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the prestatyn walker sculptures with bushes in the background

How The Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Could Help Rejuvenate a Town

How The Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Could Help Rejuvenate a Town 600 600 Simon O'Rourke

We’ve blogged before about the power of a sculpture to increase tourism and revenue. Friends of Prestatyn Railway Station had the same thought when they commissioned the Prestatyn Walker sculpture. This week’s blog shares the story behind that sculpture…

 

Prestatyn Walker sculpture photographed at Simon O'Rourke's workshop. The sculpture is a male hiker leaning on a signpost. In the background there are fields.

Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Story: Walkers Are Welcome

Prestatyn was the first town in Wales to be awarded ‘Walkers are Welcome‘ status. Two of Wales’ most significant routes (the Offa’s Dyke trail and the Welsh coastal path) pass through the coastal town,and locals have worked to create a welcoming town with attractions and amenities. However, in a survey, around 1/3 of people were unaware of this. Locals saw the need to change this, especially as the beach brings trade to the town for a short season in the year, but walking had the potential to generate year-round income…

 

the prestatyn walker sculpture on the disused platform at Prestatyn Station. A railway bridge is visible in the background.

Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Story: Prestatyn Railway Station

Around 22 million passengers a year travel through Prestatyn Station, so Friends of Prestatyn Railway Sation felt they had a role to play in attracting more walkers to the town. And so they set to work! The group began to improve the appearance of the station to make it more appealing to visitors. As their ideas grew, they decided to commission a piece of artwork to install on a disused platform. Their goal was to tell a story and help convey the message that the town is associated with walking – thus attracting more visitors.

 

the prestatyn walker sculptures with bushes in the background

Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Story: Commissioning the Sculpture

The story is much longer than we can share in this blog. However, fast-forwarding through all the work and research, the group came to a point of inviting proposals from three artists for the sculpture. Simon’s proposal was a lovely tie-in with the message that walkers are welcome. The clothing made it immediately obvious that the sculpture was a ‘walker’/hiker. It was large enough to be seen from a passing train, the wood sculpture fits the aesthetic, and it immediately told the story the group wanted.

 

a group of people in orange safety vests srround a sculpture of a walker on a railway platform

 

Prestatyn Walker Sculpture Story: From Commission to Installation

The group faced a few hurdles with this project. If you’re thinking of commissioning something for a public area, it’s worth being aware that you can sometimes need to apply for permission. However, they gained sponsorship to cover the cost and persevered with the red tape. And this week, Simon and a team installed the sculpture on the disused platform! (If you have five minutes, the video is below)

Thankfully, in all the challenges they faced working with Simon wasn’t one of them! Sherry Walker can attest that he was ‘excellent to work with’ and that they are delighted with the sculpture.
They now hope the council will extend the walkway to the side of the platform. This means in future, passers-by will see the sculpture with walkers in the background and people will immediately know that indeed walkers are welcome! And hopefully, it will, in turn, encourage more walking tourism to the town.

 

Your Own Story-Telling Sculpture

Has this inspired you to think about how a sculpture could help attract visitors to your town or attraction? If so, contact Simon at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to start a conversation. Even if you’re not 100% certain of what it might be, Simon often has excellent, creative ideas and would love to be a part of rejuvenating your community!

Two life size sculptures of women carved from oak, standing on a balcony at Prestatyn Hillside Shelter. They are two of Simon O'Rourke's public tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend

Eight Tree Carving Sculptures to See this Bank Holiday Weekend

Eight Tree Carving Sculptures to See this Bank Holiday Weekend 1024 600 Simon O'Rourke

It’s bank holiday weekend which means an extra day for relaxing. With reasonable weather predicted, why not get out and enjoy some of our British outdoors or attractions? And if you wanted to take in some public art while you’re out, here are eight of Simon’s tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend…

the giant hand of vrynwy by simon o'rourke. Photograph is taken at night and shows an illuminated 50ft hand sculpture surrounded by woodland

The Giant Hand of Vrynwy by night by Gareth Williamson

One: Giant Hand of Vyrnwy

The first of our sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend is the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy. The hand has taken the social media world by storm, and it’s even more impressive in real life. Standing at 50ft tall and surrounded by trails through the stunning Welsh countryside, you won’t be disappointed by your visit. Plan your trip at www.lake-vyrnwy.com.

giant hand of vyrnwy. one of simon o'rourke's public sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend

Two: Dragon of Bethesda

Technically, the Dragon of Bethesda is on private land. However, it’s viewable from public areas – but please don’t block the driveway next to the layby when you park! If you’re travelling through Snowdonia, it’s worth a look for sure. Find the dragon at 53°11’40.6″N 4°04’42.4″W or https://maps.google.com/?q=53.194613,-4.078445.

Simon O'Rourke's dragon of bethesda, one of his public tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend

Three: Prestatyn Hillside Shelter Walkers

You get two in one for our third suggestion of tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend! The sculptures are installed at the Prestatyn Hillside shelter and represent the era the shelter was built, and the Offa’s Dyke National trail. And the view is simply incredible! Definitely worth the walk up the hill. All the links you need to plan a visit (map, public transport, parking etc) are at www.haveagrandtour.co.uk/take-five-for-a-view-across-prestatyn.

Two life size sculptures of women carved from oak, standing on a balcony at Prestatyn Hillside Shelter. They are two of Simon O'Rourke's public tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend

Number Four: Maes Y Pant Boy Sculpture

Maes y Pant is a lovely woodland close to Wrexham, ideal for a walk and with the bonus that dogs are welcome! Simon and his team actually have a few pieces there, including the Maes Y Pant fort and Gwyddion the Wizard. However, we feel the highlight is the young boy planting a tree. Plan your visit at www.maes-y-pant.com.

