sculptor

life size wood carving of a knight on a rearing horse by simon orourke.Sculpture is part of a sculpture trail in Northampton.

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail?

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail? 540 810 Simon O'Rourke

Autumn is the perfect time to get out into nature and visit one of Simon’s woodland sculpture trails. The reds and ambers of the leaves are stunning anyway, but they add a perfect touch of art and drama to his sculptures. If you need convincing, why not take a peek in our blogs about his trails at Meadow Park, Page’s Wood, or Fforest Fawr?
These are all woodland sculpture trails with a wildlife theme. But did you know there are many more applications for a sculpture trail? Read on to find out some reasons why your community, business, or charity could benefit by commissioning a sculpture trail…

 

wooden carved owl sitting on a tree stump. The Owl is from Simon O'Rourke's woodland sculpture trail in Meadow Park.

Ruby the Owl, from Simon’s Meadow Park sculpture trail

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail: Education

A sculpture trail is a great way to educate visitors about the purpose and history of your site. This is one of the reasons Simon and his wife Liz get excited about a woodland sculpture trail commission. They are passionate about nature and the environment, and about educating others. Liz is even a qualified Forest School teacher!
In the case of the woodland sculpture trails, they created characters and poetry for each sculpture which gave snippets of information about the environment and wildlife. Each trail ends with a call to action for the viewer.
Giving information in this way is more likely to engage families with young children. It also makes it more memorable for all ages, which is always a bonus!

picture shows the original sketch for a wooden bench designed by simon o'rourke for the page's wood sculpture trail

One of the original sketches and poetry for Page’s Wood Sculpture Trail

This concept of educational snippets is easily adapted to any business or local area – it’s not just for woodland! Sculptures could reflect events in the life of an individual or a town. Or they could be or based on characters from a specific book or film associated with the place or person. There’s truly no limit!
We’re living in a season where Covid regulations make it harder for people to go inside museums and other attractions to view their educational content, so an outdoor sculpture trail is a great way to bring that content outdoors.
One example of this is where Simon helped create a sculpture trail of knights in Northampton…

 

life size wood carving of a knight on a rearing horse by simon orourke.Sculpture is part of a sculpture trail in Northampton.

One of the knights Simon made as a collaboration with other artists for the Northampton Knight Trail

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail: Tourist Attraction

Another reason to consider commissioning a sculpture trail is that the trail could become a tourist attraction in and of itself. Whilst people have come to see the trail, they will then often visit the rest of the site. If they are in the area they are also likely to visit local shops, restaurants, etc, and therefore stimulate the local economy. If you are a small town with no other especially marketable points, a sculpture trail around the town could be the perfect way to draw people to the area. There is just something about the novelty of a chainsaw-carved sculpture that attracts people! They are drawn to it for selfies or post photos of the sculpture alone. As visitors post these on social media, the attraction gets free publicity. More visitors AND free publicity… sounds like a great deal!!!

Review of the decade 2014 Mungo Park

Portrait of Mungo Park – perfect to sit next to and snap a selfie!

An example of this in action would be Simon’s Dragon of Bethesda. The dragon was a private commission, but it happened to be visible from the road. People began to post photos, and it got so much attention, it made the BBC news! Local newspapers around the country picked up the story, and police even had to ask people not to slow down to get photos! This was a total accident, as it was never intended for public viewing – but it does show the power of art to draw people to a place!

wooden carved dragon with outstretched wings by simon o rourke.

The Dragon of Bethesda became an accidental tourist attraction!

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail: Covid Safe!

We already hinted at this reason to invest in a sculpture trail for your attraction. Right now many attractions are struggling to remain open, as they can’t allow the numbers into the building that are needed to remain solvent. An outdoor sculpture trail in the grounds of a venue are much safer and allow for more visitors. If budget or permanence is an issue, why not take an example from Erddig National Trust?
A few years ago, they commissioned an ‘apple trail’ for their Autumn season. Simon carved smaller apples in the style of Halloween pumpkins. Those apples were then placed around the grounds at Erddig, and visitors could follow the Erddig Apple Trail.
A trail like this can easily be turned into a family activity. Simply create maps or ‘treasure hunt sheets’, and off you go! You could even add a reward at the end as a reminder of their visit or an educational point.

a wooden apple is carved to look like a halloween pumpkin. part of the erddig apple sculpture trail by simon o rourke

One of the apples Simon created for the Erddig Apple Trail

 

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail: Double the Fundraising!

OK, so here we’re actually going to mention a few reasons to commission a sculpture trail for your venue. They have the benefit of being as permanent or temporary as you want. This means you could set up a trail for a specific season, such as an elf trail to lead a Christmas Santa Grotto. Or what about an egg or bunny trail for Easter?
But what to do with the sculptures if you don’t want to repeat the event?
What about an auction for your charity, venue, or association? In the past auctions of Simon’s work have raised anything from hundreds to thousands of pounds for charities. This means a sculpture trail has double the potential – bringing people in for the original event, and fundraising afterward!

Wooden sculpture of Queen of Hearts on her throne by Simon O Rourke. Sculpture is part of a sculpture trail in Scotland

Queen of Hearts from Simons Alice in Wonderland trail

 

Why Commission a Sculpture Trail: For Art’s Sake!

There are several other reasons we could give for a sculpture trail, but we’re going to leave it with this one: art for art’s sake! One of the many lessons we learned from lockdown is the value of the arts. People turned to music, craft, and many other hobbies that serve no utilitarian function. In the early days especially, people found respite in things of beauty around them. Photos on social media showed highlights of permitted outdoor exercise time included discovering a beautiful old building, gate, or statue in their town that they had never noticed. A sculpture trail at your venue may serve no other purpose than adding something beautiful, creative, and inspirational for people to enjoy. And that’s OK. Call us biased, but we think that is reason enough to commission a sculpture trail!

Fforest Fawr Sculpture Trail Lynx by Simon O'Rourke

Fforest Fawr Sculpture Trail Lynx

Choosing a Theme for Your Sculpture Trail

So now you’ve thought about some of the reasons to commission a sculpture trail, what theme will you choose?

The possibilities really are endless. However, some of the most popular sculptures Simon has made include fairies, wizards, and dragons. And even an Ent! These ‘fantasy’ figures will always attract people to your trail. Movies and books like the Narnia series, Harry Potter, and Lord of the Rings capture the imaginations of all generations. That makes them a great theme for a trail.

Another consideration is the historical context of a place. Chester, Bath, or York would be perfect for a trail of Roman Centurions for example. Similarly, a former monastery commissioned a series of monks that sit beautifully in the grounds.

monk by simon o rourke

One of the monks of Monksbridge

You could also think about any local people of prominence. For example, anywhere in Stratford-Upon-Avon would be a great location for some Shakespearian figures.

