Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture

Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture 450 600 Simon O'Rourke

Our followers on Facebook will have spotted a lovely new carving this week. Simon travelled over to Llandrindod Wells where he transformed a diseased tree into the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter sculpture…

 

Panpurlais Mad Hatter sculpturte by Simon O'Rourke. Photo shows a view of the whole character with a metal barn roof behind

Background to the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture: The Property

The mad hatter sculpture was a commission for the owners of Pantpurlais, Llandrindod Wells. This beautiful property is set on 23 acres of Powys countryside and has a rich and diverse history. Little is known about the property prior to 1856. However, since then it has changed hands many times and had many uses. This includes being a residence, farm and tea rooms. Owners rebuilt the house following a fire in the early 20th century, and that’s the property that stands today. In Macrh last year Darren and Claire Hudson bought the property and have big plans for the place!

 

Photo shows a 20th century home surrounded by lawn and trees. the property is known as Pantpurlais and is situated in llandrindrod wells

The current house at Pantpurlais

 

Background to the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture: The Tea Rooms

The tea rooms first became a feature of Pantpurlais in 1911. At the time Llandrindod Wells was a thriving spa town. However, as times changes, the owners of Panpurlais saw a decline in interest, and the property became a farm again.
The former tea rooms became derelict, and this part of the town’s history lost. Until the Hudsons took ownership, that is! They have plans to restore the tea rooms back to their former glory over the coming months. From next year, the Pantpurlais tea rooms will once again be a beautiful and vital part of Llandrindod Wells. The Mad Hatter sculpture is part of that revival of the tea rooms.

 

Photo shows a derelict shed in a field with trees to its left. It is the former Pantpurlais teas rooms.

The former tea rooms are currently derelict, but the Hudsons will restore them to their former purpose.

 

Background to the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture: The Commission

Since they took ownership, the Hudsons have been planting trees and working on a biodiversity project.  As part of the work on the property, there was an ash tree damaged by Ash Dieback that needed to be cut down. Saddened by the demise of the ash tree, they commissioned the sculpture to give it new life and make a statement.
Ash dieback is a growing problem in the UK, and only a few months ago Simon  actually transformed another tree impacted by the disease into this amazing dragon. It actually represents a substantial threat to trees in the UK’s forests and parklands, so if you have time, we do recommend reading https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=779 to find out how you can be part of the solution.

 

a tree trunk of an ash tree that had to be cut down due to ash die back. It stands in front of a derelict barn and is the base of the Pantpurlais mad hatter sculpture by simon o'rourke

The owners of Pantpurlais wanted to make a statement by turning this tree killed by ash dieback into a sculpture.

 

The Pantpurlais mad hatter sculpture in progress. The sculpture is outlined but has no detail.

Work in progress on the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter sculpture

 

Background to the Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture: Choosing a Subject

Although the clients knew they wanted a sculpture making from the standing ash stump, they initially weren’t sure what it would be. Knowing the property would become a tea room, Simon suggested The Mad Hatter from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. The clients were happy with this, and so Simon went ahead and drew up sketches. As well as being fitting for the purpose of the tea room, it is also a lovely hint back to the history of the property. Lewis Carroll wrote his classic book during the Victorian era when the spa at Llandrindod Wells and the tea rooms were thriving.

Keeping with this sense of history, Simon took his inspiration from the original John Tenniel illustrations. Although less whimsical or fantastical than later interpretations, this choice means the sculpture ties in beautifully with the history and vision for the tea rooms.

 

chainsaw artist simon o rourke stands in a cherry picker on the left. on the right is the sculpture he is working on - the pantpurlais mad hatter sculpture. the character is carved into a standing ash stump.

Simon at work on the Mad Hatter sculpture.

 

The finished Pantpurlais Mad Hatter Sculpture

Simon worked on-site during some of the warmest and brightest days we have had this year. You’ll notice the Mad Hatter is standing in a teacup. This is not just an artistic choice to hint at the famous tea party scene in Carroll’s book. Simon is always concerned with the longevity of his work, and the cup was also a good choice to add stability to the structure. Functional AND aesthetically pleasing!

 

The Pantpurlais mad hatter sculpture by Simon O'Rourke

 

The clients are delighted with the result, and as the sculpture is on a popular walking route also hope that it will delight others.

The owners are a lovely couple, with big plans for this property. Their concern for biodiversity is something that also just clicked with us. If you’re in the area from next year, we totally recommend a visit to support them in their new venture as well as enjoying the beautiful Welsh countryside. And if you take photos with the Mad Hatter, don’t forget to tag us! We love to see your photos!

 

Pantpurlais mad hatter sculpture against a background of bare trees

 

 

Your Own Commission

If you have a diseased tree and would like to give it new life as a sculpture, you can see if it would be suitable by reading our blog ‘Is my Tree Suitable for a Tree Carving Sculpture?‘.
If it is, contact Simon via the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/. As the story of this sculpture shows, you don’t need to have a clear idea of what you want. Simon is happy to chat with you and get to know you, and make suggestions.

The best tree is a living one. But if a tree is dead, diseased or dangerous, it’s Simon’s pleasure to turn it into a beautiful work of art, as he did with this Mad Hatter.

And if you would like to follow more of the restoration at Pantpurlais, give them a follow HERE.