Affiliates, Resources and Education

Blogs that cover affiliates, resources and education related to chainsaw carving.

marbury lady sculpture by simon o'rourke and the what3words location cook.breath.gangs. the sculpture will be part of Simon O'Rourke's what3words chainsaw carving trail

What3Words Chainsaw Carving Trail

What3Words Chainsaw Carving Trail 600 600 Simon O'Rourke

This week a representative from What3Words approached Simon to ask about using images of the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy, sharing its location with their followers. Of course, the answer was yes! Simon already uses What3Words as part of his work, and has found it extremely helpful. And as soon as they contacted him, something clicked and another idea was born…

 

image showing people sitting in a park. the what3words location is displayed.

Image from what3words

What is What3Words?

Before we talk about the what3words Chainsaw Carving Trail though, let us introduce what3words! For those who haven’t heard of it, what3words is a geocode system. It’s different to anything else out there because it assigns a three-word code to every 3m square of land. That means you can easily share and save precise locations using the website or app – No long GPS codes, and no vague addresses! It’s currently being used for e-commerce and delivery, navigation, emergencies and so much more, and has some massive benefits…

 

Benefits of Using What3Words

As we said, many industries are using what3words. As it directs you to a location within a 3m square of where you need to be, it is much more efficient than a vague address when dealing with roadside telegraph poles, sections of railway track, water pipes, and more. It is set up for voice input and even works when you have no data. All of this combined means it also has massive health and safety benefits, which is how Simon currently uses the app.

 

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke in a cherry picker next to a tall tree carving of a mythical tree woman.

Simon often works alone on large estates and parks and can easily share his exact location using What3Words

 

How Simon Uses What3Words

As you know from our health and safety and chainsaw basics blogs, safety is hugely important to Simon. He’s found that giving what3words locations for his worksite is a way of enhancing his safety practice:

“The accuracy makes any communication much clearer, giving clients, public, and emergency services exact locations”

Imagine you are working on a National Trust property or stately home, such as when he created the Ent, Gollum, and Shakespeare Seat sculptures at Poulton Hall, or the Airman at Highclere. The grounds are huge, and should there be an emergency (or even someone coming with some refreshments!) it can be difficult to explain exactly where to find him. This can cause frustration or even dangerous delays.

By giving a what3words location, people can see EXACTLY where he is working.

 

marbury lady sculpture by simon o'rourke and the what3words location cook.breath.gangs. the sculpture will be part of Simon O'Rourke's what3words chainsaw carving trail

The Marbury Lady sculpture and her exact location using the what3words app

 

Creating a What3Words Chainsaw Carving Trail

Now you know about the app and all its benefits, you’ve probably guessed where we’re going with the what3words chainsaw carving trail!

People often ask where they can see Simon’s sculptures. Sometimes this is easy to explain, as in most residential addresses. Sometimes it’s much harder as they are in a large area, such as the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy at the Vyrnwy Estate. Or perhaps they are visible from a long road like the Dragon of Bethesda on the A5.

Having been prompted by the contact from what3words, we’ve realised it would be really good to extend Simon’s use of what3words, and to share locations of public sculptures.

 

picture of the giant hand of vyrnwy sculpture labelled with its what3words chainsaw carving trail location: incline.lingering.pose

The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy will be much easier to find using this geocode!

 

How Can I do the What3Words Chainsaw Carving Trail?

At the moment the what3words chainsaw carving trail is in progress. But in the next week or so we will have a link set up which gives the locations of some of Simon’s most-requested sculptures. In time we will add to it, so it’s more comprehensive. In future, people will be able to easily see multiple sculptures within a reasonable distance of each other to visit. Or even plan a national road trip! It’s entirely up to you! The map will be visible in the browser or the app.

Until then, look out on social media for both Simon and what3words and we’ll be releasing some of the locations.

It’s exciting to see technology being used collaboratively to make it easier for people to experience Simon’s pieces!

 

photo of O'Rourke's dragon of bethesda sculpture labelled with its what3words chainsaw carving trail code: rumble.wink.meanders

Now drivers can see exactly where the dragon is coming up on the A5 and hopefully there’ll be fewer sudden stoppages!

Final Thoughts on the What3Words Chainsaw Carving Trail

It’s great not just to be using this app for health and safety, but also to allow easier access to art. And to be raising awareness of the app! It has huge potential, and has already saved lives, which is awesome! Thank you to Alice at what3words for the email this week that prompted the trail!

 

photo of simon o'rourke's wwii soldier in workington park. it is labelled with its what3words chainsawcarving trail location: nail.pine.dime

Simon’s WWII soldier is easy to locate in Workington using what3words.

 

If you would like to contact Simon, please use the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact.

 

Using the Stihl MSA 200

Using the Stihl MSA 200 600 600 Simon O'Rourke

Happy New Year!
We’re kicking off 2022 with some tool talk! People often ask about the tools Simon uses, so this week we’re going to share a little more about one of his recommended chainsaws. Keep reading to find out more about using the Stihl MSA 200.

Stihl MSA 200 chainsaw with a plain white background. Part of a blog by Simon O'Rourke about using the Stihl MSA 200 chainsaw.

Stihl MSA 200 (photo from their website)

 

About the Stihl MSA 200

Simon has become a big fan of the Stihl battery chainsaws, and the MSA 200 is one of his most frequently used saws. It’s a cordless/battery-powered saw,  quite small and lightweight (relative to chainsaws!). Its size allows Simon to get close to his pieces which is a bonus for detailing. It’s also a quiet saw – quiet enough that you don’t NEED ear defenders. That said, Simon often still chooses to wear them as it’s more comfortable. Stihl also makes battery backpacks that enable you to carve for longer without changing the battery – very handy!

 

Simon O'rourke using a Stihl MSA 200 chainsaw to create detail in a wood sculpture of Ken Dodd.