Trees for Kids 'Boy Planting Sapling' sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

Number Five: The Shakespeare Seat at Poulton Hall

This Shakespeare Seat is one of Simon’s most recent pieces. As well as this piece, Poulton Hall is also home to his Ent and Gollum sculptures as well as several pieces by other artists. Although the gardens are only open on select weekends, this weekend happens one of them! Book your visit at www.poultonhall.co.uk/GardenOpenings.html.

A client sits on on the bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall. It appears as if she is in conversation with a life size sculpture of William Shakespeare by Simon O'Rourke

Simon positioned Shakespeare to sit as if in conversation with anyone who sits with him

Number Six: The Highclere Airman

The sixth of Simon’s tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend is the Airman sculpture at Highclere Castle. Something for Downton Abbey, history and architecture fans all in one place! Plan your visit and book your tickets at www.highclerecastle.co.uk.

Highclere Castle Airman by Simon O'Rourke

Number Seven: Marbury Lady Sculpture

The Marbury Lady is our seventh suggestion of tree carving sculptures to see this bank holiday weekend. She cuts an impressive (and ghostly!) figure at Marbury Country Park in Northwich. The park is free although the pool does have an admission fee. And it’s another one that allows dogs! Find out more about the various trails and plan your visit at www.visitcheshire.com/things-to-do/marbury-country-park-and-outdoor-pool-p32091.

Number Eight: Woodland Sculpture Trails

If one sculpture leaves you wanting to see more, our final suggestion for tree carving sculptures to see this weekend is just what you want! Simon has created sculpture trails at Page’s Wood, Meadow Park and Fforest Fawr. Each of the trails features multiple sculptures based on local wildlife, tells a story and encourages conservation.

Click on the links below to plan your visit to each:
Page’s Wood Woodland Sculpture Trail
Meadow Park Woodland Sculpture Trail
Fforest Fawr Woodland Sculpture Trail

woodland sculpture trails by simon o'rourke. Photo shows a howling wolf in redwood, surrounded by trees. Located in Fforest Fawr.

This wolf forms part of the Fforest Fawr trail.

Share Your Experience!

Whatever you do this weekend, we hope you have fun, feel refreshed and stay safe. And if you do visit one of Simon’s sculptures, please share your experience! Tag Simon in your photos on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter and tell us what you thought. It’s always great to hear from you!

And if you feel inspired and want your own sculpture, contact Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact.

 

Simon O'Rourke's Lews Castle Carriage Driver sitting in the antique cart at Lews Castle

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture 450 600 Simon O'Rourke

This week Simon’s carriage driver sculpture arrived in its new home up in the Outer Hebrides. The commission is part of an upgrade/renovation to Lews Castle; a Victorian castle located in the town of Stornaway. The project has several components and is a lovely example of the community uniting to rejuvenate and improve the aesthetics of the town. Thank you to Janet Paterson for sharing some of the story for this week’s blog…

 

Simon O'Rourke's Lews Castle Carriage driver sculpture photographed in his workshop. The sculpture is a lifesize cedar sculpture of a bearded man posed as if driving a pony carriage

The carriage driver sculpture in Simon’s workshop

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture: Background to the Commission

During lockdown, the Western Isles Lottery Team undertook a project to upgrade ‘Miss Porter’, a horse sculpture that has been one of the town’s attractions since 1994. She could be found – along with a carriage – at the Lews Castle Porter’s Lodge, and was in need of some TLC. Sadly it turned out the original carriage was beyond repair. So, as well as restoring the horse sculpture, the team sourced an amazing replacement that dates back to 1898. Once the restoration was completed and installed, the team loved the result but felt the carriage was missing a driver. A local sculptor followed Simon on social media, and through that connection, the team reached out to commission a driver.

 

Miss Porter, the horse sculpture at Lews Castle, before the 2020 restoration. The horse is in need of paint work and repair.

Miss Porter with members of the Stornaway Amenity Trust before her restoration

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture: Creating the Sculpture

Simon sourced a suitable piece of oak for the sculpture so it would be hard-wearing and durable. It was easier and more cost-effective for Simon to create the sculpture in his workshop and ship the finished piece. This meant getting plenty of photos and measurements from the team to ensure the driver would not only look good but would also fit well in the carriage.
We’ve mentioned in this blog Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture that Simon will sometimes need photos and details in advance. That can sound a bit overwhelming, but don’t worry. This client can testify that working with Simon was “simple and straightforward”, that the sculpture is “beautifully crafted to complement the period carriage”, and fits EXACTLY!

Simon O'Rourke's Lews Castle Carriage Driver sitting in the antique cart at Lews Castle

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture: Power of Community

This successful restoration/upgrade is a great example of how communities can come together to bring art to their locale. The Western Isles Lifestyle Lottery was created to raise funds for the regeneration of its many communities. They have now raised approx £240,000 for projects the length and breadth of the Western Isles. Amazing! The carriage driver is just one of many, many projects they have invested in. These projects not only make improvements for residents but have helped bring tourism and revenue to the area.
As well as the lottery funding, the team worked closely with local trusts and businesses to complete the upgrade.
If you have a similar project in mind for your locality, we definitely recommend utilising the power of community, as the team in Stornoway did. There are also some ideas for fundraising in our blog How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture.

 

lews castle carriage driver sculpture by simon o'rourke. sculpture is seated in an antique pony cart being drawn by a wooden sculpture of a horse

The finished horse, carriage and driver installed by the Porter’s Lodge in Stornoway

Lews Castle Carriage Driver Sculpture: Name the Driver

The finished sculpture has delighted the team. Simon captured exactly what they were looking for in the pose, clothes and character of the sculpture, and the whole project has been described as “a beautiful showpiece” by the lottery team’s secretary. And, in another act of community, they are holding a competition to allow local residents to name the drive. His face is definitely full of character, so he definitely can’t remain nameless! What would you name him? Leave us a comment with your suggestion!

Close up of the face of simon o'rourke's cedar carriage driver sculpture

A face with this character needs a name!

