oak sculpture

Photo shows a man carving a sculpture from a tree trunk. He is standing in a tall cherry picker. Equipment like this is one of the Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture 450 600 Simon O'Rourke

A chainsaw carving sculpture can be a great addition to your home or business. It’s a lovely way to give life back to a tree that is dead, diseased or dangerous. As well as being a beautiful piece of art in its own right, it can also add value to your attraction or home. However, there are lots of practical considerations to think about if you want to commission an on-site chainsaw carving sculpture. When you contact Simon, he will ask for details and photos to help him plan. This blog is to help you think about those considerations, to help make the process as smooth as possible.

Simon can travel to your home or business to create a sculpture from a standing tree.

 

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Simon’s Workspace

Ideally, Simon needs 2-3m space around the tree stump to be able to move easily and approach the sculpture from the best angle. If it’s possible to clear this space, it’s really helpful for him. However, don’t worry if this isn’t possible. If the tree stump is against a fence or something similar and he doesn’t have this space, it doesn’t mean he can’t do it – it’s just good for him to know in advance.

When thinking about the workspace it’s also worth remembering that sometimes some large pieces of timber can come down off the tree. For this reason, we suggest moving anything valuable from the area before Simon comes to set up. Nobody wants a smashed table or squashed prize-winning begonias!

oak maiden sculpture in process

This photo of the Oak Maiden in process shows the size of branches Simon sometimes has to remove

 

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Spectator Space

It’s FASCINATING to watch Simon carve! It can be tempting to want to get as close to the action as possible, and if your sculpture is for a community, inviting people to watch may even be part of generating support for the commission. However, it can also be dangerous to get too close! If you do want to watch (or invite others), you will need to make sure there is a 6m space between Simon and the next closest human being!

Crowds watching ice carving for Wrexham Museum

Crowds watch Simon from a safe distance outside Wrexham Museum*

 

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Access for Equipment

All Simon’s equipment can be carried, so in some ways distance from parking to the site doesn’t matter. BUT! Some of it is quite heavy. If you are able to make a way for him to park as close as possible to the place he will be carving, it is incredibly helpful.

Simon will also ask you for photos of his access to the site from the parking spot – especially if he needs to use scaffolding or a cherry picker. This is because slopes or other obstacles may change the equipment he needs to hire. He may also need to find a creative way of getting it to the site. This happened this week in fact, getting this cherry picker to the carving site…

Photo shows a man carving a sculpture from a tree trunk. He is standing in a tall cherry picker. Equipment like this is one of the Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture

Simon’s colleague Paul working in a cherry picker for an on site carving

 

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Additional Equipment

And while we’ve mentioned cherry pickers, let’s talk additional equipment!

Simon has his own platforms which enable him to carve a sculpture up to 2.5m without hiring extra equipment. For anything taller than that though, he will need to use scaffolding or a cherry picker. He will arrange it all, so don’t worry about suddenly having to become an expert in this area! As the client though, it’s worth knowing that this will impact the cost of the commission. It may also impact the time needed too. For example, the scaffolding for the Spirit of Ecstasy sculpture took a day to assemble!

Again, Simon will ask you for photos not just of the tree, but of the surrounding ground to help him arrange the best and safest equipment for the job.

Work in Progress: Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O'Rourke

This photo of work in progress on The Spirit of Ecstasy allow you to see suitable timber size and access for an onsite carving, as well as the scaffolding needed.

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Clean Up!

Chainsaw carving is messy! As you can imagine, there is a LOT of sawdust as well as chunks of tree. Simon is happy to do that tidy-up. However, this means paying for his time, so it’s generally better for the client to handle this part themselves. If you’re commissioning a sculpture, make sure you include time and energy for this clean up before you invite people over for an unveiling!

ThA sculpture of an ent in a monkey puzzle tree trunk. It is surrounded by sawdust. Clean up of this mess is a factor to consider whren you Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture

The Ent at Poulton Hall surrounded by sawdust! It’s important to be prepared for this, and budget time and energy for cleaning up

 

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Power supply

Simon will generally come armed with fully charged batteries, petrol etc for his chainsaws and olfi video equipment. It can be helpful though, if possible, to give him access to a plug socket or two by running an extension cable through a window.

Simon O'Rourke's giant hand of vyrnwy surrounded by scaffolding. Scaffolding hire is one of the things to consider when you commission a chainsaw sculpture

Simon’s Giant Hand of Vyrnwy before the scaffolding was taken down.

Things to Consider When You Commission an On-Site Chainsaw Carving Sculpture: Final Thoughts

We hope this helps you understand the kind of information Simon will ask for (and why) when you commission and on-site chainsaw carving sculpture. Of course, we missed out that providing copious amounts of tea, coffee and the odd jammy dodger never go amiss either!

If you’re thinking of commissioning a sculpture, we recommend reading this blog about the suitability of your tree first. It may also be helpful to read this blog about commissioning a sculpture too.

To contact Simon about a commission, use the contact form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/. We look forward to hearing from you!

Sculptures for world book day by Simon O'Rourke. An Owl sits on top of a tower of books in a 'totem pole' style sculpture.

Sculptures for World Book Day

Sculptures for World Book Day 400 600 Simon O'Rourke

If you have school-aged children you will know next Thursday is World Book Day. We’ve actually heard it might be the most dreaded day of the school year!!! Based on all the Facebook posts of the last-minute scrambling to find a costume, we that could easily be true!
Costume-panic aside though, the mission of World Book Day is fantastic. Reading for pleasure is the single biggest indicator of a child’s future success – more than their family circumstances, their parents’ educational background or their income. And so to engage with the day and celebrate, we wanted to share a selection of literature-related sculptures for world book day…

sculptures for world book day: learning to fly by Simon O'Rourke depicts a child about to soar standing on top of a tower of books

“Learning to Fly” clearly reflects the message and mission of World Book Day

Sculptures for World Book Day: Learning to Fly

This sculpture wasn’t commissioned specifically for World Book Day. However, it does reflect their message well. The child is standing on top of a tower of books, ready to fly which clearly depicts the potential we have to achieve when we have a solid foundation of reading for pleasure.

Our next sculpture has a similar message. In this case though, it is an owl sitting on the book tower though. Owls have long been associated with wisdom and learning, so it subtly reminds us of the wisdom we gain through reading.

Sculptures like this are great for libraries, nurseries, schools etc. Children often struggle to engage with reading, especially in this age of technology. However, gentle but powerful visual reminders like this can capture their attention (more so than an adult telling them!) and reinforce the message that reading is beneficial.

Sculptures for world book day by Simon O'Rourke. An Owl sits on top of a tower of books in a 'totem pole' style sculpture.

Owls are often a symbol for wisdom

Sculptures for World Book Day: Children’s Classics

Of course, you may prefer your World Book Day commission to reflect a favourite book or character. Simon has created many literary-themed sculptures over the years, including some beautiful children’s classics. Who can resist a cute Peter Rabbit (from the Beatrix Potter classics) or Hans Christian Andersen’s beautiful Little Mermaid?