Detailing Ken Dodd’s face with the MSA 200

Using the Stihl MSA 200

So, how does Simon use the MSA 200? He mostly uses it as a detail saw. He finds it’s a lovely saw for roughing out precise details in faces or the movement in clothing, fur or anatomy in particular.  One example of this is the drapery on the sculpture below that he’s working on at the moment. He used the MSA 200 to create lines that gave the basic movement – almost like a sketch. That gave movement to the fabric and enhanced the sense of the fabric being pulled in in response to the person stretching.

 

A sculpture in progress in Simon O'Rourke's workshop. Surrounded by chainsaw carving paraphernalia.

 

More About Using the Stihl MSA 2oo

Of course, a chainsaw is nothing without a chainsaw bar! At the moment Simon has his MSA 200 paired with a Canon 8″ .043 gauge carving bar (find out more about Simon’s tips for carving bar maintenance HERE if you’re interested). With the two paired together he finds he can trust his tools and doesn’t have to think about them. Rather, he can focus entirely on the sculpture, which is what every artist wants.
And for those who are interested, Stihl releases a new battery saw later this year; the MSA 300. Unsurprisingly, Simon can’t wait to try it!

 

chainsaw carver simon o'rourke using the stihl MSA 200 chainsaw and battery backpack to carve a series of owls into a tree trunk

Using the MSA 200 with the battery backpack

 

Where to Buy His Recommended Tools?

If you’re looking to buy any of the tools Simon recommends, his Stihl products are from www.stihl.co.uk. He buys his chainsaw bars from www.chainsawbars.co.uk, a company we have talked more about in a previous blog (click HERE to read it). They have a great product range, excellent customer service, quick delivery, and keep their website up to date so if something is out of stock, it will show.

And for those who would like to see Simon using the MSA 2oo, check out the video below. You can see Simon in action, and he adds more detail to the things we’ve shared in this blog.

 

 

If you would like to have Simon use his trusty Stihl MSA 200 to create a sculpture for you (!) please fill out the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.

 

 

Chainsaw and Brush Giant Hand of Vyrnwy Prints

Chainsaw and Brush Giant Hand of Vyrnwy Prints 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

This week on social media, we were excited to launch Simon’s latest collaboration: Chainsaw and Brush. In this week’s blog, we share what it’s all about, and how it began. We’ll also share (importantly!), how you can purchase Chainsaw and Brush art for your home.

What is Chainsaw and Brush?!

At its most basic, Chainsaw and Brush is a collaboration between artist Amanda Waldron and Simon. Amanda is an incredible artist, who will be painting a select number of Simon’s sculptures. Prints of those paintings will be available for sale through Chainsaw and Brush.

 

Chainsaw and Brush Giant Hand of Vyrnwy prints lying on a table

Amanda Waldron’s stunning depiction of the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy sculpture by Simon O’Rourke

 

How Did Chainsaw and Brush Begin?

The lovely Jon Babb contacted Simon, and asked permission for Amanda to paint the famous ‘Giant Hand of Vyrnwy‘. Fast forward a few weeks and…. Mind. Blown!!!
The painting was PERFECT!
In Liz’s words: “This painting was EVERYTHING I’d ever imagined it would be to represent with brush, my husband’s phenomenal sculptures!
Just like that, Chainsaw and Brush began!

 

chainsaw and brush Giant hand of vyrnwy prints shown next to the giant hand sculpture

Amanda’s painting next to a photo of Simon O’Rourke’s Giant Hand of Vyrnwy

Future  Chainsaw and Brush Collaborations

They’re starting off with limited edition prints of Amanda’s fantastic painting of the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy. This edition of A3 bamboo prints will have only 200 prints, so you know you are buying something exclusive!
More paintings will follow, including the ‘Dragon of Bethesda’ which made national news in 2019.

 

dragon of bethesda sculpture by simon o'rourke

Simon’s Dragon of Bethesda is the next sculpture Amanda will be painting as part of the Chainsaw and Brush collaboration

How Can I Buy One of the Chainsaw and Brush Giant Hand of Vyrnwy Prints?

In time Chainsaw and Brush will have several social and web channels. At the moment, they can be found on Facebook at www.facebook.com/chainsawbrush. To buy a print (framed or unframed) you can message them through that page or email Liz at [email protected]. Simon and Amanda both sign the prints and they also come with a certificate of authenticity.

Don’t forget to give the page a ‘like’ to see more phenomenal work as it is released!

chainsaw and brush logo

Look out for the Chainsaw and Brush logo and give them a follow!

 

But What is the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy?

This is probably a good time to talk about the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy for anyone who is new to this blog!

The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy is one of Simon’s best known and most profound sculptures. It is also ten years old this year, so the release of limited edition prints is a lovely anniversary celebration.

The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy was commissioned in 2011 to transform a storm-damaged tree at the Lake Vyrnwy estate. Once 209′ tall, it had to be felled to only 50′. The Forestry Commission wanted it turned into a memorial to the tree it had once been…

 

The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy stands in the Lake Vyrnwy estate

Simon and the Giant Hand of Vyrnwy…

Simon’s sculpture conveys a powerful message. The tree stands in an area of the estate called The Giants of Vyrnwy. He took inspiration from this and came up with the idea of a hand reaching for the sky. That reaching hand is the tree’s final attempt to reach the sky. He wanted to show the hand stretching and straining; fighting to reach its full height. This is why Simon highlighted veins and creases, and why there is visible tension and power in the hand. It reflects a battle against not only the elements but also the damage humans have done.

 

chainsaw and brush giant hand of vyrnwy prints are based on this image of the sculpture

Chainsaw and Brush Giant Hand of Vyrnwy Final Thoughts

The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy is a beautiful and profound sculpture, and Amanda’s painting has certainly done justice to that, and to the beautiful surroundings.
We’re looking forward to seeing her future paintings, and to you being able to take home a piece of Simon’s work in this way!