We hope you feel inspired by the story behind this sculpture and the way a community can come together to rejuvenate an area. As always, if you have an idea for a sculpture, contact Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/. 
We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

close up of the face of Simon O'Rourkes bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall

Bespoke Shakespeare Seat at Poulton Hall

Bespoke Shakespeare Seat at Poulton Hall 800 600 Simon O'Rourke

405 years ago today the world lost a literary legend, 52 years to the day that is is often recognised as being born. Who are we talking about? Britain’s very own bard, William Shakespeare.
To fit the occasion, this week’s blog is the story behind Simon’s bespoke Shakespeare seat at Poulton Hall…

close up of the face of Simon O'Rourkes bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall

Bespoke Shakespeare Seat: The Commission

This bespoke Shakespeare seat is installed at Poulton Hall, Bebington. It joins two of Simon’s other sculptures; the Monkey Puzzle Ent and Gollum. If you read either of the blogs about those sculptures, you will remember that the whole estate features literary-themed art.
Poulton Hall is the ancestral home of the Lancelyn Green family. The father of the present incumbent was Roger Lancelyn Green, the author of many well-known books about Robin Hood, King Arthur, Greek Heroes, Ancient Egypt, Norse Myths, Dragons, and all things imaginative and creative.  As one of the Oxford Inklings, Roger was also friends with J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, who was an occasional visitor to Poulton. As a result, many aspects of the grounds have been inspired by imaginative literature.
Although Shakespeare is a departure from this fantasy literature genre, there is no doubt he fits right in among such a rich literary legacy.

Bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall in procee. artist simon o'rourke has outlined Shakespeare in the wood sitting. It is clear it is a person but only his top half has any details.

Work in progress on the bespoke Shakespeare seat at Poulton Hall

Bespoke Shakespeare Seat: The Design

The Shakespeare seat has been designed as both a beautiful portrait and a seat for visitors. When Simon takes on a commission like this, he is careful to ensure the seating is functional. He also gives his usual attention to the details in the sculpture to create a stunning feature for any private garden or public attraction. In this case, he has chosen to depict Shakespeare sitting on the bench. He has tilted the head to make it look as if Shakespeare has paused his writing to share a conversation with whoever sits with him. That twinkle in Shakespeare’s eye (seen in the first picture) makes it seem that the conversation was humorous!

A client sits on on the bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall. It appears as if she is in conversation with a life size sculpture of William Shakespeare by Simon O'Rourke

Simon positioned Shakespeare to sit as if in conversation with anyone who sits with him

Bespoke Shakespeare Seat: More Details

Shakespeare’s position and expression weren’t the only details that Simon thought out carefully. He researched clothing of the period to ensure the clothes and hair accurately showed the fashion of the day. He also discovered a historic disagreement too. It seems people can’t agree as to whether Shakespeare was left or right-handed! As you can see, Simon and the client settled on showing him writing with his right hand.
Although that may not seem important, for clients it matters that the portrait is an accurate reflection of the person.

Another lovely touch is the stack of books for seat legs. Rather than pick titles himself, he wanted the seat to fully reflect the passion and preferences of the client.

As with the decision about Shakespeare’s dominant hand, it may seem a little strange to dedicate so much time to tiny details. However, touches like this are what can really make a work stand out.
It also matters that the client is happy with Simon’s work, so any time there is a detail that is uncertain, Simon will work closely with the client who will make the final decision.

seat of a bench carved to look like a stack of books bearing titles of shakespeare plays. It is the leg of the bespoke shakespeare seat at poulton hall by simon o'rourke

The book titles were chosen by the client to reflect her passions and preferences.

 

Viewing the Bespoke Shakespeare Seat at Poulton Hall

People often ask if they can view Simon’s work. The good news is that it IS possible to see the bespoke Shakespeare seat and Simon’s other Poulton Hall sculptures! The estate opens on certain days of the year, usually in aid of charity. Both the home and gardens are stunning and worth a visit. In fact, novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne enjoyed them so much he even commented on “the fine lawns and the view of the Welsh hills out across the ha-ha or sunken fence”. They are also available to book for weddings. A perfect venue for any literature lovers! You can check the dates at http://www.poultonhall.co.uk/GardenOpenings.html if you are interested in paying a visit.

bench and sculpture of william shakespeare carved by artist simon o'rourke

The finished bespoke Shakespeare seat at Poulton Hall

 

Final Thoughts on the Bespoke Shakespeare Seat

This was one of Simon’s first jobs coming out of this year’s lockdown. It was a great one to start with though as he enjoyed carving it, and the client is delighted with the finished piece. It got us thinking though… if you were to sit and have a conversation with Shakespeare, what would you talk about?

As always, if you are interested in commissioning a sculpture like this for your own home or attraction, contact Simon via the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Cheshire Life Magazine cover featuring The Marbury Lady sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

The Marbury Lady Revisited

The Marbury Lady Revisited 419 600 Simon O'Rourke

This month Cheshire Life magazine featured The Marbury Lady on its front cover. It was part of a feature on local photographer Alison Hamlin Hughes – AKA The (other!) Marbury Lady! Although the article wasn’t about Simon, many people have been interested in the sculpture. So, we thought we’d revisit the story behind the sculpture in this week’s blog…

 

Cheshire Life Magazine cover featuring The Marbury Lady sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

The March/April edition of Cheshire Life featuring Simon’s Marbury Lady sculpture

 

Marbury Lady Revisited: The Location

The Marbury Lady is found in Marbury Park, Northwich. Many of the features of the park date back to the days when it was a grand estate. Since then however, it has served many purposes including country club, Prisoner of War camp, and hostel. Nowadays it is an integral part of  Mersey Forest with a range of paths and trails.

 

Marbury Lady Sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

Marbury Lady Revisited: The Commission

The Marbury Lady sculpture had its roots (no pun intended) in the sad demise of an avenue of elms. A burst brine pipe had cause saline poisoning and many of the trees had died. The Friends of Anderton and Marbury who run the park decided to turn one of the stumps into a sculpture. An that’s where Simon comes in!