Sculptures for world book day by simon o'rourke. The Little Mermaid from the Hans Christian Andersen classic.

The Little Mermaid is a much-loved children’s classic.

 

Oak sculpture of Peter Rabbit by Simon O'Rourke

Most children in the UK are familiar with Beatrix Potter Tales of Peter Rabbit

Sculptures for World Book Day: Modern Classics

Perhaps modern classics are more your thing. In which case, Simon has you covered! This Charlie and the Chocolate Factory booth was made for Cardiff’s Steak of the Art. It features many of the key characters from the Roald Dahl classic including Charlie, Oompa Loompa’s and the main man, Willy Wonka. How many references can you find?

Will wonka restaurant booth by simon o'rourke

How many ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ references can you find in this restaurant booth?

Sculptures for World Book Day: Trails

Sculpture trails are a brilliant and fun way to convey information and attract people to your venue. Books are rich with characters and events so it’s easy to tie a trail in with World Book Day – or reading in general. Or perhaps you want to celebrate an author who lived in your home town and draw visitors. to the area. Simply choose the book or author, and Simon can create a series of sculptures to be installed around the venue or town. One such trail in his portfolio is his Alice in Wonderland series created for a location in Scotland. The full series has ten sculptures, but here’s four to whet your appetite!
A trail like this is a great year-round attraction, but could become a key part of your World Book Day events and activities.

sculptures for world book day: alice in wonderland series by simon o'rourke

Sculptures for World Book Day: All-Age Classics

Over the years Simon has also created some incredible sculptures of characters from literary classics enjoyed by all ages, which could also become a feature of a World Book Day activity. When we think of classic books that all generations can enjoy, one of the first to come to mind has to be Tolkien’s Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. In fact,vital they rank at 12 and 7 respectively in the top 25 best selling books of all times. It’s no wonder then that Simon’s Lord of the Rings sculptures have also been incredibly popular when we’ve shared them.

Gollum and the Monkey Puzzle Ent are both more recent sculptures that can be viewed by the public at Poulton Hall when it is open. Radagast the Brown was a private commission, which is all the more reason to share it here so you can enjoy it too!

sculptures for world book day: gollum by simon o'rourke

Gollum is one of the characters in the classic Middle Earth series by Tolkien

 

Monkey Puzzle Ent sculpture by simon o'rourke

The Ent are a race of treefolk in the Tolkien Middle Earth books

 

radagast the brown. a sculpture in fir by simon o'rourke

This sculpture of Radagast the Brown gave new life to a diseased tree

Sculptures for World Book Day: Upcoming Sculptures

If you read our new year blog, you’ll know Simon has some more exciting literature-related commissions coming up this year. We can’t wait to share them with you! And we hope that they will somehow play a part in encouraging reading for pleasure as the sculpture prompts reading or re-reading of the book.
But we’d love to know…. who are your favourite literary characters, and which would you like to see Simon create?

As always, if you would like to see one of them realised, contact Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/

open book by simon o'rourke

Sculptures for World Book Day: Final Thoughts

Lastly, reading is SO vital in reaching our full potential, but sadly access to good books is a privilege many are denied – even in the UK! So if you are interested in the valuable work of World Book Day you can find out more about getting involved at https://www.worldbookday.com/about-us/how-can-you-get-involved/. Whether you’re a teacher looking for resources for class, a parent thinking of ways to engage your children busy, or just somebody who would like to make reading more accessible for others, there’s something for you!

 

close up of the face of the old oak father by simon o'rourke

Old Oak Father Sculpture

Old Oak Father Sculpture 1368 1824 Simon O'Rourke

This week Simon completed his final carving for 2020. If you follow us on Facebook, you may already have seen it. It’s a fantastic creation with a lovely story that we wanted to share. So why not grab a cuppa and a mince pie, and keep reading to find out about the Old Oak Father Sculpture…

Simon O'Rourke's Old Oak Father sculpture. The sculpture is carved into a standing tree trunk of a dead tree. It shows a mythical 'treefolk' old man.

The old oak father sculpture in Surrey.

The Story Behind the Name

Sometimes before a sculpture is started, Simon has a story in mind. And sometimes that story evolves. This is one of those times.
Earlier in the year Simon completed a sculpture of an oak maiden. There were other dead or dying trees on the property, so this week he returned to create another sculpture.
This sculpture actually points in the direction of the Oak Maiden which is a few fields away, and the client decided this sculpture is her father.

the old oak father sculpture by simon o'rourke

The Old Oak Father points across the fields to the Oak Maiden

Creating the Old Oak Father

Before Simon arrived on site, a tree surgeon cut the dying oak to the right size. It’s actually really helpful if this can happen beforehand, and can save on some costs too. Incidentally, if you are looking for a good tree surgeon, we recommend TreeTech.
Simon had drawn a sketch over a photo of the tree to show the client. That concept sketch was also a basis for him to work from, but as always, he had to be open to change because of the quirks of the tree. This time though there were no surprise cracks, rot, or holes, and the finished sculpture is faithful to the concept sketch.

view from the ground of the old oak father sculpture by simon o'rourke

Mystery and Whimsy

When Simon creates a sculpture, he wants people to feel they’ve seen part of a story. This is a connection with his training in illustration and love of children’s stories, fairy tales, and different worlds.
In this case, Simon wanted him to have a feel of age, eternity, and mystery. To create that feel, he used lots of spirals similar to the trunks of gnarly old trees. That’s why viewing the sculpture feels like meeting an old man. Well, that and the beard!!!
Spirals also add a sense of mystery and intrigue. The lines are forever disappearing, and you never reach the beginning or end, adding to the sense of age and eternity.
There is also wisdom, acceptance, and calm in his eyes – like one who has witnessed many things and found his peace with the world.

That ancient, mysterious feel of the finished piece inspired Simon to write a beautiful short story:

The Oak Father…
The old oak,
bereft of leaves,
leaned into the oncoming winds of winter.
He would weather it like he always had done,
close his eyes once more,
and dream of Spring.
close up of the face of the old oak father by simon o'rourke

Connection & Relationship

There is also a lot about ‘connection’ in this sculpture. The organic lines and the sculpture using the natural shape of the tree very much connect it with the earth. The direction of his gaze, pointing hand, and similarity of style connect this old oak father with his daughter. And the viewer becomes connected when they are drawn into that story.
For those who are interested, Simon shares his thoughts on that sense of connection and relationship as well as on the sculpture itself in this five-minute video…

The Aging Oak Maiden

Obviously Simon couldn’t resist popping on the original Oak Maiden to see how she’s doing too while he was on the property. She’s looking great and aging nicely with those darker hues and deeper shadows enhancing the sculpture

oak maiden sculpture by simon o'rourke

Write Your Own Story

We hope you’ve enjoyed finding out a bit more about the Old Oak Father sculpture. And if he inspires any storytelling in you, why not drop us a comment or send us an email to let us know? It’s always great to hear how Simon’s work has impacted you.