Please send any Chainsaw and Brush enquiries to [email protected]
All chainsaw carving commissions/enquiries are welcome via www.treecarving.co.uk/contact.

stihl chainsaw with standard bar in front of a fallen tree carved into a dragon by simon o'rourke

Carving Bar Maintenance for Chainsaw Carvers

Carving Bar Maintenance for Chainsaw Carvers 600 600 Simon O'Rourke

Simon is going to be making a series of videos and blogs to share maintenance tips with other chainsaw carvers. We kick that series off this week with this blog about carving bar maintenance for chainsaw carvers…

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke holds a large chainsaw and licks the blade

Thankfully this isn’t a recommended way of cleaning your chainsaw!

What Is a Chainsaw Bar?

For readers who aren’t regular chainsaw users, the bar has the vital job of guiding the chain – the part that does the cutting! Bars come in different lengths, and there are a few different types serving different purposes. For example, a standard bar with a fixed nose sprocket is good for light gardening. Carving bars are special Stellite bars with a smaller nose radius that minimises the possibility of kickback. Maintaining the bar well preserves the life span of not just the bar, but also the chain. It is also a good health and safety practice, as well maintained equipment equals less opportunity for accidents.

 

chainsaw artist simon o'rourke using a small stihl chainsaw to carve a sculpture of a woman

Simon uses one of his signature bars from Tsumura at a live carving event

Carving Bar Maintenance for Chainsaw Carvers Tip One: Filing

The first tip involves the bar rails. The bar rails enclose the groove along the edge of the guide bar, and that groove is the channel the chain runs along. With time and use, those bar rails can crack, chip, or become sloped. This can particularly happen if the chain is too slack and ‘clacks’ against it.
If the bar is no longer flat, it causes the tie strap on the chain to wear out. This in turn compresses the metal and causes what fellow chainsaw carver Mick Burns calls ‘stiff-slack’ syndrome. The result of this is a snapped chain!
So not only does good carving bar maintenance preserve the life of the bar, it preserves the life of the chain too.

The solution to this is maintaining its shape.

Check the bar each time you use it, and if you notice signs of wear and tear or a shape change, file it flat again. A vice may help you hold it in place while you file, and ensure you keep them parallel. Simon uses a diamond file from ChainsawBars.co.uk who sell a range of bar maintenance tools. They also have a fantastic selection of chainsaw bars and a loyalty scheme. They’re definitely one of Simon’s recommended resources!

 

A diamond file on a wooden table. Tool recommended by simon o'rourke as part of his carving bar maintenance for chainsaw carvers tips

Simon recommends using something similar to this Diamond Dressing knife from ChainsawBars.Co.UK to file carving bars flat

 

Carving Bar Maintenance for Chainsaw Carvers Tip Two: Cleaning

The second tip for effective carving bar maintenance is to make sure you clean it well.
This means regularly cleaning all dirt and debris from the bar and the bar groove. If you have bar groove cleaner and compressed air, this will give you the best results. There are also tools available, although you can still do a good job with a simple rag.
This is important because if a bar isn’t clean, it won’t oil well, and oil is key to cooling it down. In turn, a cool bar is key in the bar keeping its shape.
As with filing, ChainsawBars have a range of products for cleaning, and also have a series of videos with maintenance tutorials. You can find the video about cleaning bars HERE.

close up of a dirty chainsaw bar. cleaning the bar every use is one of simon o'rourke's tips for carving bar maintenance for chainsaw carvers.

 

Carving Bar Maintenance for Chainsaw Carvers Tip Three: Appropriate Use

Simon’s final tip for carving bar maintenance is a preventative one. Use it for its correct purpose!
As was mentioned in the description of chainsaw bars, carving bars are designed for the purpose of creating detail or improving performance in high-precision jobs. If they are used for big cuts and massive pieces of timber, they will soon pick up cracks and lose their shape. If you are making big cuts, Simon suggests it’s best to stick to a standard bar.
And if you are starting out and don’t want to invest in lots of equipment, don’t worry. In our blog about “Basic Kit for Starting Chainsaw Carving“, Simon recommends starting with a standard bar anyway!

stihl chainsaw with standard bar in front of a fallen tree carved into a dragon by simon o'rourke

Using a standard bar like this Stihl Rollomatic ES for bigger cuts will help preserve the life of your carving bar for precision work

More About Carving Bar Maintenance

If you are interested in knowing more, Simon also made a video with more detail about basic carving bar maintenance for chainsaw carvers. It’s about eight minutes long, and well worth the watch if you would like to better understand your equipment and how to preserve it. You can watch it below, or find it on his YouTube Channel, Simon O’Rourke.

If you have questions or suggestions for the maintenance series or would like to commission a sculpture, contact Simon using the form at www.treecarving.co.uk/contact.

 

Close up of Simon O'Rourke using the manpatools belt sander to refine the mouth of a water dragon. It is one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

FAQs: Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures

FAQs: Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures 1098 1098 Simon O'Rourke

Welcome back to our FAQs blog series! In part two we look at Simon’s favourite Manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

Chainsaw artist simon o'rourke is using one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures. The round cutter tool is being used to add texture to flames as a phoenix rises from them.

Using the round cutter head to create texture on the phoenix

About Manpatools

Before we go into specific tools, a little bit about Manpatools.
They’ve been around since 1988. This means they have had over 30 years to develop their tools, and to still be in existence, clearly have a strong customer base. This in itself speaks of quality and customer satisfaction. They focus on attachments that work with an angle grinder, and in the UK are available through www.chainsawbars.co.uk. Incidentally, if you want to know more about buying through them, you can read our blog about our collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk.
In general, Manpatools are a great quality product, with excellent functionality. They are nicely balanced, straightforward to attach, and come with different sizing rings so you can use different angle grinders. As a bonus, they are also neatly packaged, well presented, and come with an easy-to-understand user manual. Basically a winning product all round!

simon o'rourke's Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: the multicutter. Photo shows the multicutter with various attachments and accessories spread out alongside a manual.