Finally, what festivals do you hold, and what season is it? Christmas could see an elf, reindeer, or snowman trail. Harvest is perfect for carved pumpkins.

Basically, the only limit is your imagination!

10' wooden fairy sculpture by simon o rourke

A private commission, but a fairy trail of any size could be a fun addition to any woodland space

Commission Your Sculpture Trail

Are you feeling inspired? If you would like to commission a sculpture trail, then contact us via www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/
We’re excited to hear your ideas and how we can help enhance your venues, events, communities, and attractions!

 

moving wood sculpture of a dragon by simon o'rourke

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries Through the Years

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries Through the Years 1160 770 Simon O'Rourke

Can you believe it’s already the August bank holiday weekend?! Time is definitely doing funny things! This weekend is a landmark in the Chainsaw Carving calendar, as it’s normally the English Open Chainsaw Competition. The competition is part of the Cheshire Game and Country Fair, and Simon has taken part many times over the last decade or so. Things are obviously a bit different this year, but we thought we’d mark the occasion by revisiting some of his English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries…

scene from english open chainsaw competition 2019

Where it all Began…

Simon first took part in the competition in 2004, and it was a key event in his career. It was his first competition, and he won third place. This helped prompt him to make a career from creating chainsaw-carved wood sculptures. After making that decision, he and his wife Liz set up Tree Carving in 2005… and the rest is history!

The 2004 Sculpture:

Despite being his first competition piece, the first of Simon’s English open chainsaw competition entries not only took third place but also gained national attention. At the end of the competition, artists can choose to auction off their pieces.  During that auction, Simon’s “Sleeping Girl” caught the attention of one of the Sandringham estate managers. Their bid won, and his sculpture was installed at the Queen’s Norfolk estate later that year. Not bad for a first-timer! National news networks picked up the story, which also helped as Simon began his carving career.

Unfortunately there aren’t many photos of this sculpture which proved to be such a landmark in Simon’s career. So, please forgive us the poor resolution of this photo! We promise the photos get better in the rest of the blog! If anyone is visiting the estate and gets a better photo, we would love it if you shared it and tagged us!

english open chainsaw entries by simon o'rourke: 2004 sleeping girl. A sleeping girl is carved onto a horzontal log

 

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries: 2007

Simon has had a great deal of success at the English Open. In 2007 he created this whimsical fairy sitting on a mushroom. Although Simon’s style has evolved since then, and his sculptures become much more detailed, we can already see his ability to tell a story and create life-like human form sculptures. Judges also admired this piece and he placed first!

wooden sculpture of a fairy sitting on top of a mushroom, with woods in the background. the fairy is one of simon o'rourkes english open chainsaw competition entries from 2007

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries: 2009

In 2008 and 2009 Simon also won first place with his Neptune sculpture. And once again, he demonstrated his skill at creating stunning human form sculptures.  We can already see much more of the texture that has become part of Simon’s signature style. His facial expression and details perfectly depict this wisened god of the sea, and that physique definitely reflects the power he is said to have.

 

english open chainsaw competition entries by simon o'rourke. Photo shows simon standing with a 10' sculpture of neptune carved onto a treek trunk

 

english open chainsaw competition entries by simon o'rourke. Photo shows simon standing with a 10' sculpture of neptune carved onto a treek trunk

 

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries: 2010-2013

As Simon’s awards page shows, 2010-2013 were also good years for him at the English Open. He placed in the top two each year that he entered. By now he and Liz were a definite part of the tree carving community – one of the fun aspects of taking part in events and competitions.

The nature of chainsaw carving means many pieces are often on a very large scale. Some of Simon’s largest pieces have been the Marbury Lady and the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy. His 2013 entry wasn’t as large as these, but this giant bust definitely showed he could work on a large scale!

giant wood bust of a female. one of simon o'rourke's english open chainsaw competition entries

English Open Chainsaw Entries: 2014

During some competitions, Simon is able to take the opportunity to work on a commission. He may need to refine it later but is able to complete what he can during the time allocated for the competition. 2014 was one of those times. During the competition, Simon created this sculpture of Brother Francis. How special for a client to be able to say their sculpture is award-winning! The piece ‘only’ placed third, but the client was delighted, and this monk looks amazing installed among the trees, enjoying a moment of quiet contemplation.

life size sculpture of a monk sitting against a tree. Carved by simon o'rourke as one of his english open chainsaw competition entries

 

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries: 2015

2015 was a winning year for Simon. He took first place with his incredible moving dragon sculpture. The detail is incredible with the scaly texture and attention to detail like the teeth and eyes. The movement was also a real novelty, and took Simon’s skill and creativity to the next level.

moving wood dragon sculpture

Hemlock today!

The sculpture didn’t sell at auction, but that turned out to be a good thing. Simon made some refinements to the sculpture and Hemlock was born! Hemlock has since travelled around the UK and is always a hit wherever she goes. She has helped to raise money for Clatterbridge Hospital and other causes, has taken part at ComicCon, and has even been part of a wedding! It’s true! She makes a great photo opportunity and is regularly treated to a dragon spa at the workshop (ie maintenance and repair!) to make sure she always looks her best at your events.

There is no doubt either that Hemlock played a big part in earning Simon his reputation for carving fantastic dragons. Since then he has gone on to create other incredible award-winning, viral dragon sculptures such as The Dragon of Bethesda, the egg casket from Game of Thrones, the yew dragon tower, and most recently, the fire-breathing dragon for The Dragon Tower that appeared on George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces.

To book Hemlock for your event (anyone thinking about a dragon-pulled Santa sleigh this year?!) email us using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/, and we’ll be in touch!

moving wood sculpture of a dragon by simon o'rourke

 

English Open Chainsaw Competition Entries: 2019

Moving on to 2019, and the English Open was another great year for Simon. He took part in the ‘combo’ competition. This meant creating two sculptures over the three days, one made with only a chainsaw, and the other using any power tools.

His chainsaw-only sculpture was this beautiful, intricate fairy that took second place. You can see the range of Stihl chainsaws he used in the background!

Fairy carved by Simon O'Rourke at the English open Chainsaw Competition

The ‘full power’ event meant Simon could also use his favourite Manpa angle grinder and Saburrtooth bits. He created this angel who is looking truly serene. She doesn’t look at all like she’s been surrounded by chainsaw noise and sawdust for two days!!! She shows all of Simon’s trademark movement in her clothing, and attention to detail in the face. And, as always, Simon tells a story with this sculpture and invites the viewer into this moment of serenity with her. The judges loved her too, and she took first place.