You can email him using the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact which is also the best way to contact Simon if you would like to commission a sculpture.

Next blog we’ll be back with the sculpture highlights of 2020, and until then wish you all a Merry Christmas.

a pair of lion sculptures: photo features the face of the oak lion mentioned in the accompanying blog

A Pair of Lion Sculptures

A Pair of Lion Sculptures 1824 1368 Simon O'Rourke

If you had been traveling on the M6 last weekend you might have seen a strange sight. A pair of lion sculptures making their way to their home in Colchester!

Photo shows a pair of wooden lion sculptures tied to the back of a flatbed trailer.

The lion sculptures in transit

A Pair of Lion Sculptures: The Client

The lions were commissioned by  The Lion Brasserie in East Bergholt. It doesn’t take much of a jump to see why they chose to commission a big cat sculpture! The larger lion sits in front of the building, and the second, smaller lion will be installed on the wall near the doorway. He’ll replace a fibreglass lion that is currently in place.

a wooden sculpture of a lions face with a pub sign in the background that says 'The Red Lion'

Photocredit to The Lion Brasserie

About the Redwood Lion Sculpture

Simon made the pair of lion sculptures in his workshop, then later transported them to Colchester. The smaller lion is made from redwood which is a similar colour to the current fibreglass sculpture. It’s a fitting choice as the name of the pub is The Red Lion!
For this sculpture, Simon had to work within a specific framework, as the pub is a listed building, and the sculpture was going to be mounted on the wall. This meant specific pose and size requirements.
This kind of thing can be intimidating to potential clients, but don’t worry! Simon is experienced and knows the right questions to ask. He will always ensure that your sculpture meets any necessary regulations as well as aesthetic preferences.

redwood lion sculpture in a workshop

The redwood lion in Simon’s workshop

About the Oak Lion

The large oak lion stands around 2m (7′) tall. With his well-defined muscles, mane, and noble expression, he’s definitely a presence! If you follow Simon on Facebook, you will have seen he had a bit of a false start on this one. As we have mentioned in our blogs about rot and aging, wood is not an exact science. Sometimes it’s difficult to “read the log” and an old wound can lead to a pocket of rot that isn’t visible from the outside. That was the case with this lion…

an abandoned unfinished wood sculpture of a lion

The abandoned stump!

This isn’t always a bad thing though! In this case Simon wasn’t totally happy with the first lion’s pose. The rot allowed him to start over and create something he was much happier with.

a wood lion sculpture standing on a tree stump outside a red brick building

Thoughts on Carving Lions

This year Simon has actually had several lion commissions. Each one is an opportunity to build on his past experience while also creating something fresh. For readers who are curious about his process, he talks about it in this blog about creating big cats. One key point is always understanding the underlying anatomy. It might be surprising then that his biggest ‘trade secret’ is not a technical anatomy book for artists (although there are some great ones around). Rather, a great place to start your research for any artistic project is… PINTEREST!!!!
A simple search can bring up a wealth of resources and give you pictures to work from as well as directing you to blogs, videos and tutorials. Being able to save images to different boards is also a helpful way of organising research.

close up of the face of an oak lion sculpture

A Pair of Lion Sculptures: Customer Reactions

Although the second lion hasn’t been installed yet, customers have enjoyed the new addition. The oak lion has captured attention and imagination, and the owners say the reaction has been ‘amazing’. And that is the most important part!
If you happen to be in the area, we recommend checking out The Lion brasserie. The food is great, and the staff are lovely. And if you’re there, we’d love it if you tagged us in any photos of the lions, and drop us a comment to know what you think.

Your Own Lion Sculpture

If you would like your own lion sculpture, Simon would love to chat with you. You can find out more HERE about how to commission a sculpture. Simon makes it as easy as possible for you from the initial ideas through to installing the final piece. And as always, you can contact him via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.

In conclusion, we leave you with a few thoughts from Simon on carving big cats…


 

face of the gollum sculpture at poulton hall by simon o'rourke

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture 1368 1824 Simon O'Rourke

Over the last few weeks we posted photos on social media of a Gollum sculpture Simon created. Thank you to those of you who left kind comments. It’s always encouraging to hear and see you enjoying Simon’s pieces. As always, there were questions about how to see it in real life, and about how Simon made it. And so, in this week’s blog we walk you through the process of creating the Gollum sculpture.

Sculpture of Gollum carved into a standing tree trunk, surrounded by the gardens at Poulton Hall. Sculpture is the work of chainsaw carving artist Simon O'Rourke

About the Sculpture

Regular readers will remember that in July Simon created an Ent sculpture from a Monkey Puzzle trunk in the grounds of Poulton Hall;  the seat of the Lancelyn-Green family. The father of the current incumbent was Roger Lancelyn Green – well known author, member of The Inklings, and friend of J R R Tolkien. This connection was the inspiration for a Lord of the Rings sculpture, which ties in with some of the other sculptures in the ground which are also based on Fastasy Literature.
As well as the standing monkey puzzle stump, there was a good, workable piece of the monkey puzzle trunk left over. It was perfect for creating another Lord of the Rings sculpture for the grounds of the hall. In this case Simon created something better known: Gollum.

3m tall scultpure of an Ent, created from the stump of a monkey puzzle tree by chainsaw artist Simon o'Rourke

The Ent at Poulton Hall

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Evaluating the Timber

The first thing Simon does when he starts a sculpture, is evaluate the timber. There are a few things he looks out for. However the first is definitely looking at what is useable, and where there is rot. For those who are interested, Simon explains a bit more in this video about different kinds of rot. For those who prefer to read, we also have this blog explaining the difference between white and brown rot.
In the case of this stump, it looked pretty nasty on the outside, but had some good, solid timber on the inside.

The process of creating the gollum sculpture step one. Simon evaluates the wood. Photo shows a large stump of monkey puzzle tree lying horizontally on the ground. It appears to be rotten. A chainsaw sits on the top.

The monkey puzzle stump Simon used to create the Gollum sculpture.

Simon also has to evaluate the timber from an artistic perspective. Using his original sketches as a guide, he has to imagine the figure within the stump. This includes thinking about the position of the figure, and what sections can be used. He pays attention to any visible branches, knots and other characteristics that he can use to help give shape to the figure. He also needs to find the point at which he wants the head to sit. From there he can work out the size and proportions.

The process of creating the gollum sculpture: photo shows SImon O'Rourke's original sketches of the sculpture. It shows the face from three angles, and two full length sketches of the sculpture.

Simon’s original sketches for the Gollum sculpture.

 

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Removing Large Facets

The next part of Simon’s process as he created the Gollum sculpture was to remove large pieces of the wood and outline the basic figure of Gollum. For this, he will use a ‘meaty’ chainsaw like the Stihl MS500i. It’s well suited to harvesting and processing large timber, but also makes easy work of this part of creating a sculpture!
Simon will still consider the original sketch, but at this point may need to change or adapt certain parts. As we have said before, wood is unpredictable. At this stage he may find pockets of rot, cracks and knots as he strips back the timber. All of these may mean needing to alter angles or even change a pose.
In Simon’s own words, this stage of the process is all about “working into the wood and working with it”.