For those wondering about saline poisoning though, sadly it is very common in the UK. When a tree is exposed to too much salt, it blocks the flow of essential nutrients. In turn, the tree can no longer make chlorophyll. If like us, your high school science is a bit of a blur, that’s the green stuff plants use to turn sunlight into usable energy! A tree can be exposed to salt in many ways, including splashes from gritted/salted roads in winter.

Thankfully when spotted early enough, it can be reversed. For anyone who wants to know more, we recommend this Gardening Know How article on the topic. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/reversing-soil-salinity.htm

 

The Lady of Marbury sculpture by Simon O'Rourke in process

At work on a sculpture. Acton Safety have helped ensure all site work is the safest it can be for Simon and the public.

 

Marbury Lady Revisited: The Design

The Marbury Lady sculpture is essentially a two-faced woman. Although it may seem an unusual choice, it makes sense if you are familiar with local history/folklore. The legend of the Marbury Lady dates back to the time Smith-Barry occupied the hall. It involves a romance with a mistress or housekeeper (versions vary) that he brought back from his travels overseas. It is said that she haunted the house after her death, and now the land. Even now there are reported sightings of a lady in a white veil, and well as tales of strange sounds and happenings. Whether you believe in ghost stories or not, she makes an interesting subject for a sculpture…

 

The Living depiction of The Marbury Lady by Simon O'Rourke

The Egyptian girl, portrayed as she was alive

 

Marbury Lady Revisited: The Two Faces

Simon decided to show The Marbury Lady in both her manifestations. One side of the sculpture shows a living woman. The reverse shows a ghostly face, shrouded in a shredded veil. On the ‘living’ side, her expression is calm, peaceful. On the reverse she appears more gaunt, and pained.

As well as carving her with two faces to reflect the story, Simon also did this because he wanted to encourage people not just to view the sculpture passively. He wanted physical engagement with the sculpture. He wanted people drawn into a story. In carving her this way, people have to physically move round to the other side of the sculpture to see the full story. And from there, there is room to interpret as the viewer chooses.

 

Simon O'Rourke creating the Lady of Marbury sculpture

The ghostly side of the Marbury Lady shows a gaunt, sad expression

Marbury Lady Revisited: The Response

The Marbuy Lady sculpture was one of Simon’s favourite sculptures to create. It was technically challenging and stretched him creatively and technically. You can read more about this in our original Marbury Lady blog.

At the time she was received well, and it was wonderful to hear comments from people who enjoyed the piece.

One year on, it’s great to see her still making an impact. Alison Hamlin Hughes has also created some coasters with different views of the sculpture, and there have been a lot of comments on her posts appreciating Simon’s work.

As an artist, it is the client’s opinion that is most important at the end of  the day. In the case of a public sculpture, there are a lot of opinions likely to come forth! When so many are so appreciative it isboth humbling, and rewarding. Especially in this difficult season of lockdowns, to be part of bringing joy and beauty into people’s lives is a privilege.

 

The Marbury Lady Revisited: A series of four coasters featuring photos of The Marbury Lady sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

These coasters of the Marbury Lady have been created by local photographer Alison Hamlin Hughes

 

Marbury Lady Revisited: Resurrected Life

It’s also fitting that we are talking about the Marbury Lady on Easter weekend. The whole message and theme of Easter is resurrection – life revived. Turning a dead tree into a work of art is a fantastic way to give life back to that tree.

If you have a tree that is diseased, dying or dangerous, it may be possible for Simon to transform and resurrect it in the same way he did with The Marbury Lady. We recommend reading our blog “Is My Tree Suitable for a Tree Carving Sculpture” as an initial ‘self-assessment’. If it looks like it might be, contact Simon using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.

And if you have photos of his sculptures, we’d love it if you tagged him so we can see them! It’s always fun to see people enjoying Simon’s sculptures, and we love to see how they are ageing – just like this photo by Alison Hamlin Hughes.

 

The Marbury Lady Revisited: Sunset photo of the Marbury Lady

It’s lovely to see sculptures appearing online.
PC: Alison Hamlin Hughes

Photo shows an oak bench with a sculpture of shakespear sitting on the far end

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture 800 600 Simon O'Rourke

There’s no doubt about it, commissioning a sculpture by Simon can be expensive. As we explained in our blog “Why is Art so Expensive?“, there are lots of costs that go into creating a chainsaw carved sculpture. It’s not just the timber and time! This cost can be off-putting, and ultimately cause people to write off the idea. However, there are lots of ways you can raise the funds, and the cost doesn’t need to be a problem. Read on for some of our ideas about how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture…

Photo shows an oak bench with a sculpture of shakespear sitting on the far end

A multi-day project like this can be costly, but there are creative ideas for funding your commission

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Obtain a Grant

Many people don’t realise grants are available for funding certain sculptures. Where you look for that grant depends on the purpose and subject of your sculpture.
For example, if you are creating a Woodland Sculpture Trail, these are often part of the environmental education goals of an organisation. In this case you could look for grants for learning outside of the classroom, or environmental awareness.

If your sculpture is for creating an outdoor attraction, there are currently grants for business to adapt to covid regulations. Grants from the Arts Council and ArtFund provide funding to help museums, galleries and other visual arts organisations realise adventurous projects.

There are also more general grants you could consider. What about the National Lottery? Or a sculpture-specific grant? For example, The Henry Moore Foundation will sometimes offer funds as part of its mission to support sculpture across historical, modern and contemporary registers.

Although they can be elusive, there are grants to be found, so it’s worth investing time to look.

woodland sculpture trails by simon o'rourke. Photo shows a howling wolf in redwood, surrounded by trees. Located in Fforest Fawr.