Angel carved by Simon O'Rourke at the English Open Chainsaw Carving Competition

The angel which took first place in the ‘full power’ event

 

Future Events?

Right now we don’t know when the next event or competition will take place. As you all know, the world and regulations about public events change constantly. Competitions and events are usually a big part of Simon’s summer though. They go beyond an opportunity to carve and are usually a brilliant time to connect with other artists and gain more inspiration, knowledge, and skills. We find some of them actually make for a fantastic day out too for observers, such as Huskycup or the WoodFest.  We’ve definitely missed them this year, although a change is nice too.

However! Simon does still have some space in his calendar later this year for outdoor events, such as ice carving demonstrations at Christmas, or even something ‘autumn-themed’ for your October half term event. Although the large scale events can’t happen, there are still ways to include and enjoy a live demonstration. Email us at [email protected] or use the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to ask about ideas and availability.

 

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: A side-by-side photo shows the same wooden sculpture of a stylised woman's face years apart. Photo one is warm and smooth. Photo two has taken on rich, grey hues, and the weatherted wood now has the character of a real face

Which is Better: Wood or Bronze Sculpture?

Which is Better: Wood or Bronze Sculpture? 1875 1875 Simon O'Rourke

Wood or bronze sculpture? Is the longer lasting sculpture a better sculpture? Which one should I choose? Simon is often asked “Why make a sculpture from something that will eventually degrade and return to nature?” In this blog we explore why Simon loves working with wood, and why it might be the choice for you…

Wood or ronze sculpture? Angel at the pool of bethesda by simon o'rourke at biddulph old hall. Photo shows the beautiful effect of an aging wood sculpture against the hostoric building and gardens.

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: Benefits of Bronze.

A bronze sculpture is first created in clay, wax, or other materials. That sculpture is used to create a mould, and finally, molten bronze is poured into that mould.

A bronze statue will last for thousands of years of course. We have seen this from ancient bronze sculptures still in existence today. For example, ‘Dancing Girl’ from Mohenjo-Daro is the oldest known bronze sculpture in the world, dating back 2500 years.

Wood on the other hand is a material that will eventually rot away and break down over the years…

Wood or Broze sculpture? Photo shows the bronze sculpture of dancing girl of mohenjo-daro

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: Why make something that will rot?

Environmental artists the world over operate at the opposite end of the scale. Artists like Andy Goldsworthy create artworks from nature that are gone in a short space of time. “It’s not about art,” he has explained. “It’s just about life and the need to understand that a lot of things in life do not last.

This momentary art is a powerful medium for drawing the attention to the natural world and its inherent beauty. Wood has also been used as a material for sculpture for thousands of years and also lasts well, depending on the species and how it is looked after. We shared more about which species are most enduring in our blog “Is my tree suitable for a tree carving sculpture“.

However, unlike bronze, it will always weather and begin to wear away over time.

Wood or Bronze sculpture? A close up of 'The Guardian' by Simon O'Rourke. It shows cracks in the nose of the oak lion, and the changing colours of oak sculpture.

Close up of The Guardian which shows the effects of aging on wood sculpture

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: The Beauty of Aging Wood

Weathering wood reveals much more of the character and growth patterns that form during the time the tree is growing. As an artist, Simon loves to see the process of weathering: that transformation of the freshly shaped timber to ancient-looking textures and cracks. He loves the revealing of the shapes of growth, and the natural progression of decay. For him, there is something warm about wood that captures a moment in history, the timeline of the tree, from seed to sculpture.

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: Picture shows large praying hands carved in oak by Simon O'Rourke. The wood has taken on grey hues due to weathering to give the hands character.

These praying hands have taken on more character and grey hues as the wood has aged and weatherted.

Wood or Bronze: Simon’s Philosophy as an Artist

Simon feels this compliments his artwork, and philospophy as an artist. He loves to capture a moment in time, a scene from a story, and leave the viewer feeling like they have momentarily been part of a bigger picture. The process of decay also captures an essence of the fragility of life.
Simon is very aware that his work isn’t permanent. This isn’t discouraging for thim though. Rather, he shares that:
Although some of my sculptures will eventually outlive me, their inevitable return to the earth to become part of the perpetual circle of life, is for me, a humbling experience“.

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: A side-by-side photo shows the same wooden sculpture of a stylised woman's face years apart. Photo one is warm and smooth. Photo two has taken on rich, grey hues, and the weatherted wood now has the character of a real face

Side by side photos like this show that the aging process enhances the depth and beauty of a sculpture

Bronze or Wood: An Evolving Piece of Art

As well as reflecting Simon’s philosophy as an artist, this aging process creates an ever-evolving piece of art. The photo above of a stylised woman’s face, shows that aging process actually enhances the beauty and intensity of a piece. In particular the pupil and iris are much more striking as the wood has darkened and taken on grey hues. The more varied hues and tones in the wood create something much more life-like and organic looking.

Close up of a face of a wooden sculpture showing the cracks created by weathering

Character created over time by aging and weathering of the wood.

Bronze or Wood Sculpture: Environmental Benefits

We have talked about the humbling aspect and cyclical journey of a sculpture returning to the earth. However, this is also an environmental consideration too. Simon sources his wood responsibly, and loves to transform storm-damaged and diseased trees into sculptures, giving life back to the timber. The wood will eventually return to the earth, and make no permanent footprint.

Angel at the Pool of Bethesda by Simon O'Rourke. View is from behind showing the Angel standing by a pool against the background of Old Biddulph Hall

This view from behind of Angel at the Pool of Bethesda at Biddulpho Old Hall shows how a wood sculpture perfectly compliments historic property and mature gardens

Wood or Bronze Sculpture: A Summary

Commissioning a piece of art is a big decision and an investment, and it needs to reflect your preferences and values as the buyer. All mediums have their beauty and benefits, so we would never claim one is definitively ‘better’ than another. However, if anything of the philosophical, environmental or aesthetic benefits of wood mentioned here resonate with you, it is likely a wooden sculpture is the best choice for you.

If you would like to commission a wooden sculpture, you can contact us using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ .

We’d love to hear from you!

 

Radagast the Brown by Simon O'Rourke. Radagast is on of his movie based sculptures.