The process of creating the gollum sculpture: photo shows simon o'rourke using a chainsaw to remove large pieces of wood from the trunk of a monkey puzzle tree. he wears stihl clothing and uses a chainsaw. a figure is beginning to emerge in the top half or the timber.

This part of the process is when Simon discovers problems or characteristics which will determine the basic figure of a sculpture

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Whittling Down the Figure

The next stage in the process of creating Gollum was whittling down the basic figure so the pose and proportions were correct. Most human form sculptures have specific fixed points and proportions that need to be considered at this stage. There is sometimes a formula for working those out, for example, The Golden Ratio. In the case of Gollum though, he is almost a caricature with certain features in very different proportion to a typical human. So in creating something like Gollum, Simon had to forget normal proportions and ratios.
Things he had to particularly consider were Gollum’s large head in comparison with his much skinnier body and limbs!

process of creating the gollum sculpture: photo shows a very basic outline of gollum carved into a tree trunk. there are no details such as fingers, face or clothing

It’s important to get the basic shape of the body correct at this point before details are added

It’s important for Simon to get this right at this stage. If he began working on details like facial features before this is done, it would be easy to make a mistake that can’t be corrected once the wood is removed. In particular, an anatomically correct head shape gives Simon the reference points to begin adding facial features.

process of creating the gollum sculpture: photo shows simon o'rourke using a chainsaw to create the head shape of gollum's head from a monkey puzzle stump

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Creating the Face

Once Simon is happy with the shape and pose, he can begin working on the facial features. One of Simon’s strengths as an artist is that his work always tells a story and invites the viewer to participate. The face is a key part in that. And that means Simon always needs to have a back-story in mind which will determine the facial expression. In the case of the Gollum sculpture, Simon wanted to go for a look of surprise. The sculpture is more reminiscent of Gollum’s alter-ego, Smeagal. He has just caught a fish which he is about to eat, and is caught off guard by someone or something disturbing him. The moment Simon captures in this sculpture is when Gollum turns to face the thing that has disturbed him, surprise on his face.

Surprisingly, at this stage, Simon doesn’t usually switch to smaller tools yet, and will still use a chainsaw! He is still able to create a lot of detail just by using a smaller chainsaw (such as the Stihl MSA 200c) and a smaller blade.

process of creating the gollum sculpture: simon o'roruke uses a stihl msa200c chainsaw to add facial features to the sculpture

Simon uses the Stihl MSA 200c to add facial features to Gollum

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Refining the Facial Detail

The final stage of creating a sculpture is to refine the details on the face – and indeed the rest of the sculpture. At this point Simon will use a Milwaukee angle grinder with Manpatools multicutter or Saburrtooth burr bits. The latter are especially great for adding shape and texture. For those who are interested in finding out more about how to use these tools, we have a blog about Simon’s favourite burr bits and how he uses them HERE. We also have a blog about the Manpatools tools he favours HERE.

Simon O'Rourke uses saburrtooth burr bits and a milwaukee angle grinder to add texture to the face of a Gollum sculpture

Simon will often use these smaller tools to get into small nooks and crannies and create small, deep features. The gaps in Gollum’s teeth in the photo above are a great example of this.
Unlike visual art where there are different tones and colours that can be used, Simon is dependant on different depths of cut creating shadows which create the illusion of shape and texture. This means that at this stage he may need to exaggerate some cuts and create depths or gaps that are deeper than they would be in real life. Examples of this in the Gollum sculpture are the eyes, toes, and the tunic.

close up of the face of the gollum sculpture created by chainsaw artist simon o'rourke

The Eyes

In the case of the eyes, Simon used the eye bit to create a deep cavity, where our eyes would usually be a ball shape. He left wood in place, and so created the illusion of a pupil.

close up of the toes on simon o'rourke's gollum sculpture.

The Toes

We can also see this exaggerated cut in the toes. Simon has created much deeper cuts than we actually have if we examine our bare feet. The shadow this creates help give the impression of five distinct digits. If he didn’t do this, the viewer would have only the impression of a foot rather than a realistic representation.

process of creating the gollum sculpture: close up of the tunic shows the exaggerated cuts simon uses to create shadow

The Tunic

The final example of these exaggerated cuts is the tunic, photographed above. In reality, this tunic would lie flat against Gollum’s legs. Simon, however, has made a deep cut along the edge of the tunic, which creates a thicker edge to the tunic, several centimetres removed from the leg underneath. This trick is what allows us to see that Gollum is indeed wearing clothing! Without that exaggerated gap and with no difference in the colour between the body and clothing, we wouldn’t be able to see the clothing from a distance.

process of creating the gollum sculpture: close up of simon o'rourke using a saburr tooth eye bit to create the cavity that will be gollum's eye

Process of Creating the Gollum Sculpture: Knowing When to Finish

The final stage of creating a sculpture is refining the rest of the sculpture. This may include texture or folds in clothing, wrinkles in the skin or the fold of an elbow or knee. At this point though, the key part in the process is…. knowing when to finish!

Simon – like most artists – is committed to excellence. In a quest for perfection though, it can be easy to ‘over do’ it. There will always be small tweaks and refinements that can be made. However, Simon has to consider that those things may actually take away from a sculpture of this nature.
Simon also can’t rely on ‘am I happy with this?’ to determine if something is finished. Like most artists, he can be over critical and see flaws or things he would do differently next time, so that point may never come!

And so, at this point, Simon will be asking is the pose correct? Are all the proportions correct? Is the overall effect as it should be?
Yes?
Then the sculpture is finished!
And in the case of Gollum, we hope you agree that it’s another fantastic piece.

gollum sculpture by simon o'rouke

Sculpture of Gollum carved into a standing tree trunk, surrounded by the gardens at Poulton Hall. Sculpture is the work of chainsaw carving artist Simon O'Rourke

Any Questions?

If you have any questions about Simon’s process as an artist, we would love to answer them! You can contact Simon through his Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or by filling out the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.
That form is also the contact if you would like to commission your own sculpture.

Lastly, if you would like to see Simon creating this sculpture and hear his own thoughts on the process, we will have a video on Simon’s YouTube channel soon. Watch this space!

 

 

Wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke. A large piece of timber stands horizontally with the logo for BIFOR carved inti it by simon o'rourke

Wood Logos and Emblems

Wood Logos and Emblems 2048 1158 Simon O'Rourke

This week on Twitter we posted a flashback to the time Simon created this fantastic logo for Olfi. We started thinking about other wood logos and emblems Simon has made. We had fun looking back, so decided to share some in this blog. Who knows, maybe you’ll feel inspired for your own company or organisation! Oh! Full story about the Olfi logo and Simon’s partnership with them right HERE!

