manpatools

Close up of Simon O'Rourke using the manpatools belt sander to refine the mouth of a water dragon. It is one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

FAQs: Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures

FAQs: Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures 1098 1098 Simon O'Rourke

Welcome back to our FAQs blog series! In part two we look at Simon’s favourite Manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

Chainsaw artist simon o'rourke is using one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures. The round cutter tool is being used to add texture to flames as a phoenix rises from them.

Using the round cutter head to create texture on the phoenix

About Manpatools

Before we go into specific tools, a little bit about Manpatools.
They’ve been around since 1988. This means they have had over 30 years to develop their tools, and to still be in existence, clearly have a strong customer base. This in itself speaks of quality and customer satisfaction. They focus on attachments that work with an angle grinder, and in the UK are available through www.chainsawbars.co.uk. Incidentally, if you want to know more about buying through them, you can read our blog about our collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk.
In general, Manpatools are a great quality product, with excellent functionality. They are nicely balanced, straightforward to attach, and come with different sizing rings so you can use different angle grinders. As a bonus, they are also neatly packaged, well presented, and come with an easy-to-understand user manual. Basically a winning product all round!

simon o'rourke's Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: the multicutter. Photo shows the multicutter with various attachments and accessories spread out alongside a manual.

The manpatools multicutter comes with everything you need to get started.

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Belt Sander.

The first of the tools Simon has enjoyed using is the Manpatools belt sander.
As you can see, it is chunkier than some, and Simon reports “it has some beef”. For those who are uncertain, when it comes to power tools, that’s usually a compliment! That said, Simon reports there is minimal vibration when using the sander.

The size means it isn’t great for precision work when it comes to creating textured sculptures, but it’s great for creating contrast in larger areas. For example, creating a smoother appearance on the bones in the wings of this water dragon collaboration with Keiji during the 2019 Huskycup.

simon o'rourke's Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on sculptures. Photo shows SImon using a belt sander to create smooth texture on the bones of dragon wings

Simon uses the manpatools belt sander

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Rear Handle

Another of Simon’s favourite Manpatools products is the rear handle attachment. This is really great when working on a large scale, or with chunky pieces of timber. It transforms the angle grinder (Simon likes a Milwaukee angle grinder by the way) to a rear handle tool. It’s easy to put together, and holding the tool from further away means less vibration.
Although this may not seem to be a big thing, it’s actually super important for health. Vibration can cause changes in tendons, muscles, bones, and joints, and it can also affect the nervous system. Collectively, these effects are known as Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS), and it isn’t something you want! Minimal vibration helps prevent these problems from developing.

Close up of Simon O'Rourke using the manpatools belt sander to refine the mouth of a water dragon. It is one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

Simon refines the water dragon mouth with the Manpatools belt sander

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Multicutter

The multicutter by Manpatools has become one of Simon’s essential pieces of kit. It is absolutely brilliant for creating texture on sculptures, and extremely versatile because this attachment also comes with a range of attachments!
The basic kit comes with a side handle, wrench, pulley wheel, drive belt, sizing rings, a rounded carbide cutter, cutter housing, and  – of course – the cutter itself. It’s extremely smooth with no wobble and has a massive amount of applications depending on the cutter used.

For those who have time, Simon introduces the tools in much more detail in this 20-minute video, as well as showing how to put them together…

Favourite Manpatools for creating Texture on Sculptures: Shaped Cutters

As we said, one of the things that makes the multicutter so versatile is the various attachments available. It comes with the round cutter, and Simon has also tried the square, triangle, v, hole, crack, and miniature cutters.

The round cutter is a staple and was used to create the scales on Maggon the Fire-Breathing Dragon, featured on George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces. You can actually stay in this building, and see the incredible texture up close for yourself! Visit www.thedragontower.co.uk to find out more.