Fan Art Series: Movie Based Sculptures

Fan Art Series: Movie Based Sculptures 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

This week we return to our Fan Art Series. In Part One we looked at sculptures based on literature. Then, in Part Two we shared some of Simon’s TV themed sculptures. This week, in Part Three, we are going to re-visit some of the movie based sculptures Simon has created over the years…

Movie Based Sculptures: Ent from Lord of the Rings

The first of these movie based sculptures had its own blog, but we think it’s worth sharing again. We’re talking about The Ent sculpture from Lord of the Rings. This Ent can be found in Poulton Hall on the Wirral, which is good news because it means it can be viewed by the public! The gardens are open on specific dates during the year, so if you’re in the North West why not take a look?

Movie Based Sculptures: Radagast the Brown

Again, our next sculpture has a blog of its own. You can read the full story at www.treecarving.co.uk/radagast-the-brown-blue-and-pink/, but basically, the Radagast tree sculpture came about as a way of transforming and giving life back to a diseased tree. For Lord of the Rings fans, there are endless possibilities for unique fan art. Simon is incredible at creating both fantasy and human form works of art and Lord of the Rings has plenty of both. If you’re looking for something unique either for yourself or a gift, why not a full-size sculpture or miniature piece for your garden? Create your own Hobbiton!

Radagast the Brown by Simon O'Rourke. Radagast is on of his movie based sculptures.

 

Movie Based Sculptures: Groot

Our next movie based sculpture is a character Simon has made on several occasions. Groot.

The loveable Flora Colossus was originally a Marvel creation and has featured in several popular films. Simon has created Groot sculptures for private and public commissions including this giant marionette version for Wales Comic-Con in 2015. This depiction of Groot is much more like the comic book version, or the Groot seen in Guardians of the Galaxy, 2014. It’s also an amazing likeness to the version in Marvel’s ‘Rocket and Groot’ animation from 2017.

sculptures based on movies: simon o'rourke creating a giant groot marionette for Wales Comic Con 2015

giant groot marionette tree carved sculpture by simon o'rourke

sculptures based on movies: giant groot marionette by simon o'rourke

Another version of Groot that Simon created is this sculpture. It shows a cuter, more cartoon-like Groot which is much closer to how we see him a little later.

groot by simon o'rourke, photographed in his workshop whilst in progress

Our final Groot sculpture was commissioned as a 50th birthday gift. He was hanging around the studio for one of our open days in aid of Clatterbridge Hospital. That was when this little chap got to meet him. As well as making for a cute photo, it shows the scale too – similar to an average nearly-two-year-old!

Movie based sculptures: a 3' groot carved by simon o'rourke stands next to a two year old in winter clothing to show scale

The client was kind enough to share the video with us from when she was given the Groot sculpture. Thankfully was less bemused by him than our little friend above! She shared:
Am over the moon with my 50th present off my family. As always Simon got the character spot on. Thank you so very much, he’s amazing
If you have a special birthday coming up and have a movie fan in the family, why not commission something for them?

Movie Based Sculptures: Spiderman

Continuing with the Marvel Comics theme, the next of our movie based sculptures is Spiderman. SPiderman is a little different from many of Simon’s pieces because he doesn’t just rely on shadow from cuts/texture to give him his distinctive pattern. Simon will sometimes use colouring techniques and stains or a blowtorch to create colour on a sculpture. These still allow for an organic colour and feel, so it remains in keeping with natural wood sculpture.

movie based sculptures: life sized spiderman wood sculpture created by simon o'rourke

Movie Based Sculptures: Batman

Looks like we’re on a roll here the comic book movie characters, because our next character is Batman. Good to give DC some representation too!

Batman was commissioned by Phil and Leah Jackson of Wahoo Marketing Agency (we are thankful as a business for their expertise), and helped them sell their house!
It’s true!
Batman doesn’t just fight crime, he moves real estate!
How?
Well basically, photos of the Batman sculpture went viral and drew international attention to their property.
Although it may seem excessive, in the context of the costs of renovating, improving, and staging a house for sale, a novelty sculpture can be a great investment. Not only can it help attract attention, but it may be that if the sculpture is free-standing, that you can take it with you or sell it later. A sculpture could also help tell the story of a property or area which moves the viewer in a way words don’t. So, if you are selling your property and think a sculpture may help, we’d love to hear from you!

Movie based sculptures: Batman by Simon O'Rourke

 

Movie Based Sculptures: Marilyn Monroe & More Comic Book Heroes

Our final example of movie based sculptures might be a bit of a cheat, as it’s not actually sculpture. But we’re going to go ahead and share anyway!
For people without room for a sculpture, an illustrated wall hanging may be just the solution. These are examples of some Simon has created over the years, including the original ‘blonde bombshell’, Marilyn Monroe.
Simon uses his background in illustration and combines it with his skill with an angle grinder, blow torch and, saw to create these unique illustrations. They make a striking piece of fan art, and are perfect for a gift or commemorating an occasion.
Please excuse the resolution. These were all created at events a few years ago, and cellphone camera technology wasn’t quite what it is today!

Marilyn Monroe illustration wall hanging by simon o'rourke

superhero wooden wall hanging illustrations by simon o'rourke

Commissioning Your Own Movie Based Sculpture

We hope you enjoyed this tour through some of Simon’s movie based sculptures. If you feel inspired and would like to commission a piece, we would love to hear from you. You can use the contact form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will get back to you to chat through the details.

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke. the sculpture is photographed in the entrance to ronald mcdonald house, oxford

Giving Tree Sculpture for Ronald McDonald House

Giving Tree Sculpture for Ronald McDonald House 1824 1368 Simon O'Rourke

As lockdown opens up more and more, Simon has been able to finish more projects, and install more sculptures. Sometimes it’s only once in place that the sculpture truly comes to life. It always looks so different than it did in the workshop! We think you’ll agree that this Giving Tree sculpture for Ronald McDonald House is one of them…

Giving tree sculpture for Ronald McDonald House, Oxford by Simon O'Rourke

About the Client

The Giving Tree sculpture was commissioned by Ronald McDonald House for their new house in Oxford. You can read more about the history at https://rmhc.org.uk/about/our-history/, but the goal of the charity is to build and run houses on or near hospital sites where children are treated for chronic conditions. They provide a safe space in which the families of the children in the hospital can get proper rest, away from the ward. For many families, this is the only way to be close to their child during cancer treatment.

The charity has grown a lot since the first house was built in 1974. There are now services in 64 countries! The first house in the UK was built in 1989. Since then, the charity has helped around 50,000 families – including some known to us.

Work in progress. A photo of the giving tree sculpture for Ronald McDonal house by simon O'Rourke.