This wolf forms part of the Fforest Fawr trail. There are often grants available to fund outdoor attractions like this, especially if it is part of adapting for covid regulations.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Sponsorship by a Local Company

If your sculpture benefits the community in some way, it may be possible to raise funds by asking a local company to sponsor some – or all! – of the cost. Some companies offer fund-matching which can relieve some pressure. Others will cover the cost completely, especially if they are looking to build their reputation in the area.  An example of this is Simon’s sculpture in Capenhurst. Urenco funded the entire sculpture!
There is one key principle to apply here too… You never know if you don’t ask! Be bold! Write to local companies. Reach out! The worst that can happen is they say no!
And if local companies aren’t an option, what about a national company with a local presence. Tesco Bags of Help scheme allows the community to vote for three projects at a time, so you can get up to £2000 towards the cost of a sculpture that benefits the community in some way.

how to raise funds for your tree carving sculpture: this wildlife scene in capenhurst was funded by urenco. it features various local animals in a 'totem' style and is standing on a green space with houses in the background

This wildlife scene on a village green was funded entirely by a company with a local presence

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is a bit of a buzz word, but basically describes asking lots of people for a small amount of money – usually via the internet. It’s important to choose a website that is easy to use and trusted. GoFundMe would be our top recommendation, as it’s well run, easy to use and has a solid reputation. IndieGoGo is lesser-known but also a site that allows for community projects such as a sculpture trail. It also allows you to offer incentives to donors for larger amounts. If you are wondering what those rewards could be, we have an idea! Simon offers a package that gives clients a copy of the original sketches and a DVD of the sculpture being made. Perhaps you could offer a copy of the DVD or sketch to people making large donations?

Crowdfunding in the community has the added benefit that it also gives people more of a sense of ownership or involvement in the project which always beneficial.

how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture: projects like this which are in public places could be funded through crowd sourcing. Photo shows a giant hand carved into a dead tree trunk. it is surrounded by trees.

Public sculptures like this Giant Hand of Vyrnwy could potentially be funded through crowdfunding.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Fundraising Events

Another idea for raising funds for a community sculpture is holding a fundraising event. We’re all familiar with bake sales, and there’s a reason for that. They’re popular!

Now being honest, you will need to sell a LOT of cakes to raise the money needed for a large scale sculpture or sculpture series! BUT community fundraisers can still be a help. Sponsored events, dances, quiz nights, raffles, competitions, book drives…they are all tried and tested methods.

In this category, we would also count using a website like Bonfire or Teespring to create merchandise that can easily be sold to generate funds. Using sites like these mean you don’t need to be concerned about inventory. You set up your shop, upload your products and they take care of manufacture and shipping. You have no customer service issues and you don’t have to invest money in products you may not sell. One of our team raised £3000 for medical costs incurred in the US using Bonfire, so we know it can work!

how to raise funds for a tree carving sculpture: consider fundraising events or selling merchandise  for a sculpture for a local park. Photo shows a dead yew tree trunk carved into a dragon hatching from its base

Although this was a private commission, transforming a dead tree in a local park into a sculpture like this could be done through fundraising.

 

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Monetise your Tree Carving Sculpture

Our final suggestion for raising funds for a sculpture by Simon O’Rourke, is to monetise the sculpture. That is, use it in some way to generate funds.

We don’t mean to do that all year round necessarily. In the case of something like a woodland sculpture trail, that would take away from its purpose. However, there are ways you could do this occasionally.

  • Perhaps by hosting a special moonlight walk around the trail once or twice a year with an admission fee?
  • What about selling tickets for a ‘sneak peak’ event before the official unveiling?
  • Or if you are having a sculpture created from a standing trunk on site,  IF health and safety allows for it, could you let people watch Simon carve for an hour for a donation?
  • If your sculpture is a character with a name such as Ruby the Owl, Verity the Vole, or Horatio the Hedgehog, could you run a competition to name it, or guess the name?
  • Or if the unveiling involves a celebrity, sell raffle tickets for the opportunity to be part of the ceremony and be photographed with the sculpture and celebrity?

Monetising your sculpture may not initially seem easy, but we’re sure there are ways you could do it occasionally to offset the costs.

Sculpture of a scarecrow made from oak by Simon O'Rourke. He is pointing to the sky and surrounded by bare trees.

Meet Tattybogle the scarecrow! Naming a sculpture is one of the ways to generate smalle rtirckles of money that can help offset costs of your sculpture by Simon.

How to Raise Funds for a Tree Carving Sculpture: Final Thoughts

We hope this has been helpful for you in generating some ideas for funding your tree carving sculpture by Simon. While some of them will by no means cover the cost, we hope they will be a springboard for you for other ideas as well as possibly bringing in small amounts. After all, every little helps!

Simon never wants the cost of a sculpture to be prohibitive either. So when you chat about the costs of a commission, why not ask him for some alternative ideas if the initial suggestion is too costly? Someone from the team can also talk to you about structuring payments.

Contact us using the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/
We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Perfect Portrait for You: Part Two

Perfect Portrait for You: Part Two 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

If you regularly read our blog, you’ll know that last week we began writing about the perfect portrait scultpure for you. We feel people sometimes shy away from commissioning a portrait. That can be for lots of different reasons. However, we also know that portraiture is extremely varied. Simon is also able to sculpt in many different styles and scales. This means there is ALWAYS a perfect portrait for you!

Last week we looked at some of Simon’s classic full length sculptures, and a classic bust. There is no doubt that every time Simon creates a new full full size portrait, it has impact. However, they may not be the perfect portrait for YOU. Space, budget, style preferences and more mean the perfect portrait for you might be something a little different….

Chainsaw carving artist Simon O'Rourke standing with his life size sculptures of soccer players kenny dalglish and Bill Shankley

 

The Bobble Head!

If a classic sculpture isn’t quite your thing, and you want something more ‘relaxed’, what about a bobble head?

Typically bobble heads are a figurine with a disproportionately large head mounted on a spring. This allows it to bob up and down – hence the name! They are often made as a caricature of a famous person. You can find out more in this article about the history of the bobble head as a portrait.