A close-up of a redwood dragon mounted onto a wall, breathing fire! The close up shows the texture of the scales that artist simon o'rourke created using a manpatools round cutter attached to a milwaukee grinder; one of his favourite tools for creating texture on sculptures.

A close up of Maggon the Dragon shows the texture created with a round cutter.

Focus on: Miniature Cutter & Crack Cutter

It didn’t take long for the miniature cutter to become one of Simon’s favourite attachments. He finds it especially useful for adding subtle texture and movement to a sculpture. For example, folds in clothing and other drapery, such as the clothing on this angel.

Simon tends to use the miniature cutter with very gentle, light movements. In this way, he takes very little off the wood and doesn’t dig very deep. He’s mindful of the direction of the fabric and uses it next to larger folds to create more subtle movement. If he does need to remove larger amounts to show a deep fold, he sometimes turns it on its side and scrapes, leaving a deeper cut and greater shadow. You can see both techniques demonstrated in this video.

angel sculpture by simon o'rourke stands surrounded by greenery. The angel has 'praying hands' and a serene expression.

The Manpatools miniature cutter was used to enhance the drapery in this angel sculpture.

Focus on: Triangle Cutter

The triangle cutter is absolutely amazing for creating fur and hair. It’s a unique tool, and is one of Simon’s top tools. The shape of the cutter allows Simon to create thin, sharp lines, such as the mane of this Sri Lankan lion.

 

A tip for using the triangle cutter in this way is that less is often more – especially in large scale sculptures. Simon will often add texture to very specific parts of the sculpture rather than the whole thing. For example, on the lion below, he added small sections of texture to show the way the fur lies on the chest, which helps add to the shape of the sculpture.

For those with time and an interest in how to use the tools, you can click HERE to watch Simon demonstrate.

close up of a lion cub carved by simon o'rourke. the photo shows the texture of the chest fur, created with on of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures, the triangle cutter

The fur on the chest of the lion cub was created with the triangle cutter

Other Cutters

Simon has also used the hole cutter for deep holes and some shaping, and the square cutter in a similar way to the triangle. Although they haven’t had their own ‘section’, both are a useful part of his collection and are definitely still some of his favourite Manpatools for creating texture in sculptures.

Close up on a monkey puzzle ent by Simon O'Rourke showing heavily textured trunk created with a manpatools triangle cutter

The texture on this Ent was created with the multicutter tool

Your Own Experience with Manpatools

If you try any of these for your own sculptures, we’d love to see what you create! If you got this link on social media, drop us a photo in the comments.
And if you would like to commission your own sculpture by Simon and watch him in action using some of these tools, use the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will be in touch to discuss details.

Thank you for reading this week’s blog, and we leave you with this video of Simon in action with the Manpatools Multicutter…

tips for carving big cats: a large sculpture of a roaring lion shows the importance of accurate proportions when sculpting.

Tips for Carving Big Cats

Tips for Carving Big Cats 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

As a sculptor, there are certain subjects that Simon is known for, and often asked to create. Fictional characters and dragons are definitely in the top two. Another popular subject for sculptures is the lion. In fact, any big cat!
Over the years Simon has created many sculptures of big cats, including lions, tigers and cheetahs. A couple of those sculptures that people have especially enjoyed include The Guardian and the Sri Lankan Lion. Carving the same subject allows for a lot of learning and refining. Since Simon recently created the lion family photographed below, we thought we would share some of his tips for carving big cats…

Tips for carving big cats by simon o'rourke. Photo shows a lion family Simon created from two separate tree trunks. One shows a male lion twisted to look in the direction of the second trunk which shows a lioness climbing down the trunk to reach a cub.