The manpatools multicutter comes with everything you need to get started.

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Belt Sander.

The first of the tools Simon has enjoyed using is the Manpatools belt sander.
As you can see, it is chunkier than some, and Simon reports “it has some beef”. For those who are uncertain, when it comes to power tools, that’s usually a compliment! That said, Simon reports there is minimal vibration when using the sander.

The size means it isn’t great for precision work when it comes to creating textured sculptures, but it’s great for creating contrast in larger areas. For example, creating a smoother appearance on the bones in the wings of this water dragon collaboration with Keiji during the 2019 Huskycup.

simon o'rourke's Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on sculptures. Photo shows SImon using a belt sander to create smooth texture on the bones of dragon wings

Simon uses the manpatools belt sander

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Rear Handle

Another of Simon’s favourite Manpatools products is the rear handle attachment. This is really great when working on a large scale, or with chunky pieces of timber. It transforms the angle grinder (Simon likes a Milwaukee angle grinder by the way) to a rear handle tool. It’s easy to put together, and holding the tool from further away means less vibration.
Although this may not seem to be a big thing, it’s actually super important for health. Vibration can cause changes in tendons, muscles, bones, and joints, and it can also affect the nervous system. Collectively, these effects are known as Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS), and it isn’t something you want! Minimal vibration helps prevent these problems from developing.

Close up of Simon O'Rourke using the manpatools belt sander to refine the mouth of a water dragon. It is one of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures.

Simon refines the water dragon mouth with the Manpatools belt sander

Favourite Manpatools for Creating Texture on Sculptures: The Multicutter

The multicutter by Manpatools has become one of Simon’s essential pieces of kit. It is absolutely brilliant for creating texture on sculptures, and extremely versatile because this attachment also comes with a range of attachments!
The basic kit comes with a side handle, wrench, pulley wheel, drive belt, sizing rings, a rounded carbide cutter, cutter housing, and  – of course – the cutter itself. It’s extremely smooth with no wobble and has a massive amount of applications depending on the cutter used.

For those who have time, Simon introduces the tools in much more detail in this 20-minute video, as well as showing how to put them together…

Favourite Manpatools for creating Texture on Sculptures: Shaped Cutters

As we said, one of the things that makes the multicutter so versatile is the various attachments available. It comes with the round cutter, and Simon has also tried the square, triangle, v, hole, crack, and miniature cutters.

The round cutter is a staple and was used to create the scales on Maggon the Fire-Breathing Dragon, featured on George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces. You can actually stay in this building, and see the incredible texture up close for yourself! Visit www.thedragontower.co.uk to find out more.

A close-up of a redwood dragon mounted onto a wall, breathing fire! The close up shows the texture of the scales that artist simon o'rourke created using a manpatools round cutter attached to a milwaukee grinder; one of his favourite tools for creating texture on sculptures.

A close up of Maggon the Dragon shows the texture created with a round cutter.

Focus on: Miniature Cutter & Crack Cutter

It didn’t take long for the miniature cutter to become one of Simon’s favourite attachments. He finds it especially useful for adding subtle texture and movement to a sculpture. For example, folds in clothing and other drapery, such as the clothing on this angel.

Simon tends to use the miniature cutter with very gentle, light movements. In this way, he takes very little off the wood and doesn’t dig very deep. He’s mindful of the direction of the fabric and uses it next to larger folds to create more subtle movement. If he does need to remove larger amounts to show a deep fold, he sometimes turns it on its side and scrapes, leaving a deeper cut and greater shadow. You can see both techniques demonstrated in this video.

angel sculpture by simon o'rourke stands surrounded by greenery. The angel has 'praying hands' and a serene expression.

The Manpatools miniature cutter was used to enhance the drapery in this angel sculpture.

Focus on: Triangle Cutter

The triangle cutter is absolutely amazing for creating fur and hair. It’s a unique tool, and is one of Simon’s top tools. The shape of the cutter allows Simon to create thin, sharp lines, such as the mane of this Sri Lankan lion.

 

A tip for using the triangle cutter in this way is that less is often more – especially in large scale sculptures. Simon will often add texture to very specific parts of the sculpture rather than the whole thing. For example, on the lion below, he added small sections of texture to show the way the fur lies on the chest, which helps add to the shape of the sculpture.

For those with time and an interest in how to use the tools, you can click HERE to watch Simon demonstrate.

close up of a lion cub carved by simon o'rourke. the photo shows the texture of the chest fur, created with on of his favourite manpatools for creating texture on sculptures, the triangle cutter

The fur on the chest of the lion cub was created with the triangle cutter

Other Cutters

Simon has also used the hole cutter for deep holes and some shaping, and the square cutter in a similar way to the triangle. Although they haven’t had their own ‘section’, both are a useful part of his collection and are definitely still some of his favourite Manpatools for creating texture in sculptures.

Close up on a monkey puzzle ent by Simon O'Rourke showing heavily textured trunk created with a manpatools triangle cutter

The texture on this Ent was created with the multicutter tool

Your Own Experience with Manpatools

If you try any of these for your own sculptures, we’d love to see what you create! If you got this link on social media, drop us a photo in the comments.
And if you would like to commission your own sculpture by Simon and watch him in action using some of these tools, use the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/ and Simon will be in touch to discuss details.

Thank you for reading this week’s blog, and we leave you with this video of Simon in action with the Manpatools Multicutter…

FAQs: Favourite Tools for Carving Faces

FAQs: Favourite Tools for Carving Faces 2048 2047 Simon O'Rourke

People often ask what tools Simon uses to create sculptures. Sometimes that’s hobbyists and professionals, keen to learn from fellow artists. Sometimes it’s from people watching Simon carve live. People are often amazed to find out the chainsaws are the same tools used by tree surgeons!
When it comes to chainsaw, Simon has a long-standing relationship with Stihl. In fact, that relationship actually goes back to the very first time he used a chainsaw! Their quality and functionality make them a firm favourite. However, Simon also uses other powertools to refine his work. In this blog we will talk about his favourite tools for carving faces.