The perfect portrait for you, your space and your preferences might be something fun like this bobblehead sculpture of Gary Barlow. In the photo simon o'rourke is pictured with three shots of a full size sculpture of gary barlow with a disproportionately large head!

A bobble head portrait can be created in any size to suit your space. Simon can create a flattering representation, or more of a caricature or the person. They definitely bring some fun to the idea of a portrait! If a bobbing head causes you concern, don’t worry. Simon can still carve in this style with a fixed head that stays firmly in place!

perfect portrait for you might be a bobble head like this life size carving of chainsaw artist steve backus depicted with an oversized head and carrying chainsaw carving equipment

A bobble head of fellow chainsaw artist Steve Backus

The Collage/Group Portrait

Maybe you’re looking for something unique instead of a family photo. Or something to commemorate a team. n which case, the perfect portrait for you may be some kind of collage.

A collage can be created in an endless number of ways, depending on the number of subjects and how you want to pose them. Again, they are something a little different to a classic portrait. The presenters from BBC’s Country File certainly loved the sculptures Simon created for them a few years ago!

 

a perfect portrait for you and your family might be a collage. this photo is of a sculpture of multiple faces in one piece of wood.

Stylised/Modern

Are you more of a modernist when it comes to sculpture? Perhaps something more stylised would suit you. These faces were exhibition pieces Simon created at a couple of different events in 2019. You can read about their story in our Face to Face blog.
Even though they appear simple, in-person, they are incredibly striking!
Although these are not direct likenesses, they are great examples of Simon’s versatility as a portrait artist.

The ‘Cheeky Nod’

The perfect portrait for you may not actually be an actual portrait! Rather, it may be that you incorporate the features or likeness of someone into something else. Kind of a cheeky nod to the person rather than a formal depiction.

One example of that is Simon’s dragon for St George’s hospital garden. Mark Owen (former Take that singer) was the special guest who would be opening the garden. So, when Simon carved the dragon, he chose to use Mark Owen’s features in the dragon. It’s subtle, but there is definitely a fun likeness!

When might this ‘cheeky nod’ be appropriate? Maybe your club or society is commisioning  a sculpture to commemorate an event or occasion. The sculpture itself can’t be of the individual, but using the features of a specific key person on a character or object can be a fun way of acknowledging them and their involvement.

Singer Mark Owen photographed next to chainsaw carver simon o'rourke

A chainsaw carved dragon by simon o'rourke in cartoon style. The dragon's face has been carved to incorporate the features of singer Mark Owen so it bears a resemblance to him

If that’s a bit TOO subtle for you, what about using the faces of specific people on other objects? More of a ‘hybrid’ or combination than just a ‘cheeky nod’ to the person.

One client did just that. She wanted traditional ornaments for her garden, like pixies, fairies and gnomes. However, as a loving grandmother, she also wanted to depict her grandchildren. That led to the unique commission below. Simon carved these cute miniature pixies appropriately sized for her garden. Rather than imagining a character and featurs for each though, the face of each sculpture was one of the client’s granchildren!

Three traditional pixies carved in miniature on a small tree stump.

The Wall Hanging

Finally, maybe space doesn’t allow for you to have a 3D sculpture. Maybe it just isn’t your thing. In which case, these illustrated wall hangings could be the perfect portrait commission for you.

If you have read his biography, you’ll know Simon trained in illustration. He initially had aspirations to be an illustrate children’s books, and stumbled into tree carving! An alternative to a sculpture is a portrait in wood. Like all Simon’s portraits (except a bust!), wall hangings can be for individiual or group portraits. They can be created in a wood to suit your room, and make a great gift or commemorative piece.

prefect portrait for you series featuring a pyrography portrait of marilyn monroe by simon o'rourke

 

The faces of the four beatles created by simon o'rourke through burning and etching a wood panel

We hope you have enjoyed exploring some of Simon’s portrait work. We also hope you feel inspired, and know that there really is a perfect portrait for you, no matter your preference, budget, space, or occasion!

If you would like to explore commissioning a portrait, contact Simon at http://www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/

We’d love to hear from you!

The Perfect Portrait Sculpture for You: Part One

The Perfect Portrait Sculpture for You: Part One 960 960 Simon O'Rourke

There’s an app for that!
We often hear that when we need a digital solution. But did you know, when it comes to portraits, Simon’s ‘got a carve for that!’
It’s true!  Portraiture has changed a lot over the centuries, and there are lots of different ways to capture and represent a person. Whatever your preferences  or the occasion, we’re pretty sure there’s a perfect portrait sculpture for you!

 

Review of the decade 2014 Mungo Park

Portrait of explorer Mungo Park

When Portraits Go Wrong!

The idea of having a portrait done can be daunting though.
Let’s face it, there are enough comedic moments on TV shows and movies based on unveiling a portrait that horrifies the subject!
Most often, that horror seems to be because the portrait looks like a child’s drawing, or Picasso on steroids! Remember Martin’s portrait of Jackie in Friday Night Dinner?!
Before we look at some of the different portraits Simon has created, let’s look at why people sometimes don’t consider a sculpture portrait.

Actress Tamsin Greig in character as Jackie from Friday Night Dinner, standing next to the comedic portrait her onscreen husband painted.

Tapping Into Insecurities

Other times the onscreen comedy (or real life fear) is the possibility of seeing something that picks out or exaggerates features we don’t like. Like the time  James Cordon pranked David Beckham with a sculpture of himself! This fear is usually unfounded though. Portraits have almost always been flattering, and Simon’s goal is ALWAYS to create something beautiful. Not just that, but a portrait that goes beyond physical features and captures character and countenance.

David Beckham and the sculpture James Cordon used as a prank

And speaking of soccer-related sculptures, thankfully Simon’s Queen of the South footballer portraits are a MUCH better likeness than James Cordon’s David Beckham!