Free-standing Sculptures

Some of the logos and emblems Simon has made, have been free standing sculptures. These are usually large and indicate an entrance or building. We feel it’s especially worth considering a wooden sculpture if your building is in a wooded or green environment. The sculpture is much more sympathetic to its surroundings than something metal or plastic, and much more pleasing to the viewer. It’s also a more environmentally friendly option as Simon sources his timber from trees that have died or had to be removed or cut back for other reasons.

Wood logos and emblems by SImon O'Rourke: RSPB COnway. Four planks of wood stand around 4' tall with a bird and RSBP burned onto them. Three men stand behind the sign.

This RSPB sign is our first example of Simon’s free-standing wood logos and emblems. The sustainability of word ties in with the organisation’s ethos, and it looks great against the background of this reserve. A wooden sculpture – even a logo! – actually makes a nice feature for people to stand next to and photograph themselves when they visit. Which in turn makes for more publicity for your organisation when people share their photos online. Makes it a bit of a win on many levels!

simon o'rourke kneels in front of a large piece of timber and uses a chainsaw to carve the logo for BIFOR into the wood

Simon working to create a sign for the Institute of Forest Research at the University of Birmingham.

Wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke. A large piece of timber stands horizontally with the logo for BIFOR carved inti it by simon o'rourke

National Emblems

Maybe you don’t want your name on a sign, but want something that still captures something of who you are or what you do. Here we have a couple of very different examples that show there really are wooden logos and emblems for everyone!!!

Our first example is this redwood carving of the Prince of Wales Feathers. Although it is English in origin, it has become synonymous with Wales and all things Welsh.  So much so, the Rugby fans among you will recognise it as the emblem on the national kits.

This particular emblem sculpture was for a housing development in North Wales. The words ‘Ich dien’ on the emblem mean ‘I serve’ (replaced with WRU on the rugby kits!). That made it even more fitting for this housing development which used to be an army barracks. And as someone once asked about the colour, no it didn’t stay pink!!! Redwood is a pink-ish red when it is first cut down and carved. Over time though, it turns a rich, deep brown. For examples, this article on Tongwnlais.com about my Fforest Ffawr Woodland Sculpture Trail has some lovely photographs of aging redwood sculptures.

Wood logos and emblems: 6' redwood carving of prince of wales feathers by Simon O'Rourke.

Local Logos

Our next examples are two of Simon’s charity fundraising pieces. You can read more in our blog ‘A New Bird in Town‘, but basically they were made to auction off at fundraising events for R Charity – the charity for The Royal Liverpool Hospitals. Local symbols like this can make great pieces for an office or garden, whether at home or for the community. When a sculptures represents the area the way these do, it’s also more likely to hold meaning and capture attention if you are looking for a piece for your own fundraiser. If you have a fundraiser coming up, why not chat to Simon via www.treecarving.com/contact/ and see if something similar could be what you need?

Two wooden sculptures of liverbirds are shown side by side. Sculptures are one of the wood logos and emblems made by Simon O'Rourke

Patrotic Art

Our next example of wood logos and emblems is this stunning Sri Lankan lion sculpture. It was commissioned as a combined birthday-retirement gift – and what an incredible gift!
You may (understandably!) be wondering how it ties in with wood logos and emblems. However, if you look closely, the lion is holding a sword – like the lion on the Sri Lankan flag!
Obviously the lion looks a little different to the one depicted on the flag! However, bringing a flag to life like this is a lovely way to honour/reflect your heritage in a piece of art. Another similar option could be to commission a sculpture of your national or regional flower, animal, or bird. Definitely lots of ways to bring a logo or emblem to life through sculpture!

My client and her husband with Singha the lionA Derby 

Spirit of Ecstasy

One of the largest wood logos and emblems Simon has made is this sculpture of The Spirit of Ecstasy. For those unfamiliar with the figure, she is the figurine found atop Rolls Royce cars. Simon created her for an enthusiast, and she makes a striking addition to the garden.
Just like the lion, she shows that a logo or emblem can still be a beautiful piece of art. It also shows again, that sculptures of logos and emblems aren’t just for places of business. Perhaps a Ferrari enthusiast in your life would like a prancing horse sculpture? Or maybe someone in your life is a fan of a sports team and you’d like something based on that? An owl for a Sheffield Wednesday fan? A Derby County ram? Whatever the hobby or interest, we’re sure there’s a way of turning it into a beautiful sculpture…

Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O'Rourke

Spirit of Ecstasy by Simon O’Rourke

Wall Signs

Perhaps a sculpture isn’t quite for you. Another alternative would be a wall hanging, such as this lovely bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree project.

bespoke sign for the Joshua Tree centre by simon o'rourke

Many businesses, charities, community groups, churches and individuals look to have some kind of signage. Again, a wooden logo, emblem or signage makes a great environmentally-friendly/sustainable option compared to some of the alternatives. If you have a logo, this can be the entire sign (as with the Joshua Tree) or could be a much smaller reference, such as this company sign below.

wood logos and emblems by simon o'rourke : sample wall hanging with the letter R carved into a corner and the rest blank for engraving a name or phrase

As you may remember, Simon also has a background in illustration. This means that he is also able to create beautiful and unique illustrations on wooden wall hangings. These could be incorporated into a sign for a home and could range from portraits of the residents to something that reflects the surroundings. How great would this cow be on an entrance sign to a farm or homestead?

illustrated wooden wall hanging by simon o'rourke

Your Own Wood Logos and Emblems

Whatever your company, community group, team or passion, we’re pretty sure there’s something Simon can create to meet your need! Whether you want a sculpture to reflect a company, country or activity or want specific signage, we welcome your inquiries.
Fill out the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will be in touch to discuss ideas and details. We look forward to hearing from you!

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke stands between life size wood sculptures of Bill Shankly and Kenny Dalglish, two of many sporting sculptures made by simon

Sporting Sculptures made by Simon

Sporting Sculptures made by Simon 1536 2048 Simon O'Rourke

by  This week on Twitter we shared a portrait of sporting legend Bill Shankly that Simon made. He was one of four famous Liverpudlians that Simon created live at the Pierhead in 2018. Afterwards, the sculptures were all auctioned off for children’s charity, Variety. It got us thinking about other sports figures Simon has carved in the past and inspired this blog! And so, we hope you enjoy revisiting these sporting sculptures made by Simon over the years…

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke stands between life size wood sculptures of Bill Shankly and Kenny Dalglish, two of many sporting sculptures made by simon

Simon with his portraits of Kenny Dalglish and Bill Shankly

Sporting Sculptures Made by Simon: Queen of the South Footballers

Staying with the football (soccer for our international readers!) theme, our first flashback is to the Queen of the South players from 2019. This sculpture was installed outside the Queen of the South ground in Dumfries and represents three generations of football. Each of the players represents a different era, achievement, and contribution to the club. We think you’ll agree that each one is a fantastic likeness to the person…

photograph of billy houliston in his soccer kit shown alongside a wooden lifesized sculpture of the player made by artist simon o'rourke