3m tree trunk in the process of being carved into a sculpture of a woman. She is surrounded by scaffolding, and two stihl chainsaws used for carving are photographed in front of the work in progress. Sculpture is the Marbury Lady by Simon O'Rourke, and the photograph is to show his favourite tools for carving faces.

Simon’s preferred chainsaws are Stihl, for their quality, innovation, and functionality.

 

Favourite Tools for Carving Faces: Saburrtooth Bits

In recent years, Simon has been using Saburrtooth Burr Bits to refine and detail his faces. They have become some of his favourite tools for carving faces especially, and an essential part of his kit. Each of the different shapes come in various sizes and levels of coarseness and can be bought separately or in complete kits. They really help take faces to a whole other level, whether that be the shape and structure or texture.

a close up of Billy Houliston's face carved in oak by simon o'rourke. The face is coarsely textured and demonstrates the impact of some of Simon's favourite tools for carving faces

The texture on the face of Billy Houliston was created with a large flame bit, extra coarse

1: Large Extra Coarse Flame Bit

The first of Simon’s favourite tools for carving faces is the large flame bit, in extra coarse. It’s often the first of the smaller tools that Simon uses to create faces. It’s not only great for shaping, but also leaves the fantastic textured finish seen in sculptures like The Queen of the South footballers.

extra coarse large flame bit by saburrtooth, which is one of Simon O'Rourke's favourite tools for carving faces

Extra coarse large flame bit by Saburrtooth.

 

This particular bit is extremely versatile, has all kinds of uses when carving faces. Simon uses it to shape the corner of the eyes, form the bridge of the nose, and create the outline of the eye sockets. It’s also his tool of choice for the shaping underneath the chin, down the side of the mouth, and other gentle creases. This photo of it in action on the face of The Marbury Lady Sculpture again demonstrates the great texture it creates.

close up of a sculpture in process. the sculpture is a female face created by simon o'rourke and her face is being detailed using a daburrtooth flame bit, one of Simon's favourite tools for carving faces.

The extra coarse large flame bit in action on The Marbuty Lady

2: Large Coarse Taper Bit

Just like the flame bit, it’s obvious how the taper bit got its name! Like the flame bit, this taper is also essential in Simon’s kit.

coarse taper bit made by saburrtooth. photo demonostrates simon o'rourkes favourite tools for carving faces

One of the saburrtooth large taper bits in coarse grit

It’s another extremely versatile tool, and has two main uses depending on which side is used. Simon uses the point to shape the corners of the eyes, in both animal and human faces. It can also be used for the nostrils or lip line. As the tip is still quite wide, there won’t be very strong definition in these facial features yet, but it’s a useful starting point.
The other benefit comes from the flat side which is amazing for creating outlines and rounded shapes.

Although it may seem counter-intuitive to use a flat edge for rounded features, the flat edge is definitely superior for creating convex curves, such as cheeks. The forehead, cheeks, neck and chin on Our Lady of Pen Llyn are perfect examples of curves you can create with this tool.

life size sculpture of a young female carved from oak by Simon O'Rourke

Simon often uses the flat side of the large taper bit for gentle convex curves like the cheeks, forehead and chin on Our Lady of Penllyn

3: Small Flame Bit

The next of Simon’s favourite tools for carving faces is (in his words) “a brilliant little tool“. It’s the small flame bit, and as with all the bits, comes in a variety of grains from fine to extra coarse.

small flame bit by saburrtooth. photo is included to show one of simon o'rourke's favourite tools for carving faces.

One of the small flame bits by Saburrtooth

When sculpting human form, Simon can’t rely on some on colour to create expression and shape. This means he has to create a realistic appearance, life, and expression through the shape and crucially,  differing depths of ‘cuts’.
This bit has a fine tip which can create a finer, deeper cut to refine the face. Some of the applications would be cleaner, clearer nostrils and lips than the taper bit. Simon also used this bit for fine curves and creases, laughter lines, eyebrows, and other creases in the skin caused by movement of the subject. This kind of detail is especially useful for sculptures which will be seen up close, such as the Ayrton Senna bust. Creating something this realistic out of wood replies heavily on the kind of fine, deep lines that the small flame bit creates.

a wood carved bust of F1 driver Ayrton senna in the workshop of creator Simon O'Rourke

close up of simon o'rourke using a fine taper bit to shape the face of a female sculpture. the bit is one of his favourite tools for carving faces.

Fine taper in action on Simon’s Oak Maiden

4: Extra Fine Taper Bit

The fourth of Simon’s favourite tools for carving faces is the extra fine taper. This is used with a small rotary tool, such as a dremel.

Extra fine taper bit by saburrtooth, one of simon o'rourkes favourite tools for carving faces

Extra fine taper bit

If you watch the video on Simon’s Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/p/CEVNCZ6jGFW/, you will see this is an extremely thin bit. And thin, fine bits, create thin, fine details! Simon uses this bit for features like creating lines inside of eyelids for a sharper line and more emphasis. He also uses it for the top of eyelids and between the lips. But basically, it is ideal for anywhere you want to create a sharp, fine line.
As you can see, working with these smaller powertools means getting up close and personal with the sculpture! Being right on top of the sculpture can make it hard to get a real sense of what you are creating though. With that in mind, if you are using these tools, be sure to step back often to check. It’s also important when you do that, to assess your piece from multiple angles.

Sculptor Simon O'Rourke carving a wooden fairy at the Englihs Open CHainsaw competition

Some details require getting up close and personal!

5: Eye Bit

There’s a reason the eye bit has its name! With two flat edges moving to round, it’s shaped like a human eye. And – unsurprisingly – is another useful tool for sculpting eyes!