A lion family diptych Simon created this year

Tips for Carving Big Cats: Research

The starting point for a realistic sculpture of a big cat, is research. The goal of that research is to understand the underlying structure of the animal. That includes the skeleton, how the muscles lie (and where), and how each individual body part is formed. For example, understanding the paws is an area of study in itself. This is important because the proportions of the animal are dictated by its skeleton and muscles. They also dictate what positions the big cat may be in, and the shape we see on the outside.
Other research includes things like texture and direction of the fur and how it contrasts between different parts of the body.
If you are looking for a good basic tutor, Deviant Art has a big cat blog series that is worth checking out.
Once you have a good understanding of anatomy, you can move forward with your sculpture.

tips for carving big cats: a large sculpture of a roaring lion shows the importance of accurate proportions when sculpting.

The skeleton abnd muscle structure determin the proportions and shape of the sculpture.

Tips for Carving Big Cats: Determining a Realistic Pose

Understanding the underlying structure of a big cat allows you to move forward into creating your sculpture. It’s important to consider what your big cat is doing; what’s the story behind the sculpture? Once you have a sense of the story, you can create the basic shape of the animal.
At this point there is sometimes a plot twist or two as Simon discovers cracks or cavities in the wood.
That was the case with the male lion. However, that cavity meant Simon moved the position of the legs slightly, which ultimately created more drama and a sense of story. So don’t worry if you have a surprise or two! With some creative thinking (whilst still considering the basic skeleton and muscle structure) a re-think can actually be a blessing in disguise!

A tree carving by chainsaw artist simon o'rourke. The photo shows a large male lion with his front paws on a pile of rocks. He is twisted to glance over his shoulder. This realistic pose is one of simon's tips for carving big cats.

How realistic that pose will appear is determined not just by the basic shape, but also by emphasis. Simon will often use the tip of a bar to emphasise an indent, curve or a flap of skin. These are the things that help to show which muscles are flexed or relaxed, and where the pose is causing the animal to stretch. They also show the size and shape of the muscles which help to give Simon’s big cat sculptures their sense of strength and power.

a chainsaw carving or a lion in process in a workshop.

This photo of the lion in process shows where Simon is choosing to emphasise specific dips, flaps and twists, such as the flank.

Tips for Carving Big Cats: Keep Looking at Your Reference

Especially with big sculptures, being right on top of the sculpture while you carve can mean you lose a sense of perspective. This means it’s important to keep stepping back and looking at your sculpture. Check the proportions. And always check it against your reference for the animal, whether that’s your rough sketches or a series of animal photos. This principle isn’t unique to big cats. Simon often also talks about the importance of this in carving faces which you can read more about in this blog about the golden ratio.

close up of a lion cub carved into a tree trunk by simon o'rourke

Tips for Carving Big Cats: Adding Texture

Once you are happy with the shape of your sculpture, you can begin to add details and texture. Those details are key in conveying the story of a sculpture. For example, in what direction are the eyes looking? If the mouth is open, is the nose smooth showing a more relaxed animal, or is it wrinkled in a snarl?

At this point, Simon will often use something like the Manpatools multicutter. In this video Simon uses the triangle cutter head effectively to create this striking Sri Lankan lion mane.

At this stage, Simon often also uses his favourite range of Saburrtooth burr bits to create texture. They are especially useful for smaller details like claws, eyes, nose, mouth and ears. However, they can also add subtle rounded shapes like cheeks, or the shape of a paw. They really make a big difference and help take his sculptures to a whole new level!

Tips for carving big cats: SImon O'Rourke uses a saburrtooth flame burr bit to create texture on a lion's face

Tips for Carving Big Cats: Practice Makes Perfect

Simon’s final tip is true of everything. If your first big cats aren’t what you want, don’t give up. Practice is are really the biggest factor in improving your big cat sculptures. It really is true that practice makes perfect!

Friday ramblings about my thought process while carving big cats!!