Sculpture of Billy Houliston next to one of the photos Simon worked from to create the sculpture

Making the sculpture definitely had its challenges though! Originally, the hope was to create the sculpture out of a single piece of oak. However, as Simon began to work, he discovered a large crack in the timber. He initially thought he could overcome that by turning the piece upside down. BUT! Once he also factored in the Scottish weather, he realised that crack was going to cause problems. Thankfully he found another suitable piece of wood to use and attached that sculpture to the other two. Despite this hiccup, the club, fans, and players were all delighted with the finished sculpture. If you would like to know more about the story behind this sculpture, why not read our blog: Queen of the South Legends Unveiled?

sporting sculptures made by simon o'rourke. Photo shows sculpture of three soccer players standing back to back with onlookers admiring the piece

Stephen Dobbie pictured at the unveiling with his likeness

 

Sporting Sculptures Made by Simon: Vintage Cricketer

Moving on to another classic British sport now, we bring you Simon’s vintage cricketer!
The cricketer has had lots of attention in the past. Whenever we share the photos it’s definitely a popular sculpture! Contrary to what people expect though, it isn’t actually based on anybody in particular.
It was a commission from Hopkins Homes in 2019, and they just wanted ‘a vintage cricketer’. The company was building a housing estate on the former site of Norfolk County Cricket Club and felt the sculpture would be a meaningful addition to one of the green spaces. The site certainly had a lot of history. Five first-class and 13 a-list matches were played there during its time as a cricket ground!
Simon researched what the sport looked like during the 19390s, and created a sculpture of a player recognisable as being from that era.

Cricketer in Situ:

For those who would like to see the cricketer in situ, we recently found a website with photos of varying sporting sculptures – and the cricketer is there!  Visit http://www.offbeat.group.shef.ac.uk/statues/STUK_Anonymous_50.htm to have a peak!

sporting sculptures by simon o'rourke. diptych of his vintage cricketer made in cedar

man wearing protective ear wear carves a face out of cedar using a stihl chainsaw

Sporting Sculptures Made by Simon: Jockey

The next of our sporting sculptures flashbacks is a very different sport. Horse racing!

Simon created this sculpture in 2015. Like the cricketer, it isn’t based on anybody in particular, but one of Simon’s employees thought it looked like Norman Wisdom! What do you think?!

triptych showing different angles a jockey carved in oak, one of many sporting sculptures made by simon o'rourke

 

Sporting Sculptures Made by Simon: ‘Skater Chick’

Did you know skateboarding was going to make its debut in the Olympic Games in Tokyo this year? Even though The Games didn’t happen, we think it means we can definitely include this sculpture of a ‘Skater Chick’ that Simon made in 2010. You can find her in Eirias Skate Park in Colwyn Bay, North Wales. As always, Simon invites us into a moment in a bigger story with this sculpture. We love that she is ‘mid trick’ and that the movement Simon has created throughout the clothes and with his attention to anatomy, really shows the energy, passion, and skill of this fictional skateboarding girl.

wooden life size sculpture of a female skateboarder standing on one hand to perform a trick

sporting sculptures made by simon o'rourke: a wooden sculpture of a female skateboarder performing a trick on one hand

Sporting Sculptures Made by Simon: Timbersports

Did you know Timbersports is a thing? There’s actually a world championship where people from around the globe compete against each other. The athletes compete in the use of axes and saws in manners typical for ‘lumberjacks’. Stihl founded the world championship in 1985 and it grew over the years. It now includes six different disciplines, and collegiate and rookie leagues. As you may expect, this year’s championship was cancelled. However, we look forward to a return in 2021!
Anyway, back to the sculptures!

life-sized wooden sculptures of four timbersports athletes stand in front of a large building

In 2018 the Timberpsports championship was held in Simon’s hometown of Liverpool. Stihl commissioned him to create life-sized sculptures of some of the participating athletes. The sculptures stood in the entrance and greeted spectators as they arrived. So fun!
Once again these sculptures show Simon’s ability to create an accurate likeness and tell a story in his portraits. Jason Wynard definitely seems to approve of his!

sporting sculptures made by simon o'rourke: jason wynard stands next to a life-sized wooden portrait of himself. They are outside a dock building.

 

Commissioning a Sporting Sculpture by Simon

As you can see, sporting sculptures can make a perfect addition to a sports ground or an event. They help tell stories of a place and honour the people who take part. They can connect generations too in the love of a hero, team or sport. And they always make a fine attraction!

Bizarrely for someone who lives in Wales, Simon is yet to create a rugby sculpture. Could you be the first?! Or maybe you’re more of a tennis, swimming or even cheese rolling fanatic?!

Whatever the sport, if you would like to commission a sporting sculpture, we would love to hear from you. As always, although you can reach us on social media, we recommend filling out the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/. We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Chainsaw artist Simon O'Rourke putting finishing touches on a 3m sculpture of svantevit, the slavic god of war. Svantevit is one of his many sculptures of myths and legends.

Sculptures of Myths and Legends

Sculptures of Myths and Legends 1365 2048 Simon O'Rourke

Mythology and folk stories have been the subject of several sculptures Simon has made. Each time there is a challenge for Simon. He needs to create something recognisable and something that tells the well-known story. At the same time though, he also wants to bring something fresh or unique. Creating sculptures of myths and legends helps preserve a culture, and aids us in passing down the stories that shaped a nation. It’s a lovely thing to be part of!
In this week’s blog, we invite you to join us as we revisit some of the sculptures of myths and legends that Simon has made…

Close up of St Georg in the St George and the dragon sculpture by Simon O'Rourke. This is one of his many sculptures of myths and legends.

St George and the Dragon

St George and the Dragon is the most recent of Simon’s sculptures of myths and legends. The client had a stump in her garden and contacted Simon to see what he could make of it. Many sculptures of St George show him either doing battle with the dragon or victorious after the fight. The client didn’t want anything too macabre in her garden though – understandably!!! So, in this case, Simon depicts George before the battle. We see him standing in his armour with weapons ready, as the dragon creeps up the stump towards him. If you would like to know more about the choice of St George, or the process of making the sculpture, visit our St George and the Dragon blog.

Sculptures of myths and legends: a portrait of st george and the dragon are carved into a standing tree stump. The sculpture is surrounded by flowering shrubbery. carved by simon o'rourke.

Svantevit

The next of our sculptures of myths and legends takes us to Eastern Europe. Svantevit is the Slavic god of war, fertility, and abundance. It was created for the exhibition at Putgarten, Germany in 2018. With his four heads, he is immediately recognisable to people familiar with Slavic mythology. He is also carrying a horn and sword which are an important part of the stories of Svantevit. Simon makes his mark though with his detail in the faces and texture in the clothing. The drapery in the cape in particular adds some lovely movement to this 3m sculpture.

Chainsaw artist Simon O'Rourke putting finishing touches on a 3m sculpture of svantevit, the slavic god of war. Svantevit is one of his many sculptures of myths and legends.