Eye bit by Saburrtooth

Example of an eye bit from the Saburrtooth range

The video below shows it best, but Simon uses this bit for shaping the eye when it is on its side. He also uses the point to emphasise the corners. Either way, it’s another of his favourite tools for carving faces as it provides great results.

Not Just For Humans!

Our examples so far of sculptures made with these favourite saburrtooth bits have all been human form. Although Simon’s favourite subject to sculpt is human form, he is also known for his amazing fantasy and wildlife sculptures. If you haven’t seen any by the way, why not check out the range of his portfolio at https://www.treecarving.co.uk/portfolio/ or follow on Instagram or Facebook?
But back to favourite tools!
In the same way that the bits we talked about today can be used for human faces, Simon also uses them when sculpting features on animal carvings. This Sri Lankan Lion sculpture shows how effective these bits are for creating those same textures and lines in fur!

a large coarse flame bit is being used by simon o'rourke to create texture in the mane of a lion sculpture

Large coarse flame bit in action on a lion sculpture

How Do You Use Yours?

We’re sure that tools this versatile have many more applications too. Why not drop us a comment with your favourite bits and how you use them? We’d love to hear from you, and it’s important to learn from other artists. Maybe you picked up some tips? Leave us a comment and photo of what you made – we’d love to see your work!

That just about finishes today’s blog, which we hope you found helpful in helping you select tools for your own projects. Before we go through, we couldn’t resist sharing one last sculpture featuring details created with some of Simon’s favourite tools for carving faces. This one is Radagast the Brown from Lord of the Rings, and we just love the texture and lines in the beard and wisened face that help depict Tolkien’s character so perfectly.

radagast the brown from Lord of the Rings carved in wood by simon o'rourke

As always, if you feel inspired by some of the sculptures in this blog and would like to commission your own, contact us through the form on www.treecarving.co.uk/contact/.

 

Online Art Courses with Simon

Online Art Courses with Simon 150 150 Simon O'Rourke

We hope you’re all holding up OK, whatever this lockdown looks like for you. Whether you’re a keyworker (thank you!), homeschooling you, or working from home, we hope you are finding bright spots in every day, and are staying healthy. We know that some of you are more busy at the moment, but others have gained some free time. It’s interesting to see how creative people have been filling that time. Some friends of ours are volunteering at the hospital. Others at the food bank. Some are learning instruments or languages. One friend of ours is even learning British Sign Language!
With that in mind, we have some exciting news for you. During this time, we’re offering online art courses with Simon!

Pyrography fairy wall hanging illustration by Simon O'Rourke

Simon the Illustrator

If you have read his biography, you’ll know Simon trained in illustration. Over the years he’s produced beautiful concept art for clients to show them what their sculpture will look like. Being a sculptor has also enabled him to think in THREE DIMENSIONS, and create artwork that really flows. It’s this knowledge that he hopes to pass on to anyone who wants to take one of these online art courses with Simon.

Those who know him, also know Simon is not just a great artist, but also a patient coach. He is easily able to break down concepts, explain and demonstrate. It’s a natural transition for him for this season to use those skills and his experiences to encourage and equip others in their own journey as artists.

Initial sketch of Water Dragon by Simon O Rourke and Keiji. Learn these skills in our online art courses with Simon.

The initial concept sketch of an east-meets-west Water Dragon by Simon

Is This For Me?

Think you’re not an artist, so this isn’t for you? Guess again!
Drawing is a learnable skill. There are always some that show a natural leaning to visual communication, however this course is all about empowering you to see your subject in a different way. I’d love to be your coach, I’d love to give you the tools and the knowledge to be able to take your drawing skills to the next level. From deciding on a subject, to producing great drawings, I’ll be there to encourage you, guide you, and help you to realise you REALLY CAN produce awesome artwork.

Are you frustrated with your drawings not looking like you imagine them?
Do you love to draw, but find yourself staring at the paper wondering where to start?
Have you looked at art produced by others and wished you knew how to do that?

Whatever your level of experience or current skill, we hope these online art courses with Simon will be beneficial to you.

Beatles illustration in wood wall hanging by Simon o'Rourke

This Beatles wall hanging demonstrates Simon’s versatility as an artist

The Technical Bit!

Our online art courses with Simon ares going to be taught through www.teachable.com. This means they are accessible for you to use when it’s convenient for you, and you aren’t tied to a specific time or day. Simon will start with two courses to begin with, and each session will be added in subsequent weeks. If you are new to Teachable, they actually have an offer at the moment too of 20% off your first course.

If you still aren’t sure, why not check out this video Simon produced as a taster?

Live drawing using iPad

This streaming thing is difficult to manage through OBS, I'll try again, feedback please!

Posted by Simon James O'Rourke on Thursday, 9 April 2020

Share Your Experience

If you decide to take one of our online art courses with Simon, we would love your feedback! Feel free to comment on this blog, through www.Facebook.com/treecarving/ or via email at [email protected]

We’d also love to see the art you create too, so why not upload a picture with the hashtag #artwithsimon

Stay well, and looking forward to hearing from you!

NB: To find out when the courses are live, please check our Twitter or Facebook pages.

simon o'rourke carving ken dodd sculpture using chainsaw with bar in collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk

Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk 1200 900 Simon O'Rourke

We thought we’d take the opportunity of a lull in new sculptures to share some more from ‘behind the scenes’.  There are so many companies and individuals that are part of treecarving.co.uk. In the past we’ve shared about Acton Safety, OlfiCam and Treetech. This week we’re going to share a bit about our collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk.

simon o'rourke carving ken dodd sculpture using chainsaw with bar in collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

What is a Chainsaw Bar?