Posted by Simon O'Rourke – Tree Carving on Friday, 21 August 2020

Your Own Big Cat Sculpture

Do you have a favourite of the big cat sculptures Simon has made? Drop us a comment and let us know!
And if you would like to commission your own big cat sculpture, contact us via the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/
We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

a roraring lion carved by simon o'rourke

 

 

simon o'rourke carving ken dodd sculpture using chainsaw with bar in collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk

Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk 1200 900 Simon O'Rourke

We thought we’d take the opportunity of a lull in new sculptures to share some more from ‘behind the scenes’.  There are so many companies and individuals that are part of treecarving.co.uk. In the past we’ve shared about Acton Safety, OlfiCam and Treetech. This week we’re going to share a bit about our collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk.

simon o'rourke carving ken dodd sculpture using chainsaw with bar in collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

What is a Chainsaw Bar?

Firstly, let’s explain what a chainsaw bar is!
Basically, the ‘bar’ is the long piece of metal at the front of the saw, that the chain goes on. It’s typically an elongated bar with a round end of wear-resistant alloy steel. They are usually 40 to 90 cm (16 to 36 in) in length, although that can vary for more specialised work.  An edge slot guides the cutting chain. Specialized loop-style bars were also used at one time for bucking logs and clearing brush, although they are pretty rare now due to increased hazards of operation.

Not every bar or chain is right for every saw. For example, larger chainsaw bars work best with more powerful saws because it takes more energy to drive a chain around a long bar. That’s why electric saws use bars 18″ and shorter.

Chainsaw bars also have different specifications, such as coatings that make them more rust or water resistant. Add different chain options, and you get a LOT of different performance options. It’ll come as no surprise to you then that having a good choice of equipment is essential when we look for equipment suppliers, as well as them needing to have solid product knowledge. That’s where our collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk comes in.

close up of a chainsaw bar from a carving in process by Simon O'Rourke

About ChainsawBars.Co.Uk

ChainsawBars.Co.Uk is a British company run by Rob Dyer.  It has the largest online stock of chainsaw chains in the country, suitable for most chainsaw makes and models. Importantly for Simon, they are the only importer of Sugihara guide bars and ManpaTools in the UK.  One of their ‘claims to fame’ is that they supply 80% of the Japanese pro market. ChainsawBars.Co.UK is not just a retailer though, and they have been manufacturing bars themselves since 1967.

Those who follow Simon on social media will know that his ManpaTools angle grinders are an essential on his equipment list. Being able to obtain their tools easily and efficiently (such as the multicutter Simon is using to create fur in THIS VIDEO) is extremely important to us, so we’re thankful ChainsawBars.Co.UK make that possible!

Simon O'Rourke work in progress using chainsaw bars from our collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

Our Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.UK

Simon has been a loyal customer of Chainsawbars.Co.UK for several years now. But the relationship goes beyond that.  As well as buying Sugihara carving bars and ManpaTools before, Simon also reviews products for him.

One of the great things about ChainsawBars.Co.UK is their product review videos on their YouTube Channel. As Simon has been involved with creating these, we know that when you watch a review, it is genuine – something that’s SO important when buying equipment.  Below you can see Simon’s review of one of the products Rob Dyer created, the Panther Chainsaw Mill.

More Reviews
For those who are interested in finding out more about the equipment Simon uses, he will be producing some more review videos soon which you can find on his Facebook page, or YouTube Channel.
If you are looking to purchase chainsaw bars, chains, mills, we definitely recommend ChainsawBars.Co.Uk. They are knowledgeable, innovative, efficient and friendly. They also have some great loyalty discounts as an incentive! We are thankful for our collaboration with Chainsawbars.co.uk and the opportunity it gives us not just for great service and easy purchase of essentials, but also to see and try new products as they are released, and be part of the process of improving and developing them through our reviews and feedback.

Huskycup 2019

Huskycup 2019 150 150 Simon O'Rourke
Huskycup 2019

And just like that, Huskycup 2019 is over! After a week of carving by some of the best chainsaw carvers in the world, Blockhausen now has several dragons added to its exhibits – including the fabulous Water Dragon by Simon and Japanese tree carver Keiji Kidokoro.

