forestry

Happy New Year

Happy New Year 150 150 Simon O'Rourke
Happy New Year!

Happy New Year and welcome to 2019 to all our readers!

We enjoyed a lovely Christmas with family, friends, birthday celebrations and some travel. Settling back into the workshop, our work for 2019 began this week with this eagle coming in to land.

What’s On in 2019

As this new year takes flight (see what we did there?!), it has been exciting to meet as a team and look forward to the exciting projects it holds. We look forward to sharing them with you in the weeks to come. Look out for pet portraits, woodland trails (including some story writing!), beautiful gifts and commissions for homes and gardens, competitions, demonstrations, and more.

We are delighted about a pitch that was won this week (to be revealed in the coming weeks) as well as one particular extra-exciting completed project which we will be able to share with you later in the year. As always, we are thankful to all our customers and supporters for making this adventure possible.

Theme for the Year

We also have a bit of a theme to announce. The Chinese calendar may say it’s the Year of the Pig, but here at treecarving.co.uk it’s The Year of the Dragon! We can’t say for sure what that looks like without giving away some pretty big spoilers, but you will definitely spot several dragons as 2019 progresses!

Some New Year Wishes

Returning to our first project of the year, in many traditions and cultures, the eagle represents:

  • Strength
  • Courage
  • Hope
  • Resilience
  • Healing
  • Vision
  • Rising above problems

and the ability to soar to heights that others are unable to reach.

However your new year started, we would like to wish all of our customers and supporters all of those things the eagle represents in this year to come, as well as the confidence and strength of the eagle to reach heights you never thought possible.

Woodland Friends

Woodland Friends 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

This week Simon (photographed here on day one) has been working on a couple of commissions for local gardens; transforming the trunks into some woodland friends.

Working on the first sculpture of the week

 

The Sculpture

During the week, a fox, owls, woodpecker and squirrels appeared in the timber. What a delightful group of woodland friends! Simon also gave the stripped-back timber the shape and texture of a tree. He did this by adding details like knots, branch stumps, and a nut hatch. He also created twists and imperfections in the shape and direction of the trunk. These all help capture the attention of the viewer and make the piece seem more realistic.

In addition to the texture detail, each of the woodland friends was actually given a story of its own.
Simon does this by paying attention to the focus, expression and movement of each animal. Each one of them sits, stands, flies or moves in a different direction, with a different expression.

Woodland scene number two from the week

Visual Storytelling

One of the beautiful things about Simon’s storytelling is that they are not so prescriptive that they tell the whole story. |Simon gives clues, but leaves aspects to the imagination of the onlooker:

Who or what is the fox watching?

What is it behind the owl that has caught his attention?

Is the squirrel running for play, or returning to its home in a hurry to avoid a storm? Perhaps it’s looking for escape as a local dog on a walk has broken free and is giving chase?

Maybe something about the eyes and expression or the movement reminds you of a scene from a childhood story of woodland creatures?

Visit our Facebook page for yourselves to see more photos and videos of the finished pieces. Feel free to leave a comment on our photos and videos too, letting us know what you thought!