Work in progress in the workshop

Where The Giving Tree Sculpture Began…

Ever since the first Ronald McDonald House opened in the UK, they have always had a “giving tree” of some description. Its purpose is to recognise donors and supporters of the Charity.  Usually, this would be a 2d piece of artwork. It was typically made out of a flat carved piece of wood, which was then mounted on a board on the wall. Plaques were then added to the leaves as people donated.
In 2016, they opened a new house to replace that first house at Guy’s. The new house was located right next to Archbishops Park in Lambeth in London and had a lovely big reception area. It seemed like a good idea to make more of the tree, and effectively bring the park into the House.  The architects researched sculptors and their work, and they felt Simon fit the bill!

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke at Ronald McDonald Evelina House

The Giving Tree at Evelina House, Simon’s first commission for Ronald McDonald House charities

A Tree for Every House!

A few months later Simon also created a similar smaller tree for their new Cardiff House. So, when it came to the new Oxford house, the charity reached out to Simon again.
Unfortunately, they had to remove a small number of trees from the site before they could start work to build the new house. This meant there was already a supply of timber for a new giving tree sculpture! And so, the charity commissioned him to remove one of those trees and change it into the new “giving tree” for the new house. So basically the tree has returned to where it started!

the 'giving tree sculpture' by Simon o'rourke. the photo shows the tree in simon's workshop while it is in progress

Work in progress in the workshop!

The Process

It would make sense to think that a tree is one of the easiest things for Simon to make. Well, it turns out that’s not quite true! There is actually quite a bit of work that goes into transforming a tree into a sculpture like this. That work is a combination of engineering, technical, and creative skill.

In this case, Simon needed to trim, remove, and replace branches so it would be a specific width and height. Meeting a specification is always important. Even more so however when the sculpture is being installed indoors. In addition, this particular sculpture was for the entrance area in the new house. This means foot traffic! Which in turn means ensuring there is enough space surrounding the tree for the foot traffic to maneuver!

branches for the giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke

Recreating a Tree Continued…

Simon also needed to ensure the tree was easy to reassemble. No Ikea flatpack nightmares here!
The photo above shows the numbered branches on the workshop floor. Numbering parts in this way is extremely important. Where memory or a photo might be sufficient to get everything back in the right spot, numbers ensure that happens as quickly as possible. A definite bonus when they are working outside in the wind and rain!

Lastly, one of the most important parts of the process we’ll mention is one of the first things Simon does on every project. Stripping the bark. It sounds like something easy, but like many things in life, getting it right is actually a little more time-consuming. Compromising at this stage can impact the final result. So, if you are considering a similar project, you might find this article about stripping bark to be helpful.

the giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke installed in ronald mcdonald oxford house

Installed in its New Home…

Simon installed the Giving Tree sculpture in the Ronald McDonald Oxford house earlier this month. Although the house hasn’t had its official opening yet, the first guests transferred from the old house at the end of April.  Staff, patients, and guests are already enjoying the sculpture. Parents have taken to it in a very positive way. Dads, in particular, seem to like the way it’s been formed, and staff from the charity have had comments around how it compliments the space it sits in.

One of the nice things about the Giving Tree sculpture is that it will continually evolve as leaves are added over time, each with the name of a donor engraved. This adds a bit more interest for regular guests as they see it change over time, and mirrors the growth and change of a living tree.

giving tree sculpture by simon o'rourke. the sculpture is photographed in the entrance to ronald mcdonald house, oxford

Speaking of Donors…

Speaking of leaves and donors! The fundraising for the Oxford house is far from finished…

The charity is still raising money to finish the house itself. Areas like the kitchen and rest areas need furnishing and equipping. They also need gardening equipment to be able to manage the grounds. Like many charities, they have found that Covid has impacted the number of donations they are receiving.

With the new house opening, the Oxford branch can support and accommodate around 2500 families a year – a massive increase on the capacity of the old house. If you would like to make a financial donation (and maybe be one of the first leaves!), visit https://rmhc.org.uk/donate/your-donation/.

Other Trees and Charities

This isn’t the first tree themed charity entrance piece Simon has created. As well as the other Giving Tree sculptures for Ronald McDonald House, Simon has created other bespoke pieces such as this sign for the Joshua Tree. Interestingly, they also work with families of children with cancer.

bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree centre by simon o'rourke

If you like the idea of having your own giving tree sculpture to honour donors to your charity, or even just a similar piece for your own home, do contact us. You can email Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to talk about details, costing etc. Charities like the two we have mentioned do such incredible work, and it’s always a privilege for Simon to be involved in helping to create a beautiful environment for the people they serve.

Thank you to staff at Ronald McDonald House Charities for information and photos used in this blog.

Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

Back in February Simon began posting photos of a Lion sculpture Ihewas working on. Last week he was able to deliver and install the finished piece. Keep reading to find out more about the Sri Lankan Lion sculpture!

a 12' sri lankan lion sculpture in oak in progress. the head is carved but the rest is stripped timber with scaffolding in the foreground

Early work on the Sri Lankan Lion

 

The Beginning….

Simon was first contacted by this client at the end of 2019. She was looking for a unique and significant gift for her husband’s retirement after 32 years working in the NHS. They had seen and admired the Dragon of Bethesda and initially reached out to ask about something similar.
Initially they talked about a lion-dragon combination. This would certainly have given lots of room for Si’s imagination!

A Sri Lankan Lion sculpture in oak by simon o'rourke against a vivid sunset. The lion holds a sword as he does on the sri lankan flag.

Progress on the Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

Evolution of an Idea

Deciding a final design is often a conversation though, and progression of ideas. This commission was no different. Early on, the client assessed their garden to see if they had any trees suitable to be carved as they stood. This is a great starting point, and it saves the step of sourcing timber. The shape, size, and unique characteristics of that tree are then the starting point for a design. In this case, there were no trees suitable though. The client realised too that they would rather have a free-standing sculpture so it could move with them if they ever moved.
We sourced a large piece of oak from JRB Tree & Timber Services, and work began!

felled oak tree wth a stihl chainsaw

The chainsaw is here to show the girth of the tree used for the Sri Lankan lion sculpture

 

15' oak on the back of a trailer ready for transportation

Ready to be brought to the workshop!

Behind the Lion…

The client had come back to Simon at this point and settled on the idea of a Sri Lankan lion sculpture. Her husband is half-Irish, half-Sri Lankan and is proud of his heritage. The flag of Sri Lanka features a lion, and he even has a tattoo of this lion on his shoulder! This gave Simon a great starting point.

The lion on the Sri Lankan flag has been around since around 500bc and was seen carrying a sword from around 160bc.  The lion represents strength and bravery, and the ethnicity of the Sinhlaese people, so Simon’s lion sculpture needed to reflect that same strength. No cute and cuddly Disney Simbas for this sculpture! That pose, the clear muscle and the pose are striking and awesome, in the true sense of the word. A definite depiction of the bravery and strength the lion represents. And carrying a sword makes it clear this is the lion of the Sri Lankan flag.
By the way, if you enjoy learning about the history and symbolism of flags, you can find out more about the symbolism in the Sri Lankan flag on this blog.