As we wrote in THIS BLOG, Simon and Keiji had the freedom to make anything relating to the theme ‘dragons’. They decided to create a dragon which would reflect both their cultures, in an ‘east meets west’ Water Dragon.

Simon and Keiji with the finished water dragon

Simon and Keiji with the finished water dragon

East meets West

Initially the dragon seems predominantly Asian because of the serpentine shape and the wave it rests on. Closer look shows a beautiful merging of the cultures though. For example, the wings are very much the scale of those seen in western interpretations of dragons. It also features a more typically western profile with the sloped nose. Up close, we can also see scales more consistent with the dragons of Hollywood movies than those of Asian design.
What other features can you see belonging to each culture?

Initial sketch of Water Dragon by Simon O Rourke and Keiji for Huskycup 2019

The initial concept sketch by Simon

 

Profile view of the finished Water Dragon

Profile view of the finished Water Dragon

Team Work

Part of the success of this dragon was working to each of their strengths. Simon and Keiji have carved together before (Japan 2015 & 2016) which was an asset when designing the piece. Simon imagined and drew the initial design, but very much incorporated Keiji’s skill in fine detailing and consistent texturing. Keiji is also talented with an airbrush, and painted the eyes and a piece of tail. We think both are lovely finishing touches which help bring life to the sculpture.

Keiji painting the eye

Keiji painting the eye

 

View showing the scales over the entire body

View showing the scales over the entire body

 

View from the tail shows another airbrushed touch of colour

View from the tail shows another airbrushed touch of colour

One of Simon’s strengths is creating movement and story in his pieces. As such, he enjoyed working on the coils that create the shape and movement of the dragon. That meant creating the shape of each piece, but also working out placement, so it would be realistic and retain the overall flow of the sculpture. We think he did a great job!

Focus on the coils that gave the eastern serpentine feel

Focus on the coils that gave the eastern serpentine feel

Not All Smooth Sailing (Carving)

Those who follow us on our Facebook page will have seen that the dragon wasn’t without its challenges though! Reaching some parts of the dragon needed some serious climbing and balancing skills! They also drew the smallest pieces of timber in the lottery, and later discovered some rotten wood which meant pausing work to resource something more suitable. Small challenges though in a week which was otherwise packed with successful carving, being inspired by others and enjoying time with the tree carving community.

Their initial wood supply

 

Carving those hard-to-reach places at Huskycup 2019

Carving those hard-to-reach places!

Only As Good As Your Tools!

Simon also got to try some new tools. As always, Stihl (Stihl DE) were faithful to provide chainsaws which are always up to the task! He also got to try some new angle grinding tools provided by Korean company, Manpa. It can be a bit of a gamble working with unfamiliar tools, but in this case it worked out. Both the Stihl and Manpa tools turned out to be great choices for Simon.

Simon working on some fine detail

 

Simon O'Rourke working on some detail for his Huskycup 2019 carve

Working on some fine detail on the wings

Beyond the Carve

Huskycup is about more than the carving though. Blockhausen itself is always worth a visit, but part of what makes the event great and draws back such a high calibre of artist, is the atmosphere and community. The venue even features its own Walk of Fame, honouring artists in the tree carving community! Simon received his star in 2012, and he felt this year’s additions were great choices.

Huskycup 2019 finished carve by Simon O'Rourke and Keiji Kidokoro

The finished head

 

A final photo of the finished Water Dragon

A final photo of the finished Water Dragon

Oh, and for those who noticed the little guy at the front right of the photo? This baby dragon is not only bringing the cute to your screen right now (and showing Simon’s versatility in dragon carving!), but will feature in the Huskycup 2019 charity auction.
Baby dragon for charity auction

Baby dragon for charity auction

For those wanting to see more, the organisers have already started to upload photos and videos which you can enjoy HERE.
Of course, there’s nothing quite like experiencing it for yourself! Huskycup is open to the public, and Blockhausen is open all year round where you can see the Water Dragon for yourself, as well as other creations from over the years.