Simon’s Billy Houliston side by side with one of the pictures Simon used for reference

Sometimes our discomfort with the idea of a portrait isn’t so much that it DOESN’T look like us, so much as it might look  bit TOO familiar! There were certainly plenty of laughs when Steve McCroskey was ‘caught’ standing by his portrait in the movie Airplane!

Steve McCroskey by his likeness in Airplane

It was HOW BIG?!

The scale of a portrait is often find it is used for comedy too. Although entertaining, moments like that can genuinely put us off commissioning a portrait! Who else watched the Gilmore Girls scene where Loralei sees a stern Richard looming over the family home for the first time? And who else watched it and, putting themselves in that position, secretly hoped nobody ever did that to them?!

Loralei sees Richard’s portrait for the first time

Moving Beyond the Fear

All in all, TV and movies have done a great job of convincing us that portraits are associated with words like ‘pretenious’ or just plain awkward. That truly isn’t the realty though, and many people have been moved by a meaningful portrait. They can be a beautiful way to honour and commemorate somebody. Human form sculptures are one of Simon’s favourite things to carve, and his skill and versatility as an artist mean he can produce a wide range of styles and types. In this series we’ll walk through a few Simon has created over the years and explore some forms you may not have considered. We’re sure that whatever your preferences, setting or occasion, one of them is the perfect portrait sculpture for you……

A portrait created as part of Huskycup

The Classic

One of the most common sculpture portraits Simon makes are full length ‘statues’. They are always met with admiration, appreciation and even awe, no matter the subject or setting. No matter how large scale the sculpture portrait, Simon is still all about the details that make the difference between a good sculpture and a stunning piece of art.
The direction of a glance
Some texture to show the age of a face
A hair that doesn’t quite lie flat
The angle of an arm which tells a whole story

All of these and more combine to make sure that each and every full length portrait is a piece of art worthy of the person it honours.

Wooden sculpture portrait of a pilgrim sitting on a bench by simon o'rourke

 

Timbersports Full length Portraits

Simon has a real desire to understand his subject, what they did and who they were, and to bring that out in his sculptures. Look at these portraits of the Stihl Timbersports athletes! Simon created them in 2018 when his home town of Liverpool hosted the tournament. Each sculpture is a to-scale portrait of one of the athletes who took part from around the world.

Perfect sculpture portrait for you series, stihl timbersport athlete sculptures in front of the liver building

So, where and when might you commission a full length portrait sculpture?

They are most popular in public places, where they commemorate a person, event or tie in with a theme. They make a wonderful addition to village greens, halls, stadiums, theatres, and even pubs and restaurants like Mungo Park pictured at the start of the blog. Sometimes they are historic figures, relevant to a place, such as Friedrich Froebel pictured below. Other times they are deeply personal, such as the sculpture he made as a memorial to a young girl who died of leukaemia.

Classic Bust

Not everyone is looking for something so ….. large!
Full length, full size portraits are great in entrances to public buildings, open spaces and large gardens, but not always viable for the average home! If a full length, to-scale portrait is not the perfect sculpture portrait for you, a good alternative might just be a bust….

Perfect sculpture portrait for you example of elvis presley bust by simon o'rourke

These also work brilliantly indoors or out, which opens up your choices of wood too. You can read about why that’s a factor in our blog about Is my tree suitable for carving?
In brief though, indoor sculptures can be made from less durable woods, as they aren’t exposed to the elements.

As a bust can be less visible to the public, it can also be more personal. Private. Reflect aspects of our story or passions we may not want everyone to see. Maybe some ‘fan art’ of a favourite TV show or character, or a famous person we admire. We might want something as a tribute but – not want it on a scale where it has to be in front of our house for everyone to see! A bust in that case makes a wonderful gift or treat to yourself, such as the Ayrton Senna and Sherlock Holmes Simon made.

Perfect portrait sculpture for you series sherlock holmes tree carving bust by simon o'rourke

Ayrton senna chainsaw carving scultped bust by Simon O'Rourke

And Yet More Options!

These are just two options when it comes to finding the perfect sculpture portrait for you. Next week we will explore four other possibilities that you may like to consider for commemorating or honouring someone in your own life.

 

If you would like to talk to Simon about possibilities for a portrait or other commission, visit our contact page to send an inquiry.

The Case of the Sherlock Holmes Bust

The Case of the Sherlock Holmes Bust 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Sherlock Holmes. He may not have been the first recorded fictional detective, but Guinness World Records lists him as the most portrayed. Ever since his first appearance in 1887, we’ve seen him in books, comics, movies, TV series, art work and more. In fact, he’s been played by over 75 actors! Now, in 2019, we bring you: Simon O’Rourke’s tree carving ‘Sherlock Holmes Bust’.

Sherlock Holmes bust by Simon O'Rourke

The Timber

The Sherlock Holmes bust was for a private client who commissioned it as a gift. He’s made from oak which means that although he is pale at the moment and has some yellow tones, in time he will get darker. The rings and markings will become black as it makes contact with rain, and the UV rays of the sun will cause the wood to pick up greyish hues. In combination with the natural darkening, it means that as he ages, the wood will become more reminiscent of the furniture and drawing room decor of the Sherlock’s own era.

Sherlock Holmes bust by Simon O'Rourke

It’s all in the Details!

Fans of the detective will have noticed a few interesting details on the Sherlock Holmes bust that refer to Conan Doyle’s original short stories, and four novels.
Incidentally, as well using his trusted Stihl and Manpa tools for this project, Simon also used the Saburrtooth burr bits on the die grinder and some of their small rotary tools to achieve the details and texture. But back to the details! Simon included nine ‘clues’ or references to the Sherlock Holmes stories on the bust. Can you spot them all? See how many you can find before we reveal all later!

Sherlock Holmes Sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

The Inspiration

One of the problems when creating a sculpture of a character from a book, is that there isn’t a definitive image to work from as there would be a historic figure. This is only heightened when he has been represented by so many different people on screen too! As the client is a fan of the fiction and not just a particular on-screen representation of Sherlock, Simon chose the Sidney Paget illustrations as his inspiration.