An oak sri lankan lion sculpture by artist Simon O'Rourke depicting a 'real life' version of the sri lankan lion holding a sword. The lion is in the workshop surrounded by tools and carving paraphernalia

The finished lion in the workshop

Creating the Sri Lankan Lion Sculpture

As you can see from the previous photos which show the lion in progress, Simon began with a rough outline of the lion. The first areas he started cutting detail into were the mane and face. This is important, as they were to be the focal point of the sculpture. Starting with them makes it easier to ensure the rest matches them,  rather than making the focal point fit something that is less important in terms of focus. By carving them first, Simon really can make sure that everything else about the sculpture compliments and directs the viewer’s gaze towards the ‘main feature’.

Gradually he was able to add more details, with attention being given to even the tiniest aspect of this Sri Lankan Lion sculpture. Check out his lion dentistry with the Saburrtooth coarse flame bit

A bit of careful dentistry!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Saturday, 22 February 2020

In fact, Simon used the full arsenal of power tools on this commission! Here he is using the Manpa Tools Multicutter tool with the triangle head to create the lion’s fur. For those wondering where to get their own, Manpa Tools are not easily available in the UK, but Simon sources them through www.chainsawbars.co.uk. We thoroughly recommend Chainsawbars as a company too, as you can find out in our blog  Collaboration with Chainsawbars.co.uk.

Using the Manpa tools Multicutter with the triangle cutter head to create fur texture.

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Tuesday, 11 February 2020

A Roaring Success

Seven months on from the first conversation, and Singha the Sri Lankan Lion sculpture (named after the Sinhalese people and meaning ‘Lion’) is in his new home. He looks magnificent in place. Most importantly though, the couple love him, describing him as ‘absolutely wonderful’ and ‘fabulous’.
32 years of service to the NHS is no small thing. This Sri Lankan lion sculpture is a wonderful gift to recognise that service and honour their heritage.

Sri Lankan Lion sculpture by simon o'rourke standing in a paved area of a private garden

 

12' oak sri lankan lion sculpture by simon o'rourke pictured with the clients in a paved area

The client and her husband with Singha the lion

A Unique Gift

If you are looking for your own unique, significant, and personal gift, we would love to hear from you. Contact us via the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will get back to you to chat about design and costs.

 

Memorial sculpture for Robyn by Simon O'Rourke

A Memorial Sculpture for Robyn

A Memorial Sculpture for Robyn 1824 1368 Simon O'Rourke

In our blogs,  the perfect portrait sculpture for you part one and part two, we mentioned commissioning a portrait as a memorial. This week we would like to share a memorial portrait Simon recently created. In fact, it was Simon’s first piece after lockdown began to lift. Thank you to the family for allowing us to write about this memorial aculpture for Robyn.

A memorial sculpture for Robyn carved by Simon O'Rourke depicting a young girl as a fairy with a robin on her open hand

The Commission

Several years ago, Simon received a commission to create a sculpture for a local High School, in memorial of a young student who had tragically passed away. The family were touched by the way the sculpture captured their daughter’s character, even though Simon had never met her. More specifically, they were moved by the way Simon’s portrayal of Robyn captured her loving and caring nature. A

Memorial sculpture for Robyn, carved in oak, depicting a young girl reading a book

Simon’s original memorial for Robyn

Any death of a young person is difficult. However, for this family, there were also questions that took several years to settle. Thankfully they were recently able to find closure and resolution.
To mark the ending of this horrendous time in their lives they wanted to celebrate Robyn’s life. They also wanted to do something that would help eradicate the legal battle which had prevented them from being able to grieve their beautiful daughter. And so, when they moved house, they created a garden that would honour and remember her. Remembering the original memorial scultpure for Robyn that Simon had created, they commissioned a portrait for their garden.

 

memorial sculpture for robyn by simon o'rourke in process. picture depicts a metal stool with a very basic outline carved in oak of a young girl sitting, woth a robin on her outstretched hand

The memorial sculpture for Robyn underway in Simon’s garden

Creating the Memorial Sculpture for Robyn

Although the commission was small in scale compared to many Simon has undertaken (have you seen the Giant Hand of Vrynwy or the Marbury Lady?!), in some ways, it was a big undertaking.
Ensuring a memorial sculpture captures and reflects the person is SO important as it is often a key part of the grieving process, and impacts the way the person will be remembered. Simon understands this, and takes time to ‘get to know’ the person through photos and conversation. He is then able to create a memorial sculpture that is truly honouring to the person.

In the case of Robyn, she was a caring, and loving young lady. The many cards the family received after losing her showed them how respected and valued she was for being a good friend. This sculpture shows Robyn at peace, and serene. It also reflects that caring and gentle nature through her body language and relationship with the robin on her hand.

close up of the face of the oak memoral sculpture for robyn by simon o'rourke. a young girls face is shown in an oak carving with a serene expression

Working from Home

Simon didn’t just face creative challenges with this sculpture. There was also the very real practical challenge of …… LOCKDOWN!

Health and safety of all the team is important to Simon and Liz. So, like many of the population, Simon had to work from home! Also like many of the population, that meant learning to deal with new interruptions (like the dog moving the video camera) and new distractions (a beautiful garden to tend) In case you didn’t catch them on our Facebook page, here are some of the videos of the memorial sculpture for Robyn in progress….

Back on the chainsaw after 8 weeks! It's been good for me to have a break though …

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Wednesday, 20 May 2020

What a scorcher!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Wednesday, 20 May 2020

The Finished Sculpture

As you can see in the videos, Simon used his Stihl cordless chainsaws for the bulk of the carving. He then used Saburrtooth bits to add details and texture. The memorial sculpture for Robyn is oak, which means it is sturdy and stands up well to the chainsaws! It also means it is durable, and will withstand wind and rain – essential for an outdoor sculpture. Oak tends to pull out more brown hues than blacks or greys. This means as the sculpture ages, it will both deepen in colour and become much ‘warmer’ in tone.  This video shows the finished piece from several different angles.

 

Here's a little video to show a different angle!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Friday, 22 May 2020

Testimonial

Simon received a lot of lovely feedback on social media when he originally shared the picture of the memorial for Robyn. Thank you to those who commented! The most important thing though is that the client is happy…..