Firstly, let’s explain what a chainsaw bar is!
Basically, the ‘bar’ is the long piece of metal at the front of the saw, that the chain goes on. It’s typically an elongated bar with a round end of wear-resistant alloy steel. They are usually 40 to 90 cm (16 to 36 in) in length, although that can vary for more specialised work.  An edge slot guides the cutting chain. Specialized loop-style bars were also used at one time for bucking logs and clearing brush, although they are pretty rare now due to increased hazards of operation.

Not every bar or chain is right for every saw. For example, larger chainsaw bars work best with more powerful saws because it takes more energy to drive a chain around a long bar. That’s why electric saws use bars 18″ and shorter.

Chainsaw bars also have different specifications, such as coatings that make them more rust or water resistant. Add different chain options, and you get a LOT of different performance options. It’ll come as no surprise to you then that having a good choice of equipment is essential when we look for equipment suppliers, as well as them needing to have solid product knowledge. That’s where our collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.Uk comes in.

close up of a chainsaw bar from a carving in process by Simon O'Rourke

About ChainsawBars.Co.Uk

ChainsawBars.Co.Uk is a British company run by Rob Dyer.  It has the largest online stock of chainsaw chains in the country, suitable for most chainsaw makes and models. Importantly for Simon, they are the only importer of Sugihara guide bars and ManpaTools in the UK.  One of their ‘claims to fame’ is that they supply 80% of the Japanese pro market. ChainsawBars.Co.UK is not just a retailer though, and they have been manufacturing bars themselves since 1967.

Those who follow Simon on social media will know that his ManpaTools angle grinders are an essential on his equipment list. Being able to obtain their tools easily and efficiently (such as the multicutter Simon is using to create fur in THIS VIDEO) is extremely important to us, so we’re thankful ChainsawBars.Co.UK make that possible!

Simon O'Rourke work in progress using chainsaw bars from our collaboration with chainsawbars.co.uk

Our Collaboration with ChainsawBars.Co.UK

Simon has been a loyal customer of Chainsawbars.Co.UK for several years now. But the relationship goes beyond that.  As well as buying Sugihara carving bars and ManpaTools before, Simon also reviews products for him.

One of the great things about ChainsawBars.Co.UK is their product review videos on their YouTube Channel. As Simon has been involved with creating these, we know that when you watch a review, it is genuine – something that’s SO important when buying equipment.  Below you can see Simon’s review of one of the products Rob Dyer created, the Panther Chainsaw Mill.

More Reviews
For those who are interested in finding out more about the equipment Simon uses, he will be producing some more review videos soon which you can find on his Facebook page, or YouTube Channel.
If you are looking to purchase chainsaw bars, chains, mills, we definitely recommend ChainsawBars.Co.Uk. They are knowledgeable, innovative, efficient and friendly. They also have some great loyalty discounts as an incentive! We are thankful for our collaboration with Chainsawbars.co.uk and the opportunity it gives us not just for great service and easy purchase of essentials, but also to see and try new products as they are released, and be part of the process of improving and developing them through our reviews and feedback.
Poppy met stihl helmet and ear protection

When Poppy met Stihl!

When Poppy met Stihl! 1536 2048 Simon O'Rourke

We thought this would be a good week for something a little different, and a little fun. Simon has been sponsored by Stihl since 2017. It’s a perfect partnership, and a truly authentic one, as he really does love the quality, and range of products. Whether it’s a chainsaw he needs or protective clothing, Stihl have it covered! In this blog, we’ll share some of their products that are used almost daily – featuring our very own pet (and unofficial Tree Carving mascot), POPPY! Scroll down to see what happened when Poppy met Stihl!

Poppy Stihl with the MS500i

When Poppy Met Stihl: The Stihl MS500i

Obviously chainsaw art can’t happen without good, dependable chainsaws! The Stihl MS500i is a high performance saw that makes easy work of large pieces of timber. It uses innovative technology to achieve rapid acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in an unbelievable 0.25 seconds! Definitely not for use on your garden hedge!  In fact, Simon describes it as a ‘beast’! With that kind of power, it’s his first choice for the large cuts to block out big sculptures.
With a hint back to our blog about Acton Health and Safety, this saw also features STIHL’s anti-vibration system. This is important for Simon for minimising some of the well-documented health challenges associated with vibrations from power tools.

When Poppy met stihl clothing

When Poppy Met Stihl: Advance X-TREEm Jacket

If a dog’s got to be out working in all conditions, they need a decent jacket.  The Stihl X-Treem jacket (see what they did there?!)  featured in all these photos does it ALL! We think Poppy makes it look pretty good too! Anyone know any canine modeling agents?
But back to the jacket!
Attachment points for saw guard…… Removable sleeves, spacer material on the shoulders and adjustable ventilation openings for comfortable regulation of body temperature……Ceramic dots on the elbows offer abrasion protection…..Outer shoulder zone has grip dot abrasion protection…… Large areas of high visibility orange with contrast areas for excellent visibility……Two breast pockets, one inside pocket and one sleeve pocket…..
What more could a dog want? Works pretty well for Simon too!

Poppy wasn’t so keen on wearing them, but Simon also relies on the cut-proof and waterproof trousers and lightweight jackets, whether working in the workshop or outdoors.

When poppy met stihl ear protection

When Poppy Met Stihl: Ear Protection

Ear protection is an essential….at least for Simon! Stihl have a great range of gloves, safety glasses, head and ear protection.  Notice the cap too. According to Poppy, Stihl clothing is also for leisure time and not just work!

Poppy met stihl helmet and ear protection

When Poppy Met Stihl: Safety Helmet

Poppy’s final photo features another essential piece of protection. Did you spot it? That’s right, a blanket – an essential for tree carving trips.
OK, not really!
As you may have seen in our blogs about the Marbury Lady, the Spirit of Ecstasy, or the Giant Hand of Vrnwy, Simon often has to climb some fairly tall scaffolding. When he has projects that need him to work at height, he always wears his Stihl safety helmet. Safety is incredibly important, and their helmets have all kinds of ‘add ons’ or design features specific to this kind of work. These range from integrated ear or face protection to vents, or lightweight versions.