The Hydra

The Hydra from 2019 is the next of our sculptures of myths and legends Simon has created. Initially, this sculpture was going to be a flock of birds or an animal rising from the ground. When Simon arrived on-site though he found the tree was unsuitable and chose to create the Hydra instead. The devil is definitely in the detail as they say with this one though. Look at all that scaly texture and the individual teeth! Definitely a legendary sculpture!!!

Hydra tree carving sculpture by Simon O'Rourke, one of his sculptures of myths and legends

Close up of the Hydra Heads. A private tree carving commission by Simon O'Rourke

Close up of the heads showing the detail and texture.

Lancelot and Guinevere

From Eastern Europe and Greece, we come much closer to home for the next of Simon’s sculptures of myths and legends: Lancelot and Guinevere.
Simon created this sculpture at an event in 2010, and it beautifully depicts the romance between the two characters. Even if we had never heard the story of Lancelot and Guinevere before, we get a sense of that story through the characters’ pose and facial details. Their eyes alone tell a story! Although not as textured as Simon’s later sculptures, we also love the hints of movement in the clothing which add to the realism.
Simon named this sculpture ‘Forbidden Fruit’. This sense of the romance being taboo or forbidden is enhanced by his choice to show the characters beneath a fruit tree, which hints at the story of Adam and Eve eating the forbidden fruit in the book of Genesis.

sculptures of myths and legends by simon o'rourke: guinevere kneeling at the feet of lancelot under a tree

Tegid Foel

Our next sculpture is another Welsh legend… Tegid Foel! Also known as ‘The Giant of Penllyn’!
Although the legend of Tegid Foel may be Welsh, he was created many miles away at Chetwynd International Chainsaw Carving Championship in 2012. Tegid Foel is the husband of Ceridwen in Welsh mythology. Funnily, the translation of his name into English would be ‘Tacitus the Bald’! Simon truly captures that description in this sculpture!
Just as Tegid Foel is a giant in Welsh mythology, this sculpture stands around 14′ tall. Simon carved him in separate parts and assembled him using scaffolding and a forklift truck. For anyone interested, Simon has an album documenting the process of creating Tegid Foel on Facebook. Just click HERE to see it. It also has close-up photos of details like the feet, belt, and hands. We definitely think it’s worth a look!


Sculptures of myths and legends: A giant sculpture of tegid foel by simon o'rourke.

Mabinogion Characters

Our last sculptures of myths and legends are also Welsh in origin. The Mabinogion is a compilation of Welsh stories, originally written in Middle Welsh. It’s thought they were compiled in the 12th Century but were passed down orally for years before that.
Back in 2010, Simon created sculptures of several of the characters in the Mabinogion (both human and animal) for a holiday park in Wales. There is something special about living and working in Wales, and being able to help preserve the history and culture of the nation in this way. Just like Tegid Foel, Simon added a full album of the Mabinogion on Facebook which you can visit HERE.
For now, we will just share these few.  The rougher ‘unfinished’ textures blend perfectly with the wooded surroundings. In Autumn they compliment the colours of the Welsh hills and woods, and in summer they contrast beautifully.

Sculptures of myths and legends: a triptych of wooden sculptures of characters from the mabinogion by simon o'rourke

Why Create Sculptures of Myths and Legends?

As we said, a sculpture of a local myth or legend helps us preserve culture. In generations past, we might have spent time telling local stories to one another or reading them for ourselves. The world has expanded massively though. Although this opens up new experiences and learning for us, which is fantastic, it is sometimes at the cost of losing something of our own history. Commissioning a sculpture that depicts local folklore can really help in sharing something of the history and culture with visitors and locals alike.

If you would like to commission your own sculpture of a myth or legend, contact us via the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will be in touch!

tv themed sculptures: egg case for game of thrones by simon o'rourke

TV Themed Sculptures

TV Themed Sculptures 800 800 Simon O'Rourke

Last week we began a series of blogs sharing some of Simon’s ‘fan art‘. That is, sculptures he has made over the years based on books, tv, music, sports, etc. Strictly speaking, it isn’t ‘fan art’ as Simon himself may not be the fan, but rather the client. The description kind of fits though! Last week we kicked the series off with sculptures based on literature. This week we bring you TV themed sculptures…

TV themed sculptures by simon o'rourke. Picture shows wooden chainsaw carved sculptures of wallace, gromit and shaun the sheep from the Nick Park series

TV Themed Sculptures: Wallace and Gromit

The first of our TV themed sculptures are these pieces based on Wallace and Gromit. The lovable duo was an immediate hit when they debuted in 1989. Yes, you read that right, 1989. They really are 31 years old! What started as an animated ‘short’ turned into seven TV movies and various TV series. Nick Park created the original characters from clay, but we think the wooden version is just as lovable! Simon created his Wallace, Gromit, and Shaun the sheep from Douglas fir over several days in the workshop. You can watch the process in the timelapse below…

TV Themed Sculptures: Sherlock Holmes

The next of our sculptures based on TV shows are Sherlock Holmes. Although he was originally a literary character, there have been so many representations of him on our screens over the years, it would seem wrong not to include him! In fact, the detective stories are so popular, he has been portrayed by over 75 different actors!
This sculpture was commissioned as a gift for a fan around the end of 2019. Simon didn’t just carve a portrait of the famous detective though. He also included references to ten different stories that you can look for in the pictures. If you can’t find them though, you don’t need to feel frustrated. We have the answers in our blog: The Case of the Sherlock Holmes Bust.

Sherlock Holmes Sculpture by Simon O'Rourke, one of his tv themed sculptures created in 2019

 

TV Themed Sculptures: Saturday Night Stars

Our next sculptures are based on two very large TV personalities. In fact, if you watched Saturday night television, for three decades this Scouse duo would have featured on your screens: Cilla Black and Ken Dodd.

Both originating from Liverpool, the two were carved live at the Pierhead in Liverpool in 2018. Simon chose to portray Cilla in her 60s pop star era – although she was better known later for presenting ‘Suprise, Surprise’ and Blind Date. Comedian Ken Dodd is unmistakable too, holding his famous ‘tickle stick’! As well as the fantastic sculptures, we love the sneaky appearance here too of Poppy, Simon, and Liz’s dog. Poppy sometimes attends events with them, and can often be found in the workshop with her trusty blanket. Oh, and occasionally modeling some of Simon’s favourite Stihl products too! Check out www.treecarving.co.uk/when-poppy-met-stihl/ to see her in action, as well as finding out some of his recommendations.

tv themed sculptures by simon o'rourke. To-scale wooden sculptures of Cilla Black and Ken Dodd outside the Liver Building

Live Carving

It isn’t just incredible to see what Simon creates. It’s absolutely fascinating to watch the process too. Simon often competes and does demonstrations at events over the summer. If you get the chance, it’s well worth watching. For now, we’ll just have to leave you with this great shot of Simon wielding one of his favourite Stihl chainsaws to create the Ken Dodd’s face…