I do need to thank you for undertaking the carving. As soon as I saw it I was so moved. It is beautful and I thank you for creating a carving in remembrance of Robyn

It is ALWAYS humbling to receive such lovely comments. Even more so when the piece marks the ending of something as challenging as these clients have walked through. Being a part of the healing journey for clients is truly an honour. We think Robyn looks beautiful in the garden created in her memory, and we hope this sculpture will bring the family joy for years and years to come.

Photo provided by client and used with permission.

Commissioning Your Own Memorial Sculpture

If you would like to commission a sculpture in memorial of a loved one, Simon would love to hear from you. Visit us on http://www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to connect.

Perfect Portrait for You: Part Two

Perfect Portrait for You: Part Two 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

If you regularly read our blog, you’ll know that last week we began writing about the perfect portrait scultpure for you. We feel people sometimes shy away from commissioning a portrait. That can be for lots of different reasons. However, we also know that portraiture is extremely varied. Simon is also able to sculpt in many different styles and scales. This means there is ALWAYS a perfect portrait for you!

Last week we looked at some of Simon’s classic full length sculptures, and a classic bust. There is no doubt that every time Simon creates a new full full size portrait, it has impact. However, they may not be the perfect portrait for YOU. Space, budget, style preferences and more mean the perfect portrait for you might be something a little different….

Chainsaw carving artist Simon O'Rourke standing with his life size sculptures of soccer players kenny dalglish and Bill Shankley

 

The Bobble Head!

If a classic sculpture isn’t quite your thing, and you want something more ‘relaxed’, what about a bobble head?

Typically bobble heads are a figurine with a disproportionately large head mounted on a spring. This allows it to bob up and down – hence the name! They are often made as a caricature of a famous person. You can find out more in this article about the history of the bobble head as a portrait.


The perfect portrait for you, your space and your preferences might be something fun like this bobblehead sculpture of Gary Barlow. In the photo simon o'rourke is pictured with three shots of a full size sculpture of gary barlow with a disproportionately large head!

A bobble head portrait can be created in any size to suit your space. Simon can create a flattering representation, or more of a caricature or the person. They definitely bring some fun to the idea of a portrait! If a bobbing head causes you concern, don’t worry. Simon can still carve in this style with a fixed head that stays firmly in place!

perfect portrait for you might be a bobble head like this life size carving of chainsaw artist steve backus depicted with an oversized head and carrying chainsaw carving equipment

A bobble head of fellow chainsaw artist Steve Backus

The Collage/Group Portrait

Maybe you’re looking for something unique instead of a family photo. Or something to commemorate a team. n which case, the perfect portrait for you may be some kind of collage.

A collage can be created in an endless number of ways, depending on the number of subjects and how you want to pose them. Again, they are something a little different to a classic portrait. The presenters from BBC’s Country File certainly loved the sculptures Simon created for them a few years ago!

 

a perfect portrait for you and your family might be a collage. this photo is of a sculpture of multiple faces in one piece of wood.

Stylised/Modern

Are you more of a modernist when it comes to sculpture? Perhaps something more stylised would suit you. These faces were exhibition pieces Simon created at a couple of different events in 2019. You can read about their story in our Face to Face blog.
Even though they appear simple, in-person, they are incredibly striking!
Although these are not direct likenesses, they are great examples of Simon’s versatility as a portrait artist.

The ‘Cheeky Nod’

The perfect portrait for you may not actually be an actual portrait! Rather, it may be that you incorporate the features or likeness of someone into something else. Kind of a cheeky nod to the person rather than a formal depiction.

One example of that is Simon’s dragon for St George’s hospital garden. Mark Owen (former Take that singer) was the special guest who would be opening the garden. So, when Simon carved the dragon, he chose to use Mark Owen’s features in the dragon. It’s subtle, but there is definitely a fun likeness!

When might this ‘cheeky nod’ be appropriate? Maybe your club or society is commisioning  a sculpture to commemorate an event or occasion. The sculpture itself can’t be of the individual, but using the features of a specific key person on a character or object can be a fun way of acknowledging them and their involvement.

Singer Mark Owen photographed next to chainsaw carver simon o'rourke

A chainsaw carved dragon by simon o'rourke in cartoon style. The dragon's face has been carved to incorporate the features of singer Mark Owen so it bears a resemblance to him

If that’s a bit TOO subtle for you, what about using the faces of specific people on other objects? More of a ‘hybrid’ or combination than just a ‘cheeky nod’ to the person.

One client did just that. She wanted traditional ornaments for her garden, like pixies, fairies and gnomes. However, as a loving grandmother, she also wanted to depict her grandchildren. That led to the unique commission below. Simon carved these cute miniature pixies appropriately sized for her garden. Rather than imagining a character and featurs for each though, the face of each sculpture was one of the client’s granchildren!

Three traditional pixies carved in miniature on a small tree stump.

The Wall Hanging

Finally, maybe space doesn’t allow for you to have a 3D sculpture. Maybe it just isn’t your thing. In which case, these illustrated wall hangings could be the perfect portrait commission for you.

If you have read his biography, you’ll know Simon trained in illustration. He initially had aspirations to be an illustrate children’s books, and stumbled into tree carving! An alternative to a sculpture is a portrait in wood. Like all Simon’s portraits (except a bust!), wall hangings can be for individiual or group portraits. They can be created in a wood to suit your room, and make a great gift or commemorative piece.

prefect portrait for you series featuring a pyrography portrait of marilyn monroe by simon o'rourke

 

The faces of the four beatles created by simon o'rourke through burning and etching a wood panel

We hope you have enjoyed exploring some of Simon’s portrait work. We also hope you feel inspired, and know that there really is a perfect portrait for you, no matter your preference, budget, space, or occasion!

If you would like to explore commissioning a portrait, contact Simon at http://www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/

We’d love to hear from you!

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Last night Simon was on ‘home territory’ as he took part in the annual Victorian Christmas market in Wrexham. Don’t worry though, he hasn’t traded his chainsaw for a stall and money pouch! Simon’s contribution to the evening was much cooler, if we do say so ourselves. He swapped timber for something much wetter, and did some ice carving for Wrexham Museum.

Crowds watching ice carving for Wrexham Museum

Outside Wrexham Museum*

About the Victorian Market

Wrexham’s Christmas Market has become one of the most eagerly awaited events in the town’s calendar and successfully attracts thousands of shoppers year after year.  This year there was a Victorian theme to the market with Punch and Judy shows throughout the day, and period street performers. The main feature though was 100 stalls from Queens Square right up to and inside St Giles’ Church.

