ADVENTURE WORTH TELLING IF THERE AREN’T ANY DRAGONS
A quick internet search shows nobody really knows who said this any more. Whoever it was, it still holds true that there is something about a dragon story which captures imagination. That’s even more true in Wales, where dragons have been linked with the identity of the nation since the 600AD! And it certainly seems the case with Y Ddraig Derw who has gone viral this week!

Y ddraig derw in Bethesday, North Wales

An Adventure Worth Telling

We already shared that this year has a bit of ‘dragon’ theme for us, and last week saw us working on another dragon sculpture. This time, Simon carved on location in beautiful North Wales, and it has been named ‘Y Ddraig Derw‘ (The Oak Dragon) by locals.
This dragon captured the attention and hearts of people who saw it in person and online, even before it was finished,and we’ve been overwhelmed by the positive messages, and the number of people sharing online. It even appeared in the Daily Post  and BBC!
We’re grateful and humbled, but also delighted so many of you have already been able to enjoy our Dragon of Bethesda.

The Commission

Several years ago, a 200 year old oak split, and half that fell was lying across a rock.  Sometimes in carving, we find the tree and sometimes the tree finds us! In this case it was the latter. This piece of timber was simply begging to be carved! Everything about it was perfect, from the type of tree, the length, positioning and its 30″ diameter. The commission itself came from the owner of the arboretum close to Bangor, Dr Alofs.

 Fallen oak that was to be transformed into Y ddraig derw

 

The Process

Y Ddraig Derw took six days to complete, making the most of the hours of daylight that we had. Simon completed the entire dragon on-site rather than transporting things from the workshop. This meant carrying large pieces up to the site use for the wings and legs. Definitely a good work out!
With wood that large and heavy, the process of incorporating them into the sculpture isn’t easy, but with patience and team work, we got there! The first few days focused on the head and then the shape and movement in the body, with the last two focused on texture and details. For those who would like to see more of the process, we uploaded video like this one during the week on our Facebook page.

The Finished Dragon

The finished sculpture is about 25′ long, and overlooks the road. With its craning head and open mouth, it looks like a guard dragon, roaring over those who would seek to enter its territory! Although it is on private land, there are a few public footpaths nearby for viewing, and it is visible from the southbound A5 between the first and second exits.

Simon O'Rourke pictured with Y ddraig derw in Bethesda, North Wales

Simon at work!

Visiting the Dragon

Although Y Ddraig Derw is visible from the road, it’s a tricky spot to stop for photos. We’d love for you to see him in person, but encourage you all to do it safely please! For exact location and tips for parking, please visit THIS POST on our Facebook page (it’s public, so you don’t need Facebook to see it).

Thank you once again for all the kind words and encouragement, and for sharing your photos. It’s always great to hear from you, and to see you enjoying our pieces. We’d love it if you could tag us in your posts so we can see them too! Use #simonorourke and #dragonofbethesda for this dragon.

Y ddraig derw by night.

PS: For those of you who can’t get to this dragon, why not have our dragons come to you?
Hemlock the Dragon is available for hire for shows, weddings, parties etc, and is always a big hit!

 

Photos of Y Ddraig Derw at night are taken by local photographer Derfel Owen and used with permission