Paget illustrated the original Conan Doyle stories for The Strand magazine. With over 350 illustrations created by Paget, there was no shortage of imagery to work from! Simon not only used the facial features of the Paget artwork as the basis for his carving, but was also attentive to the original stories as he added details to the bust. One of the most obvious of these is the shape of the pipe. Although we have come to associate Sherlock Holmes with a large, curved meerschaum pipe, there is actually no reference to this in the original stories. By choosing something simpler and less iconic, Simon has ensured the bust is faithful to the original illustrations rather than the images that evolved over time.

Sherlock Holmes by Simon O'Rourke

The Big Reveal!

All good detective stories end with a ‘big reveal’. Thankfully, when this sculpture was revealed to the birthday person, it was received better than the surprise the characters often get in crime fiction! We are glad to say that the client told us Sherlock arrived this afternoon and is now in its final location. We’re absolutely delighted – it is stunning!”

And now, for our other ‘big reveal’: The clues within the Sherlock Holmes Bust……

Snake and Baker Street Detail from Sherlock Holmes Sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

 

The Hidden Clues

As you look at the various views of Sherlock, you should hopefully find the following ten references to stories:

1. Stiletto dagger he used to pin correspondence to the mantle piece
2. Pince nez glasses – The Golden Pince-nez
3. Honeycomb – His Last Bow
4. Broken crown – Musgrave ritual
5. Persian slipper he used for storing tobacco

Sherlock Holmes tree carving statue by Simon O'Rourke

6. Handgun
7. 221b plaque
8. Snake – The Speckled Band
9. Violin
10. Stick Men – The Adventure of the Dancing Men

Oak Sherlock Holmes Bust by Simon O'Rourke

We loved this commission, because as well as being an opportunity for Simon to show his talent for human form, it was such a unique gift to create. If you need a beautiful, unique and sustainable gift for somebody, contact us on [email protected] to talk about the details.

Queen of the South Legends Unveiled

Queen of the South Legends Unveiled 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

Back in May we started sharing videos and photos of a statue of three footballers that Simon was working on. Five months later, we’re proud to see the statue of the Queen of the South legends finally installed and unveiled!

Queen of the South Legends statue by Simon O'Rourke unveiled in Dumfries

Queen of the South Legends Statue unveiled October 2019

The Commission

The statue was commissioned by The People’s Project and stands outside the Queen of the South stadium in Dumfries. The People’s Project exists to help rekindle community within Dumfries. It does this through practical projects, funding of community initiatives, and creating opportunities to remind people of the heritage of their town. This statue isn’t their first commission, and they have also restored or commissioned statues of Robert De Bruce, and Peter Pan.

This particular commission commemorates three of the legends of Queen of the South FC: Billy Houliston, Alan Ball, and Stephen Dobbie. Each player represents a different era, achievement and contribution to the club. To find out more about each player, visit http://www.qosfc.com/news-4765. We think it’s always inspiring to read about passion t,alent and dedication, even if football may not be your thing!

Stephen Dobbie with his likeness at the unveiling of the Queen of the South Legends by Simon O'Rourke

Current player Stephen Dobbie with his likeness at the unveiling

Making the Statue

This statue was always going to be a challenge. The original goal was to make the three life-sized players out of one piece of oak:

About to begin a project that will be a big challenge… And for once it isn't a dragon!!Three life size footballers in one log…

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Wednesday, 22 May 2019

If you watched the video, you would have seen Simon refer to a crack throughout the timber. That obviously meant he had to react immediately, and think about how to work with and around that crack. In the beginning this seemed to have a simple solution. Just turn the trunk upside down!

In addition though, he had to think not only about what that crack is like in the moment, but what would happen in years to come. It turned out that when he considered the Scottish weather, that crack was going to create some problems. Simon ended up having to cut out one player, and use a second piece of timber, as you can see in the next video. Every cloud has a silver lining though! Removing that player helped Simon overcome one of the other challenges in a 360° statue – reaching the backs of the other players!

An update on the footballers!!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Monday, 1 July 2019

Queen of the South FC statue in process after a player had been removed, allowing Simon to access the backs of the other players

The statue in process after a player had been removed, allowing Simon to access the backs of the other players

Creating a Likeness

As well as technical challenges, there was then the task of creating an accurate likeness. As we’ve mentioned in this blog, this means not only dealing with correct shape and ratio, but also the challenge of depth. In this case too, it also has to be true to life, and there isn’t as much artistic license. Especially in the case of a statue like this where the purpose is to honour people, Simon always wishes to capture them in a way which is accurate and tells a story of who they really are. For those who wonder how possible that is when using power tools, this comparison says it all!

Close up of Billy Houliston statue with one of the photos Simon worked from to create The Queen of the South legends

Billy Houliston statue with one of the photos Simon worked from

Creating Community – Not Just a Statue.

Part of the purpose of this statue was to commemorate the Queen of the South legends. It is has a bigger purpose that goes beyond this though.

The reason for commemorating these players is to remind the Dumfries community of their heritage. To remind them of town and community achievements they can be proud of. It reminds them of things they have in common like the love of a sport or a hero. It gives a focus for unity and remembering positive moments in their community. For the younger person looking at these players immortalised in wood, it gives something to aspire to. And for the older generation, it can bring about a sense of nostalgia and ‘the good old days’ that brings joy and encouragement. The kits from the different eras clearly show achievements across the years and history, and so it helps unite generations in a mutual appreciate of their team and its history.

Stephen Dobbie and club officials at the unveiling of the Queen of the South legends statue by Simon o'Rourke

Stephen Dobbie and club officials at the unveiling

And so, statues like this are more than just pieces of art to be admired. They also help unite, inspire, and promote community. Even the simple act of coming together for an unveiling ceremony helps create all these things.

If you are part of a town, club, society or community and would like to explore a similar idea, why not send us a message? As always, Simon is available on [email protected] to talk about your vision, hopes and the practical details.