Simon O'Rourke using a chainsaw to carve a wooden sculpture of Ken Dodd

TV Themed Sculptures: Countryfile

Our next TV themed sculpture was created as a secret project for the BBC TV Show Countryfile. They were unveiled during the Countryfile Live event at Blenheim Palace in 2018. Simon created two separate pieces that depict each of the presenters in a portrait ‘montage’ or ‘collage’. The pieces were displayed during the event, and although Simon didn’t meet them, we heard that the presenters loved their likenesses! The photos definitely show some happy customers!

tv themed sculptures: countryfile presenters stand with their likeness created in wood by simon o'rourke

TV themed sculptures by simon o'rourke. Countryfile presenters sitting with their likelnesses carved into two pieces of wood by simon o'rourke

Photo from The Oxford Mail

TV Themed Sculptures: Game of Thrones

We thought we ould save this one for last… The egg casket from Game of Thrones.
At the end of 2018, Simon was chosen as one of 18 artists whose work would be used to promote the final season of HBO’s hit show Game of Thrones. HBO gave each artist an original prop from the show. Their task was to reimagine it somehow or to create something additional using that prop.  It was no small thing when the dragon eggs arrived here in Wales…

Simon chose to create a case for the eggs. The idea was that they could be carried in the case when they were presented as a wedding gift.

Simon made the casket from yew, which had some beautiful markings and colouring.  He created
seemingly random Dragon teeth throughout the interior, that hold the eggs securely in place. He shrouded the mouth with abstract dragon wings and added ash poles for carrying.
The final sculpture is stunning. It shows not only Simon’s technical ability, but his creativity, and understanding of symbolism. Each and every detail was carefully thought about to create this impact, which we share in our blog ‘For the Throne’.

tv themed sculptures: egg case for game of thrones by simon o'rourke

 

close up of game of thrones egg casket by simon o'rourke

Poppy, Simon, Liz O'Rourke with the Game of Thrones eggs and casket

What Would You Commission?

If you were to commission a TV themed sculpture, what would it be? We can think of all kinds of applications… fan art for a wall or office, a garden ornament, commemorative sculpture in a hometown…
The great thing too is that they can be obvious (like a portrait) or subtle. An object from a TV show can become a great talking point and focus in a garden for example.

If you would like to commission a TV themed sculpture, contact Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and he can chat with you about ideas, details, costs. We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Memorial sculpture for Robyn by Simon O'Rourke

A Memorial Sculpture for Robyn

A Memorial Sculpture for Robyn 1824 1368 Simon O'Rourke

In our blogs,  the perfect portrait sculpture for you part one and part two, we mentioned commissioning a portrait as a memorial. This week we would like to share a memorial portrait Simon recently created. In fact, it was Simon’s first piece after lockdown began to lift. Thank you to the family for allowing us to write about this memorial aculpture for Robyn.

A memorial sculpture for Robyn carved by Simon O'Rourke depicting a young girl as a fairy with a robin on her open hand

The Commission

Several years ago, Simon received a commission to create a sculpture for a local High School, in memorial of a young student who had tragically passed away. The family were touched by the way the sculpture captured their daughter’s character, even though Simon had never met her. More specifically, they were moved by the way Simon’s portrayal of Robyn captured her loving and caring nature. A

Memorial sculpture for Robyn, carved in oak, depicting a young girl reading a book

Simon’s original memorial for Robyn

Any death of a young person is difficult. However, for this family, there were also questions that took several years to settle. Thankfully they were recently able to find closure and resolution.
To mark the ending of this horrendous time in their lives they wanted to celebrate Robyn’s life. They also wanted to do something that would help eradicate the legal battle which had prevented them from being able to grieve their beautiful daughter. And so, when they moved house, they created a garden that would honour and remember her. Remembering the original memorial scultpure for Robyn that Simon had created, they commissioned a portrait for their garden.

 

memorial sculpture for robyn by simon o'rourke in process. picture depicts a metal stool with a very basic outline carved in oak of a young girl sitting, woth a robin on her outstretched hand

The memorial sculpture for Robyn underway in Simon’s garden

Creating the Memorial Sculpture for Robyn

Although the commission was small in scale compared to many Simon has undertaken (have you seen the Giant Hand of Vrynwy or the Marbury Lady?!), in some ways, it was a big undertaking.
Ensuring a memorial sculpture captures and reflects the person is SO important as it is often a key part of the grieving process, and impacts the way the person will be remembered. Simon understands this, and takes time to ‘get to know’ the person through photos and conversation. He is then able to create a memorial sculpture that is truly honouring to the person.

In the case of Robyn, she was a caring, and loving young lady. The many cards the family received after losing her showed them how respected and valued she was for being a good friend. This sculpture shows Robyn at peace, and serene. It also reflects that caring and gentle nature through her body language and relationship with the robin on her hand.

close up of the face of the oak memoral sculpture for robyn by simon o'rourke. a young girls face is shown in an oak carving with a serene expression

Working from Home

Simon didn’t just face creative challenges with this sculpture. There was also the very real practical challenge of …… LOCKDOWN!

Health and safety of all the team is important to Simon and Liz. So, like many of the population, Simon had to work from home! Also like many of the population, that meant learning to deal with new interruptions (like the dog moving the video camera) and new distractions (a beautiful garden to tend) In case you didn’t catch them on our Facebook page, here are some of the videos of the memorial sculpture for Robyn in progress….

Back on the chainsaw after 8 weeks! It's been good for me to have a break though …

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Wednesday, 20 May 2020

What a scorcher!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Wednesday, 20 May 2020

The Finished Sculpture

As you can see in the videos, Simon used his Stihl cordless chainsaws for the bulk of the carving. He then used Saburrtooth bits to add details and texture. The memorial sculpture for Robyn is oak, which means it is sturdy and stands up well to the chainsaws! It also means it is durable, and will withstand wind and rain – essential for an outdoor sculpture. Oak tends to pull out more brown hues than blacks or greys. This means as the sculpture ages, it will both deepen in colour and become much ‘warmer’ in tone.  This video shows the finished piece from several different angles.

 

Here's a little video to show a different angle!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Friday, 22 May 2020

Testimonial

Simon received a lot of lovely feedback on social media when he originally shared the picture of the memorial for Robyn. Thank you to those who commented! The most important thing though is that the client is happy…..

I do need to thank you for undertaking the carving. As soon as I saw it I was so moved. It is beautful and I thank you for creating a carving in remembrance of Robyn

It is ALWAYS humbling to receive such lovely comments. Even more so when the piece marks the ending of something as challenging as these clients have walked through. Being a part of the healing journey for clients is truly an honour. We think Robyn looks beautiful in the garden created in her memory, and we hope this sculpture will bring the family joy for years and years to come.

Photo provided by client and used with permission.

Commissioning Your Own Memorial Sculpture

If you would like to commission a sculpture in memorial of a loved one, Simon would love to hear from you. Visit us on http://www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ to connect.