Punch and Judy show at Wrexham Victorian Christmas Market

Punch & Judy on Hope Street

About Ice Carving for Christmas

To coincide with the event, Wrexham Museums also organised and hosted an event: Ice Carving for Christmas. As well as Simon’s ice carving, the museum was open for the public and people could do Christmas shopping in the gift shop and enjoy a hot chocolate or mulled wine in the cafe. Various school choirs performed, including Bryn Hafod Primary who sang in both Welsh and English, and Libby and Sign of the Times. As you can see from the first photo we shared, plenty of people came to enjoy the evening.

Crowds watching Simon O'Rourke Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

Crowds watching Simon Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum*

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum

If you read the blog we wrote a couple of weeks ago about the event (visit it here) then you’ll know Simon didn’t just complete one carving. The Ice carving for Wrexham Museum was actually a trail through the town. It began at St Giles church, where most of the market stalls were located, and ended at the Museum.

In the first location, Simon began by carving one block of ice, which was a clue as to what the final ice sculpture would be. People could then follow him to second location where he carved a second block, giving people a second clue.

They could then follow him to the museum where they could submit their guesses as to what his final carving would be, and any correct answers won a prize.

*spoiler alert*

For those who know that 2019 was a year full of dragons for us, it will come as no surprise that the final sculpture was this stunning dragon head.

It lives!! The dragon head, complete with smoke!!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Thursday, 5 December 2019

Let us take you back though through the evening as the audience experienced it though…..

Setting up:

Working in the multiple areas gave Simon and Paul the first challenge of the night – getting all the equipment through the thousands of people attending the Victorian Market! They had everything loaded up on a cart, and the high vis jackets definitely helped them get noticed so the crowds could part a little. It definitely wasn’t the quickest or easiest transportation of equipment though!

Paul and Simon making their way through the crowds attending the market!

Simon O'Rourke safety jacket

Paul and Simon making their way through the crowds attending the market!

St Giles Location

The first location was St Giles church where Simon carved this stunning dragon’s eye. Standing it the crowd, it was fun to be able to hear people’s awe as they watched. Especially as the chain saw went all the way through the ice to carve the space that became the eye! Several people were also commenting on how clear the ice was. Many guessed correctly that we didn’t just freeze water from our hosepipe to make the blocks. Rather, they are especially made for events like this. There’s a science behind it, but you can actually do it at home! Read all about how crystal clear ice is made at Barschool.Net. We’re happiest to leave it to the professionals, but if you try it yourselves, let us know if it works!

As we have said before, it is the lighting that makes the difference when ice carving. This green lighting reflecting off the scales Simon created is definitely eerie and mysterious, which helped add to the sense of mystery and anticipation of what the final carving would be.

Viewers outside St Giles*

Early on in the work on the dragon’s eye

Simon O'Rourke working on an ice carving of a dragon's eye, Wrexham 2019

Adding textured to create the scales*

Dragon eye at Ice Carving for Wrexham by Simon O'Rourke

The finished dragon’s eye*

Henblas Square

The second location of the night was Henblas Square.
Here, as well as the general admiration of what Simon was doing, I could hear many more questions about the equipment.

“His hands must be freezing” was also a pretty common theme!

Unlike most people were thinking, Simon wasn’t using specialist ‘ice carving’ equipment. He used his faithful Stihl battery powered chainsaws (complete with the handy backpack you will have noticed for the battery packs) for most of the initial carving. This meant they were lightweight and didn’t need a power supply. Perfect for this kind of mobile evening. He also used his Manpa tools angle grinder, with burr bits by Saburrtooth. And, while we’re speaking of Saburrtooth, we’re excited to announce Simon will become one of their ambassadors in 2019!

It was nice to see so many people stay and watch the entire carve here. For a long time people were guessing it was going to be eagles, rather than (as you can see) this amazing dragon claw (clue number two)! It really is fascinating to watch, but the audience were also encouraged to stay by the unusually warm evening. After several nights of hard frost, it was 10°c! Although being a warmer night was helpful for the audience and shoppers, the warmer weather meant Simon had to carve extra fast as the ice was melting far more quickly that he’d hoped!

Simon O'Rourke ice carving: dragon claw

Simon o Rourke Ice Carving for Wrexham Museums 2019 Dragon Claw

The finished dragon claw, clue number two in the ice carving trail

The finished dragon claw, clue number two in the ice carving trail*

Wrexham Museum

The museum location was the longest of Simon’s carves, and he used six blocks of ice rather than the one that he used at the other locations. Even before he arrived, people were fascinated by the ice on the museum forecourt.

ice blocks for carving wrexham museum 2019

Blocks of ice waiting for carving!

Simon was challenged here not only by the ice melting in the warmer weather, but also an impressive wind. At one point the leaves spiraling in the air looked like a scene from The Wizard of Oz! It didn’t put people off watching though, and in some cases it was hard for parents to pry their children away.

Ice Carving for Wrexham museum 2019

Watching outside Wrexham Museum*

Simon o'Rourke ice carving dragon Wrexham 2019

Adding texture with an angle grinder

Simon O'Rourke adding detail to an ice carving dragon, Wrexham 2019

Adding detail to the dragon

One of the perks of Simon being on ‘home turf’ is being able to watch him. Another is being able to hear and see other people’s reactions. The audiences at all the locations were a mix of people who have followed Simon and his work for years, and others who had never even imagined creating something with a chainsaw!

“The precision is unbelievable”

“I’m so impressed with the talent and detail he is able to produce with a chainsaw”

“I’ve never seen anything like it before. It’s bold and beautiful”

“I was only going to stay ten minutes but once I started watching, I had to stay until the end”

“The detail is unbelievable”

“Stunning. Simply stunning”

We can’t help but agree! The lighting bouncing off the textured scales and the smoke  just made it perfect. Even still in process, it looked spectacular in the light.

Dragon Ice carving in process by Simon O'Rourke

The Finished Piece.

Thank you to Wrexham Museums for organising and hosting the event so well (and for the mulled wine the staff not wielding chainsaws enjoyed!). Thank you too to Shaine Bailey and Treetech for sponsoring the event. And to everybody who came and watched, shared on social media, and complimented Simon on his work. It’s lovely to be able to meet people, and to have such a lovely and encouraging audience. It’s also great to finish our year as it began, with a dragon that captured the attention and hearts of the people who saw it (read about the first dragon, Y Ddraig Derw here).

And so, we leave you with the finished piece for 2019’s Ice Carving for Christmas*:

Ice Carving for Wrexham Museum Christmas 2019 Finished dragon head by Simon O'Rourke

 

Dragon head in ice by Simon O'Rourke

Dragon head in ice by Simon O'Rourke

If you would like to book Simon for your event (ice or timber!) email us on [email protected] to talk about details.

*photo credit to Gareth Thomas from Wrexham Museums.