If you work with machinery, heights, or just in any area of your work, we do encourage you to follow safety protocols. It may be uncomfortable initially, but optimum health and safety is always worth the initial discomfort.

Poppy, Simon, Liz O'Rourke with the Game of Thrones eggs and casket

Poppy Stihl!

For those who enjoyed our blog featuring Poppy, she actually has her own Instagram account. You can follow her at www.instagram.com/poppystihl. If you come out and see us at the workshop, a show, or an appearance of Hemlock the Dragon, you may also meet her in person as she often comes along. She may be a bit trickier to spot though, as she isn’t always wearing ‘Stihl Orange’!

We hope you enjoyed something slightly different, and (hopefully) more ‘fun’ this week.
We leave you with this video from Simon, sharing a little more about his partnership with Stihl.

Stay safe, stay well, and stay connected.

 

Simon O'Rourke carving a fairy

On Working with Acton Health and Safety

On Working with Acton Health and Safety 720 960 Simon O'Rourke

One of our goals for this year, is to share a few blogs that take you behind-the-scenes, to give you a better idea of ‘life behind the sculpture’. A few weeks ago we shared a blog about working alongside Treetech as part of that. This week we want to introduce you to another company who are invaluable to us, and share a little about working with Acton Health and Safety.
As you’ll know if you read our Blood Donor Day blog about safety with chainsaws, you’ll know that keeping our whole team safe is hugely important to us. Many people are put off when they hear ‘health and safety’. It’s often seen as something boring, or full of petty limitations. It’s SO important though, and we hope you’ll stick with us, and enjoy finding out more about our experience working with Acton Health and Safety…..

Acton Health and Safety logo

About Acton Health and Safety

Acton Health and Safety are a Wrexham based company. They provide a MASSIVE range of services in the area of ‘health and safety’. This ranges from assessments of workplaces to helping companies stay compliant with legislation, through to providing a HUGE range of training and equipping. Again, the list of what they provide is extremely comprehensive and incorporates things like food safety through to fire training, electrical safety, fork lift truck operating procedures, and – you guessed it – chainsaw licensing!

Simon O'Rourke adding detail to an ice carving dragon, Wrexham 2019

Working with the Manpa Angle Grinder. Acton Health and Safety help us keep our work with power tools as safe as possible.

How We Started Working with Acton Health and Safety

We first met Martin from from Acton Health and Safety about four years ago. Over the next few months we then crossed paths with him again at various networking events. Through these meetings, we discovered the company offers a free initial site visit, and invited him to the workshop. In that first visit he reviewed all our health and safety, and fire safety policies and procedures. He also asked questions, and observed our operating practices. We found Martin to be a genuinely lovely man who cares about both his work and his clients, and knew we could really benefit from working with Acton Health and Safety. One of the things we found particularly helpful was that they don’t just complete a review and give a list of things to improve. Rather, as a company, they are then also able to help us fulfill those requirements.

A view of Simon O'Rourke's tree carving workshop. Working with Acton Health and Safety has kept us compliant.

The workshop is a place with lots of potential dangers, but Acton Health and Safety help us minimise those risks

Our Ongoing Relationship with Acton Health and Safety

We have now been clients of Acton Health and Safety Fire Safety for four years. They ensure all policies and procedures are up to date, and our health and safety is in line with current regulations. They help us keep staff and all visitors safe (both on and off site) and assist with risk assessments. This includes giving us guidance for daily, weekly and monthly checks.
This has been SO important to us as a company. We’ve found over the years that having good health and safety practices is about much more than just checking boxes. Knowing we have the best practice possible gives us greater peace of mind. This enables us all to enjoy what we are doing – as well as obviously keeping us safe and healthy!

The Lady of Marbury sculpture by Simon O'Rourke in process

At work on a sculpture. Acton help us ensure all our site work is the safest it can be for Simon and the public.

Mutual Clients!

One of the things we like about working with Acton Health and Safety, is ongoing mutual relationship and connection. Since working with us, Martin has been around the workshop a lot. It meant he was able to see some projects from drawing stage to completion and says he found it “fascinating”. As a result, he has even asked Simon to create myself a few special things for birthday surprises!

“We have a penguin in our garden at home which was a present for my wife… to this day it looks as good as it did when Simon delivered it and secured it down. You need an incredible eye for detail to do the work Simon and Liz do, and they do the work to the highest level whilst obviously ensure all the safety aspects of their works are adhered too!”

Penguin by Simon O'Rourke created for martin working with acton health and safety

 

A Word from Acton Health and Safety

When we were preparing to write this blog, we asked Martin a few questions. We wanted to know what motivates him to work in a field most people avoid. His answer perfectly expresses why we enjoy working with them, and the experience we have. So, we thought in closing, we would let Martin speak for himself:

“When you talk to someone about health and safety they shy away about it, but Acton are not here to scare anyone.  We are here to provide advice, guidance and help build with the client the best environment for the workplace and staff. Our main priority is our clients and to make sure they are confident with the regulations and know the procedures in place. We do this job as we enjoy helping others and making sure everyone is safe.”

Simon O'Rourke carving a fairy

Wearing the right protective clothing is an important part of staying safe!

Final Thoughts

We know health and safety regulations can be a minefield. Having right procedures and policies in place is SO important though. It’s how we stay safe, and how we keep our visitors or the public safe. It creates a more pleasant and productive work environment too when we know we are working within the framework of best heath and safety practice. We love that it means that as clients you can also have peace of mind when Simon is working at your house or place of work too!

If you find compliance overwhelming, we encourage you to connect with Acton Health and Safety. If not them, a company like them. And don’t just take our word for it. You can visit https://www.actonhealthandsafety.co.uk/ and see testimonials from us and other clients too! We’re thankful for our experiences working with Acton Health and Safety, and believe you will be too.